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Working K-9

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Posted almost 7 years ago

 

I have been asked about getting into K-9 from a number of people here and it is high time I put out a general post for it.

No where that I know of in local or federal policing can you come in off the street/academy and go into a K-9 gig. The reason is that you have to earn the spot since it is not only a priviledge, but and added responsiblility in your duties.
Generally, it takes a minimum of at least 4-5 years to get into the selection pool. That varies from agency to agency obviously, but use it as a guide for a time line.

Your hours instantly stop being one that starts and ends on a set time. Your shift is determined by your support mission to the field generally. Other officers will call you at all hours of the night to run a car or objects to look for contraband. Some benefits to this are a take home car and time away from the general norm of regular line duites to maintain proficiency training in your dog.

Lot's of people like dogs, but have not clue about the amount of work and patience it takes to get a green dog (one that knows nothing about what your going to train it for) to perform at a working level.

You have to expect to get bitten once in awhile, especially by the high drive dogs like the German Shepard and Belgian Malinios. You get filthy with urine, feces, throwup, and hair on you and your clothing alot of times.

Most importantly, you have to "It" that is the ability to trust your dog once you have trained it to detect an odor your looking for. Many handlers are guilty of not trusting thier dogs because they as a human cannot see what the dog is showing them with their sense of smell.

Having a K-9 is one of the most rewarding aspects of my life and I can honestly say that I don't want to do anything else except SRT one day.

9-11-logo_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

Very interesting!

Thanks, CBPK9.

Kirlian-fingerprints_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

I’m going have to keep an eye on this topic as it may pay off as I go through K9's in criminal justices class starting next week... :D Can’t wait... Very good points CBPK9


“No one can make you feel inferior without your consent”
– Eleanor Roosevelt

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

WOW, CBPK9 I couldn't have put it better myself. You damn near hit every point of a K-9 handler. I've been a K-9 handler for almost 2 years now and wouldn't give it up for the world. But just like you said, it doesn't end when you get home. I work for a city but am also commissioned through the parish (county to non-louisianians) due to the fact that i get called out a lot to assist with the sheriffs dept. As frustrating as it is to get called out in the early mornings for a K-9 sniff, I love it. I absolutely love K-9 work. As you say, you have to live with the urine smell, hair all over your uniform, the wet dog smell, and having to take care of the dog after hours as well. Not to mention, which you never did or you don't have too, but when i go on a vacation, my dog has to go with me. After all, it's a $10,000 dog that i'm responsible for.
i agree that for most departments it takes a few years before you can become a K-9 handler. And I believe it should. However, i was one of the fortunate ones. I became a handler after being with my department just less than two years. The reason being is that i was the decoy for my dog now, and his last handler, for about a year. For you non law enforcement personnel that don't know, a decoy is one that hides the drugs for the dogs to find during training as well as puts on the bite sleeves and bite suits and takes all of the bites for the dog during training. The previous handler sustained a back injury from a part time job and was no longer able to handle the dog due to jerking that is caused when the dog is over excited. He then transferred to the detective division and i became the new handler due to the fact that i new all of the dogs commands as well as new the dog on a personal level, so to speak, because the old handler and i were friends, the dog knew me off duty as well. Therefore, he quickly adjusted to me taking over.
As for CloverModerator, K-9 is very rewarding but very demanding. Again as CBPK9 said, your shift doesn't end after your 8 hours are up. You still have to take your dog for his nightly and morning walks as well as play with him as you would a child, because they need that attention too. Not to mention that a few times during your shift you have to find a place to let your dog out so that he can go to the bathroom as well as run around and play just so he can stretch his legs.
I could go on and on about being a handler. But i won't. To me, there's nothing better than being a K-9 handler. And if any SWAT members read this and say that there is, well guess what, I do that too. So i have the best of both worlds.

