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Photos: Bizarre Border Busts

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Methamphetamine hidden in secret compartments under a vehicle.

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    will52

    about 4 years ago

    46 Comments

    stupid gets stupid.

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    will52

    about 4 years ago

    46 Comments

    How dumb can ya be/

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    SergeantTom

    about 4 years ago

    72 Comments

    Where's the drink holder?!

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    EmilyCragg

    about 4 years ago

    50 Comments

    WHO IS RUNNING DRUGS into the US from outside?

    The Imperial Anatomy of Al-Qaeda. The CIA’s Drug-Running Terrorists and the “Arc of Crisis”
    Part I By Andrew Gavin Marshall

    URL of this article: www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=20907

    Global Research, September 5, 2010

    Introduction

    As the 9th anniversary of 9/11 nears, and the war on terror continues to be waged and grows in ferocity and geography, it seems all the more imperative to return to the events of that fateful September morning and re-examine the reasons for war and the nature of the stated culprit, Al-Qaeda.

    The Global Drug Trade and the CIA

    As a central facet of the covert financing and training of the Afghan Mujahideen, the role of the drug trade became invaluable. The global drug trade has long been used by empires for fuelling and financing conflict with the aim of facilitating imperial domination.

    In 1773, the British colonial governor in Bengal “established a colonial monopoly on the sale of opium.” As Alfred W. McCoy explained in his masterful book, The Politics of Heroin:

    As the East India Company expanded production, opium became India’s main export. [. . . ] Over the next 130 years, Britain actively promoted the export of Indian opium to China, defying Chinese drug laws and fighting two wars to open China’s opium market for its merchants. Using its military and mercantile power, Britain played a central role in making China a vast drug market and in accelerating opium cultivation throughout China. By 1900 China had 13.5 million addicts consuming 39,000 tons of opium.[51]

    In Indochina in the 1940s and 50s, the French intelligence services “enabled the opium trade to survive government suppression efforts,” and subsequently, “CIA activities in Burma helped transform the Shan states from a relatively minor poppy-cultivating area into the largest opium-growing region in the world.”[52] The CIA did this by supporting the Kuomintang (KMT) army in Burma for an invasion of China, and facilitated its monopolization and expansion of the opium trade, allowing the KMT to remain in Burma until a coup in 1961, when they were driven into Laos and Thailand.[53] The CIA subsequently played a very large role in the facilitation of the drugs trade in Laos and Vietnam throughout the 1960s and into the 1970s.[54]

    It was during the 1980s that “the CIA’s covert war in Afghanistan transformed Central Asia from a self-contained opium zone into a major supplier of heroin for the world market,” as:

    Until the late 1970s, tribal farmers in the highlands of Afghanistan and Pakistan grew limited quantities of opium and sold it to merchant caravans bound west for Iran and east to India. In its decade of covert warfare against the Soviet occupation of Afghanistan, the CIA’s operations provided the political protection and logistics linkages that joined Afghanistan’s poppy fields to heroin markets in Europe and America.[55]

    In 1977, General Zia Ul Haq in Pakistan launched a military coup, “imposed a harsh martial-law regime,” and executed former President Zulfiqar Ali Bhutto (father to Benazir Bhutto). When Zia came to power, the Pakistani ISI was a “minor military intelligence unit,” but, under the “advice and assistance of the CIA,” General Zia transformed the ISI “into a powerful covert unit and made it the strong arm of his martial-law regime.”[56]

    The CIA and Saudi money flowed not only to weapons and training for the Mujahideen, but also into the drug trade. Pakistani President Zia-ul-Haq appointed General Fazle Haq as the military governor of Pakistan’s North-West Frontier Province (NWFP), who would “consult with Brzezinski on developing an Afghan resistance program,” and who became a CIA asset. When CIA Director Casey or Vice President George H.W. Bush reviewed the CIA Afghan operation, they went to see Haq; who by 1982, was considered by Interpol to be an international narcotics trafficker. Haq moved much of the narcotics money through the BCCI.[57]

    In May of 1979, prior to the December invasion of the Soviet Union into Afghanistan, a CIA envoy met with Afghan resistance leaders in a meeting organized by the ISI. The ISI “offered the CIA envoy an alliance with its own Afghan client, Gulbuddin Hekmatyar,” who led a small guerilla group. The CIA accepted, and over the following decade, half of the CIA’s aid went to Hekmatyar’s guerillas.[58] Hekmatyar became Afghanistan’s leading mujahideen drug lord, and developed a “complex of six heroin labs in an ISI-controlled area of Baluchistan (Pakistan).”[59]

    The US subsequently, through the 1980s, in conjunction with Saudi Arabia, gave Hekmatyar more than $1 billion in armaments. Immediately, heroin began flowing from Afghanistan to America. By 1980, drug-related deaths in New York City rose 77% since 1979.[60] By 1981, the drug lords in Pakistan and Afghanistan supplied 60% of America’s heroin. Trucks going into Afghanistan with CIA arms from Pakistan would return with heroin “protected by ISI papers from police search.”[61]

