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Cliff Notes tools for reports.

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Cam00094_max50

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Posted about 1 month ago

 

  Hello everyone! Let me start off by saying I'm new to how forums work, and also to police link as a whole. Here's a quick background for my question thougn. I am in the police academy in Miami, FL and we are currently on the communications training block which includes report writing. I know police reports, and their accuracy is very important, so I'm looking to see if there are any tools which officers may have made or accuired over their time that helps making cliff notes while on a scene more speedy and accurate? My question comes from a tool some of us used in the military to help us be able to make taking quick notes more simple. For example when we would receive a briefing very quickly in the field some of us had laminated papers that we could just fill in the blanks for certian information as it was given on the fly. i.e.


Hostiles:______ Asmith:______


Ammo:______ coordinates:______ 


 


 


would turn into:


 


Hostiles:__8____ Asmith:__123'____


Ammo:__1000____ coordinates:_12.234N_


 


 


and so on. Basically im wondering if there's resources out there to make taking notes more effcient and quickly for police related calls, like:


Dispatched time:______


Dispatched from:______


On Scene time:_______


Grid:_____


Address:____________


Person1 (complainant):__________


Clothing  (Shirt ect):_____________


Injuries:_______ Inj Location:_______


Stolen Items:____________




1):_______________ Itm Location:___________ Itm Serial#:_________




2):_______________ Itm Location:___________ Itm Serial#:_________




3):_______________ Itm Location:___________ Itm Serial#:_________




 Person 2 (suspect):____________________


Vehicle Make:______________


Vehicle Model:__________


Vehicle Color:____________


Vehicle Year:____________


 


 And so on and so forth with various layouts and information for call types. Im not sure if I explained my question well, so if its cofusing please let me know and I'll try to make it more understandable.


Also feel free to let me know if I'm just over thinking this and looking for a resourcse like this is redundant? Our training instructors throw the information out at use so fast to fill out simulated arrest forms, simulated reports, ect I just thought it might be a good idea.


 


Thanks everyone!


 


 


Kyle 

Eagle_and_flag_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 1 month ago

 

Welcome to Police Link., Kyle!!




Yeah, you're probably overthinking this. If you feel you need to create a cheat sheet (of sorts) to assist you in report taking, go for it. You'll get the hang of it after a while and it'll become second nature.




Just remember: Accuracy and Articulation. You may have to re-read your report for information in a civil or criminal case years after you took the report.




Good Luck.




By the way: it's spelled "azimuth"    


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


In GOD We Trust (All others get searched, then checked through NCIC)

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Texas02n_max600_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 1 month ago

 

Its just familiarity with the region you work. One area might have a high volume of traffic accidents while another area might have a high volume of family violence calls. As the frequency of calls builds, your experience with the reports will increase also.My FTO would constatnly recommend to me to just sit down and read over prior reports from other officers to see how they handled the situation and to become familiar with the report writing style so that when it came time for me to write one, it would not be as difficult. Like 36TR said, after a while it'll become second nature.


"Niether fire nor wind, birth nor death can erase our good deeds." Buddha

Just_passin__thru_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 1 month ago

 

 Keep it simple. Tell the story, use correct English and proofread your work. Remember, defense attorneys are college educated, BAR certified barracudas that will try to discredit you by simply creating doubt about your use of the language. Check boxes on reports can be handy but you have to tell the story.


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Just_passin__thru_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 1 month ago

 

There is also a pretty good publication out there on report writing: "Report It In Writing". by Debbie Goodman. 


The Guy !
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Schultz3_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 1 month ago

 

Dispatch should have a lot of the information you are trying to collect. When they take a call, they will have the date, time, and address as well as the caller and nature of the call. As you check warrants through dispatch, they can attach the names to the case report. If you find property, you can advise them you collected property. They will log all of that stuff for you. If you are glued to a notebook trying to write down everything, you are going to miss a lot. You need to handle your call and be aware of what is going on around you. All agencies are different, so dispatch may operate differently as well.


Most agencies also have some sort of issued recording device of audio and/or video. You can always review these recordings when writing your reports to be sure you remembered everything.