100_0055_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

i am 17, and i have a fully trained GSD, and she is a deputy and i am a cadet, slight little dilemma, so i have partnered up with a former k9 sgt. who is now a regular sgt., and I go out on patrol, as the dogs main handler, with the sgt. as the main deputy, we do get the occasional call out at around 2-3 in the morning. but it is worth it, luckily there is a dog park in our beat, so we take her there, and when people see a couple of sheriffs deputies and a cadet walk in and let the dog play for a while, they are shocked. but when we get a call, the dog is reluctant to leave because she is having so much fun. hehe, me and the dog are also a certified SAR k9 unit, thats fun too, we get to go on hikes on a weekly basis due to the training. Once i become a deputy i will have already had my numerous years of experience being a dog trainer, and being in the LE field,

3734983337_1__max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

right, you are at about a 9 now.
I would quit while your behind now sccsocadet1.

3734983337_1__max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

sccsocadet1 said:

i am 17, and i have a fully trained GSD, and she is a deputy and i am a cadet, slight little dilemma, so i have partnered up with a former k9 sgt. who is now a regular sgt., and I go out on patrol, as the dogs main handler, with the sgt. as the main deputy, we do get the occasional call out at around 2-3 in the morning. but it is worth it, luckily there is a dog park in our beat, so we take her there, and when people see a couple of sheriffs deputies and a cadet walk in and let the dog play for a while, they are shocked. but when we get a call, the dog is reluctant to leave because she is having so much fun. hehe, me and the dog are also a certified SAR k9 unit, thats fun too, we get to go on hikes on a weekly basis due to the training. Once i become a deputy i will have already had my numerous years of experience being a dog trainer, and being in the LE field,

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

You got just about everypoint we get all the hot calls and good luck on getting off on time

Dispatch_tude_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

Good reading :) I was wondering what the ratio of K9 vs. Dept. size is like. We've just upped our numbers from 6 to 9 with 800+ or so sworn.

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

sccsocadet1 said:

i am 17, and i have a fully trained GSD, and she is a deputy and i am a cadet, slight little dilemma, so i have partnered up with a former k9 sgt. who is now a regular sgt., and I go out on patrol, as the dogs main handler, with the sgt. as the main deputy, we do get the occasional call out at around 2-3 in the morning. but it is worth it, luckily there is a dog park in our beat, so we take her there, and when people see a couple of sheriffs deputies and a cadet walk in and let the dog play for a while, they are shocked. but when we get a call, the dog is reluctant to leave because she is having so much fun. hehe, me and the dog are also a certified SAR k9 unit, thats fun too, we get to go on hikes on a weekly basis due to the training. Once i become a deputy i will have already had my numerous years of experience being a dog trainer, and being in the LE field,

You have 24 hours to PM me with your name, department name, and Sgt's name so this information can be verified. If not, kiss your account goodbye.

The staff will not tolerate trolls on this site.

3734983337_1__max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

YEEEAAA BOOOOYYYYYEEEEEEEEE

367926427_m_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

Let s see what happens GTS...good lookin out

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

He spoke with another staff member last night, perhaps he felt I was too demanding.

3734983337_1__max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

you are kidding right GTS ?

Kirlian-fingerprints_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

ODIN said:

you are kidding right GTS ?

Nope he is not kidding.... Watch the name Odin....


“No one can make you feel inferior without your consent”
– Eleanor Roosevelt

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

Great post CBPK9, all true, the only thing that I will add on this subject concerns time in service, you stated that being selected into K-9 is a privilege, that is so very true, not just a privilege, but an honor. But the main thing in my opinion though with any newly hired officer, deputy or whatever the case may be, is not only that they need to put their time in, but that they need to learn how to be a street cop and learn the ins & outs of the day to day work of a cop before they apply for a specialized unit, especially K-9.

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

How can he say that he got years of experience in this field?? He has no idea what he is talking about. I'm not a cop nor have experience in this field. But i don't think that a cop would take somebody's private pet ( trained or not) in this kind of work field.

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

CBPK9: I love your article. It is great to read and very understanding that your shift never will be over as soon as you are a K9 officer. We don't see the work and efford the cop is setting in his partner the K9. The years of training in the field.

K9_smile_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

I know for a fact that some departments use SAR dogs for general tracking.