    Haq, the CIA asset in Pakistan, “was also running the drug trade,” of which the bank BCCI “was completely involved.” In the 1980s, the CIA insisted that the ISI create “a special cell for the use of heroin for covert actions.” Elaborating:

    This cell promoted the cultivation of opium and the extraction of heroin in Pakistani territory as well as in the Afghan territory under Mujahideen control for being smuggled into Soviet controlled areas in order to make the Soviet troops heroin addicts.[62]

    This plan apparently originated at the suggestion of French intelligence chief and founder of the Safari Club, Alexandre de Marenches, who recommended it to CIA Director Casey.[63]

    In the 1980s, one program undertaken by the United States was to finance Mujahideen propaganda in textbooks for Afghan schools. The US gave the Mujahideen $43 million in “non-lethal” aid for the textbook project alone, which was given by USAID: “The U.S. Agency for International Development, [USAID] coordinated its work with the CIA, which ran the weapons program,” and “The U.S. government told the AID to let the Afghan war chiefs decide the school curriculum and the content of the textbooks.”[64]

    The textbooks were “filled with violent images and militant Islamic teachings,” and “were filled with talk of jihad and featured drawings of guns, bullets, soldiers and mines.” Even since the covert war of the 1980s, the textbooks “have served since then as the Afghan school system's core curriculum. Even the Taliban used the American-produced books.” The books were developed through a USAID grant to the “University of Nebraska-Omaha and its Center for Afghanistan Studies,” and when the books were smuggled into Afghanistan through regional military leaders, “Children were taught to count with illustrations showing tanks, missiles and land mines.” USAID stopped this funding in 1994.[65]

    [59] Peter Dale Scott, op cit., page 74.

    [60] Ibid, pages 75-76.

    [61] Ibid, page 124.

    [62] Ibid, pages 75-76.

    [63] Ibid, page 124.

    [64] Carol Off, Back to school in Afghanistan. CBC: May 6, 2002:
    http://www.cbc.ca/news/background/afghanistan/schools.html

    [65] Joe Stephens and David B. Ottaway, From U.S., the ABC's of Jihad. The Washington Post: March 23, 2002: http://www.washingtonpost.com/ac2/wp-dyn/A5339-2002Mar22?language=p...

    Andrew Gavin Marshall is a Research Associate with the Centre for Research on Globalization (CRG). He is co-editor, with Michel Chossudovsky, of the recent book, "The Global Economic Crisis: The Great Depression of the XXI Century," available to order at Globalresearch.ca.

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    bluebrother

    about 4 years ago

    774 Comments

    Supply and demand, supply and demand, the oldest and simplest form of business. The war is getting larger, more deadler, and costlier. Only a matter of time before total chaos on both sides of the border with Texas, Arizona, California, and then farther north into New Mexico. You must fight brute force with brute force. Send the USMC to do some kick ass cleaning up, get rid of the public relations crap that does not exist anyway, and start from the ground up. Once the war is over or at least someone realizes who is in charge, then you work on public relations. Who gives a crap about what others think, when all around innocent men, women, and children are being randomly slaughtered. It is past time this bullshit stop.

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    BenjaminR

    about 4 years ago

    62 Comments

    Photo # 16: "Border Patrol agents found 166 pounds of marijuana hidden in their minivan."

    Border Patrol agents found it hidden in THEIR minivan? That doesn't sound right.

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    Gunner2251

    about 4 years ago

    16 Comments

    Kinda hard to get around the good nose of well trained dog:-)

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    EmilyCragg

    about 4 years ago

    50 Comments

    http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-1546121267852729018#

    So, when is this gonna be stopped? Who's behind it?

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    CDG59263

    about 4 years ago

    100 Comments

    The photo that's missing that I like is the one of the truck bed full of MJ covered with a piece of plywood which had a motorcycle with the wheels cut in half fastened to the top of the plywood and then tied down to the bed of the truck. The bad guys are sometimes quite creative.

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    JohnsonZ

    about 4 years ago

    4 Comments

    Wonderful! Keep on getting em!

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    matencio

    about 4 years ago

    28 Comments

    So did they cite him for no seat belt? If he was wearing a belt, is it now considered a "seat" belt. I mean he IS the seat now... right?

    Just a passing thought some jack ass attorney will come up with.

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    ahayday

    about 4 years ago

    28 Comments

    roach coach

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    ahayday

    about 4 years ago

    28 Comments

    shoooot theeeeee mooooooon !!!

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    excop23260

    about 4 years ago

    796 Comments

    Looks like good police work. Yeppers, I have seen some of these weird things; not exactly new news in Virginia. some criminals are just a lot crazier than I am.

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    SuzanneNGa

    about 4 years ago

    16548 Comments

    Just when I thought I saw it all....

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