373046_26738651698_2132900450_q_1__max50

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Rate This | Posted about 1 month ago

 

I might repeat what the Sarge said-"Check boxes on reports might be handy,but you have to tell the story.That,is indeed the major point of importance of any report.Anybody can check a box AND the boxes to be filled in may differ,somewhat from jurisdiction to jurisdiction.If you are unable to compile a proper narrative to tell Who,What,Why,Where,When,How and do it in proper language that your superiors can comprehend,as well as the Detectives and prosecutor then you may as well not do a report.

Star_max160_max160_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 1 month ago

 

36TR says ...



Welcome to Police Link., Kyle!!




Yeah, you're probably overthinking this. If you feel you need to create a cheat sheet (of sorts) to assist you in report taking, go for it. You'll get the hang of it after a while and it'll become second nature.




Just remember: Accuracy and Articulation. You may have to re-read your report for information in a civil or criminal case years after you took the report.




Good Luck.




By the way: it's spelled "azimuth"    


 


 'spell check'


 


 


 


 


 


 



It is what it is.............and.........these things too shall pass.

25-1-13-a_1__max50

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Rate This | Posted about 1 month ago

 

Keep it simple..... Pretty much everything you are looking for will already be in the cad/log.  Many reports are also "fill in the box" which you will be completing at the time you are taking the report.  Don't over-think the process, relax and as has been mentioned more than once, SPELL CHECK.

Patrolcar_pic_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 1 month ago

 

There are notebooks that you can buy from places like galls or quartermaster that have all that information on the pages, so you just have to fill in the blanks. Personally, I would save your money. Those things can get costly. Once you get used to what you know you'll need for information each and every time, it'll become second nature.


Go back in time to grammar school......the 5 W's. Who, what, when, where, why. Use the military method of "KISS."


 


(oops, just read that the Ws were already mentioned. oh well, I tried :)


"People sleep peacefully in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf. "

25-1-13-a_1__max50

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Rate This | Posted about 1 month ago

 

Jkaz232 says ...



There are notebooks that you can buy from places like galls or quartermaster that have all that information on the pages, so you just have to fill in the blanks. Personally, I would save your money. Those things can get costly. Once you get used to what you know you'll need for information each and every time, it'll become second nature.


Go back in time to grammar school......the 5 W's. Who, what, when, where, why. Use the military method of "KISS."


 


(oops, just read that the Ws were already mentioned. oh well, I tried :)



So was "KISS" (see above) but I left out the second "S" because I didn't want to cal the OP $tUpld.

Cam00094_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 1 month ago

 

Thanks, for all the helpful replies everyone. I'm sure it's just because this style of writing is new to me, but I was also just given a book from the academy called Report in Writing 5th edition. I'll just have to progress and see how it goes really. I also just wondered if there were any good techniques that veteran in the police field knew, or not.


 


Kyle


 

Patrolcar_pic_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 1 month ago

 

I trained in one dept., then worked about 5 years in another, and last year transferred to hopefully my last. Each one I've worked for desired something a little bit different for writing reports. Once you get one the road and training, I would suggest making quick friends with some of those who write good reports, and follow in their footsteps. Good documentation will save your butt in court, and may even keep a case from going all that far in court.


We write our reports where I am in first person, such as ,


"On 8/28/2014 at about 1800 hours, I was dispatched to 123 Main St for a domestic dispute in progress. Upon my arrival, I spoke to.....who stated,......


Some departments want their reports written such as RO responded to....(RO meaning reporting officer). All depends on what your training officer wants to see.


Report writing can definitely be an art form lol.


"People sleep peacefully in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf. "

Img_1625_max50

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Rate This | Posted 28 days ago

 

What I suggest is don't be afraid or intimidated when it comes to taking reports. During your initial field training period you will be taking all the reports and handling just about everything. You will make mistakes but the job of your training officer is to catch those mistakes and show you the right way to do it. Doing any report in the classroom is very different from doing it on the street. Have confidence in yourself and you will be fine with everything you do. I saw more officers work harder to get out of taking a report than just doing it and getting it done with. When I first went on  the street out of the academy I was concerned about talking on the radio. I didn't want to sound "stupid". Experience took care of that. As far as buying anything on how to write a good report, save your money. If you want to do good, you will.