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    Evaluating the Suspect Who Accepts Some Responsibility for the Crime

    During the course of interviewing a suspect who is guilty of committing a crime it is not uncommon for the suspect to acknowledge some level of responsibility for committing the crime. While the suspect’s statement falls short of an admission of guilt, in many situations it becomes a behavior symptom supporting the suspect’s probable guilt. Examples of these circumstances include the ...
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    Medic Up!

    Every team should have a medic. The problem in the past is that medics have been ignored. Until recently, teams have simply adopted medics. Many CERT - SOU Tier 1 and Tier 2 teams throughout the country now incorporate combat medics that are certified from PA, EMT's, Full Paramedics, or etc. These men are often the team's lifeline. With responsibilities for ...
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    Evaluating Omissions within a Suspect's Statement

    An earlier web tip discussed the evaluation of inconsistencies within a suspect's statements. Inconsistencies represent factual changes in an account whereas omissions represent expected information not included within a response. It must be realized that both truthful and deceptive subjects will edit (omit) information from an account. Consequently, it is not the presence of an omission that necessarily indicates deception, but ...
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    Evaluating Inconsistencies Within an Account

    It is a common trial strategy for an attorney to attack inconsistencies within testimony offered by a victim, witness, or an investigator. And yet most victims, witnesses and investigators tell the truth when testifying. On the other hand, consider a suspect who told an arresting officer that a friend drove him home on the night of a crime. Several hours later ...
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    Evaluating a Subject's Posture During an Interview

    The foundation of a subject's nonverbal communication is his posture. How a person's body is positioned in a chair often dictates arm and leg movements and, in some cases, even eye contact. Three inferences can be drawn from a subject's posture: the person's level of interest, their emotional involvement and their level of confidence. **A SUBJECT'S POSTURE REFLECTS INTERNAL THOUGHTS** +Dynamic ...
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    How To Back Up What You Say You Are: Liability Section

    Operators this section is meant to cause you to think about how you're training and how you're documenting your training. Trainers, commanders and operators, because you wear the big CERT, SOG, SOU, ESU, PERT, SAT, SORT, SWAT and the dozens of other acronyms on your chest you better be prepared to back it up in court. This is not meant to ...
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    Correctional Hostage Rescue Operations - CHRT - Part 2

    Taking Your Team to the Next Level the Right Way "Our team is CHRT trained and we sent a couple of guys to SWAT school." This statement should cause every administrator and CERT Commander great concern. Countless units are operating under the false impression that they are ready to handle responsibilities as difficult as corrections hostage rescue with minimal training and ...
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    Eliciting A Subject’s Willingness to Submit to a Voluntary Interview

    In most instances, subjects will agree to answer an investigator’s questions if the conversation occurs at the subject’s home, place of business or over the phone. From an investigative perspective, however, it is far more productive to have the subject agree to come to the investigator’s office for the interview. Once the investigator is alone with the subject in a controlled ...
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    Correctional Hostage Rescue Operations - CHRT - Part 1

    Is Your Team Prepared To Handle These Types of Operations? Caution: don't read this article if you are weak hearted or get queasy easily. I'm going to discuss hostage rescue. It's a popular subject among many teams we talk to. I'm not talking about the sexy, heroic movie stuff with villains and saviors, but the real world - life and death ...
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    Electronic Recording of Interviews and Interrogations

    It has long been recognized that a confession is the strongest piece of evidence a prosecutor can produce against a defendant in a court of law. Consequently, any competent defense attorney will attempt to have a confession suppressed by attacking his client’s Miranda waiver or the police interrogation tactics. Historically, these efforts have not proven to be very successful. However, over ...
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    Do You Invite People to Lie to You?

    No one wants people to lie to them. Yet, I have encountered numerous parents, teachers and investigators who regularly invite deceptive answers from people they question. I am certain they do not do this intentionally. Rather, these individuals have little understanding of the psychology of deception. This web tip is written for individuals who are not dealing with rapists and murderers ...
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    Senior Trainer Tip of the Month

    "We put operators in little tasks that are monumental to an operator, but are trivial to us" This means that we are responsible to ensure the smooth growth of our operators and we, as trainers, should strive to have our operators be the best, even if that means they are better than us in some areas of operations. Don't be threatened, ...
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    Distinguishing Between Admissions and Confessions

    An admission represents a statement that tends toward proving guilt. On the other hand, a confession is a fully corroborated statement during which the suspect accepts personal responsibility for committing a crime. This distinction is important for legal and procedural reasons. For example, a theft suspect who agrees to reimburse the victim for the $1000 stolen has offered an admission, not ...
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    Developing an Interview Strategy

    Some interviews are free-flowing and spontaneous. Often, these interviews are conducted in an uncontrolled environment such as a street corner, an employee’s office or over the telephone. Because the person being interviewed in these situations is generally telling the truth, the investigator does not have to carefully structure an interview strategy. However, when interviewing a person who is motivated to lie ...
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    Creating A Temporary Interviewing Room

    In an ideal world, an interview or interrogation would always be conducted in a room specifically designed for that purpose. Most businesses, however, do not have a room set aside for interviewing job applicants or employees suspected of acts of wrong-doing. Consequently, interviews may be conducted in an open cubical, a business office, a conference room or even a storage facility. ...
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    Considerations with Respect to the Use of Evidence During an Investigation

    The Reid Technique represents a structured investigative approach to solve cases involving little or no evidence. The first step of the technique is factual analysis in which the investigative information is analyzed to identify possible suspects and assess each suspects' probable involvement in the offense. The second step is the interview of possible suspects to develop additional investigative information and behavior ...
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    Consideration For an Investigator’s Attire

    The very first impression a subject forms of an investigator will be based on physical observations -- not only gender, race and body type, but also attire. The desired perception a subject should have is that the investigator is professional, intelligent, non-judgmental and trustworthy. Anyone who has found themselves in a social situation of being either under or over-dressed can appreciate ...
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    Conducting An Exit Interview

    When an employee gives his two week notice to leave a company, the typical response centers around how to find a replacement for that person. What is often overlooked is that the departing employee represents a potential wealth of information in such areas as violations of company policy, theft, sexual harassment, and employee drug use. The reason this employee is a ...
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    The Significance of Identifying Precipitators during a Criminal Investigation

    Over the years we have been consulted on cases in which an investigator was absolutely convinced that a particular suspect was lying when, in fact, the person was telling the truth. In other instances guilty suspects were able to get through an interview without having their lies detected. Behavior symptom analysis is certainly not 100% accurate. However, if proper techniques are ...
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    Building Rapport During an Interview

    Interviews in the popular television show Dragnet were often preceded with the admonition, "Just the facts ma'am." The emotional detachment displayed by Sgt. Friday, however, is generally not conducive to eliciting meaningful information from a subject. People are more comfortable telling the truth to someone whom they trust and can relate to. This is precisely why an investigator should spend the ...
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