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Safe Driver Call Backs

Richard B. Weinblatt

The call-back can be done from the driver’s side area, although most police trainers are advocating a quick walk around the back of the patrol vehicle and doing so from the passenger side front door area. By conducting the driver call back in this manner, you are guiding him away from the traffic that is buzzing by in the roadway and towards the front right corner of your cruiser.

Positioning the person during the stop’s interaction is crucial as the front corner of the car gives you a natural barrier that could protect you and buy you time. When the person comes towards the front of your car, you can move up slightly to be by the front right tire.

Advocates like this as they have the physical barrier. A slight fall back and officers are within reach (and cover) of the passenger compartment and its in-car computer and radio systems. They also have access to shotgun and other weaponry if that is needed.

Some critics of this method lament the distance from your patrol vehicle’s driver’s area. This could be crucial if the traffic stop target decides to drive off before you change position and conduct the driver call-back. Critics also criticize the apparent lack of ability to look into the subject’s car and see what the plain view doctrine could produce.

One way to deal with the need for plain view doctrine curiousness is to call the driver back and ask him to bring his driver’s license. Once you’ve had your meeting at the front of your car, you know with whom you are dealing, and you have the license in your possession, you can request that he go back to his car to retrieve registration and proof of insurance – mandatory financial responsibility documents.

When he heads back to his vehicle, you should be right behind him. This tactic gives you the opportunity to see everything he is doing. This approach also protects you from any attack from the vehicle while doing the walk up.

There are many advantages to conducting vehicle stops this third and relatively new method. As with all police tactics, no one size fits all. This new traffic stop trend should be yet another option on your tool belt of choices.


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  • My_lapd_badge_max50

    LAPDLEO

    almost 7 years ago

    1776 Comments

    Well, I know it's thought provoking, but not a good idea having the subject/suspect get out of the car then go back into the car to retrieve his documents. Maybe we just deal with more armed suspects as a whole, but even with two Officers, it's tactically not a good idea, the suspect might have the advantage of knowing what he has in the car, but you have the advantage of having him in some form of containment! Sorry can't get on board with this one, it's tacticaly unsound. No offence meant but it wouldn't work in LA! Stay Safe!

  • 2012-10-14_15-49-09_546_max50

    LawdawgTRAV

    almost 7 years ago

    832 Comments

    Another option for a car stop, especially with multiple occupants=multiple hands. However, once we stop a car, that person(s) are now our responsibility, so safety is paramount for both them and us. Which sucks, because yeah, some of those are goin to turn out to be badguys. No matter what way or how we conduct a traffic contact, we all just have to remember to never let our guard down, because we never know who we are dealing with. Again, another good option for a contact though. Stay safe guys/gals!!

  • Photo_user_banned_big

    bsmedmpa

    almost 7 years ago

    254 Comments

    I developed these tactics on my own 12 years ago. What can I say, I'm progressive. Also, read how I employ them in Tactics thread, Traffic stops. It's not perfect but damn sure better than walking up to a car. As the cover officer, communicate what the primary officer wants you to do. Take over security on the driver, set back and cover completely etc...not hard, just communicate. I know old habits die hard but this system works. In fact, I think whoever wrote the article stole my ideas from this site!!! LOL

  • Photo_user_banned_big

    bsmedmpa

    almost 7 years ago

    254 Comments

    I developed these tactics on my own 12 years ago. What can I say, I'm progressive. Also, read how I employ them in Tactics thread, Traffic stops. It's not perfect but damn sure better than walking up to a car. As the cover officer, communicate what the primary officer wants you to do. Take over security on the driver, set back and cover completely etc...not hard, just communicate. I know old habits die hard but this system works. In fact, I think whoever wrote the article stole my ideas from this site!!! LOL

  • Truck_graphic_-_badge_medium_max50

    ltprose

    almost 7 years ago

    88 Comments

    How would another officer arriving on scene square this one up? If I show up and a driver is pulled from a vehicle I automatically think more than just a traffic stop. How is the second officer supposed to act as an overwatch? Is he watching the car and other occupants or is he watching the subject standing next to you? This seems like it would bring up too many what ifs, especially if working with inexperienced officers.

  • Img014_max50

    rwhite

    almost 7 years ago

    728 Comments

    I can see where this could be useful with a vehicle that has multiple occupants. I guess this like anything would have to be practiced in order for it to work for each individual officer.

  • Police-officer-making-halting-gesture-_-bxp137668_max50

    TPRTORRES

    almost 7 years ago

    116 Comments

    Key Word: "choices". Never forget that there are no "routine traffic stops" and treat them as such. I used all three ways and is always going to depend on when, where, who and how... This may not be particularly a good practice by the side of a busy Interstate (when is tricky to even get out of a car watching out for traffic) or when your back-up is miles and miles away! Always keep your guard up!! Good article.

  • Wpe36370_max50

    LSpiveyA24

    almost 7 years ago

    206 Comments

    Useful information, I think I will try using this technique. It makes a lot of sense

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