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Radio call overcalls

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Coprock_max50

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Posted 11 months ago

 

Hi:

I was wondering about radio call procedure. For example, if Central says "Attention all units, 10-35 in progress at 123 Main," and someone radios back that they're on it, could you conceivably radio in and overcall the first unit? For instance, if you knew the address and had a history with the residents? How would you phrase that? Also, would you ever radio back to central and ask for specifics, and how would that be phrased? Again, for those who don't know, I'm a novel writer looking to make things as accurate as possible.  Many thanks.

Eagle_and_flag_max50

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Rated +1 | Posted 11 months ago

 

Not knowing what a "10-35" is, I would simply respond that I was en route also, as a back-up.


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Coprock_max50

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Rate This | Posted 11 months ago

 

36TR says ...



Not knowing what a "10-35" is, I would simply respond that I was en route also, as a back-up.



Thanks for that. I thought 10-35 was domestic in progress. What if you wanted to call off the unit that was headed there? What if you didn't think, for whatever reason, that the LEO in question was the best one for this particular call?

Img_3413_sq90_max50

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Rated +2 | Posted 11 months ago

 

I am not a LEO, but I do work for a Police Agency. The codes differ in different areas (even differ throughout the same state).. They are not the same everywhere which is why more and more are going to plain talk instead of codes... as far as you're other questions I'll leave that to the LEOs to answer:-).

25-1-13-a_1__max50

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Rated +1 | Posted 11 months ago

 

The short answer is yes, another unit that is closer could conceivably say that they are closer and take the call as the primary unit.  A call may be dispatched to an "out of beat" unit meaning that the unit is actually assigned to another area of the city.  One of the units assigned to the beat where the call is may hear the call going out as he or she is clearing the call they are on and take it, clearing the "out of beat" unit.  A call may be dispatched to a unit who is less than an hour away from going off duty.  A unit who is on duty but not due to go off duty for several more hours may cancel the one unit and take the primary.  A unit who is working thier early days of the week, may likewise take the primary for the unit that is working the final hour(s) of thier week.  That said, all of this depends on the size of the department and the deployment for the shift(s). How it is phrased depends also on the department and where it is located in the USofA.  Not every department uses the same codes for calls in general or "in progress" calls and let's face it, sometimes we may not all speak alike depending on city, state or region.  I know how most departments in California do business but even that varies depending on department. To give you an example, where I grew up, the local police department used the code 926 adam when asking for a tow truck. Other departments in the same area used the code 11-85.  Where I work, I have to use the code 10-54.  Go figure.

25-1-13-a_1__max50

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Rated +1 | Posted 11 months ago

 

CopRocker says ...



36TR says ...



Not knowing what a "10-35" is, I would simply respond that I was en route also, as a back-up.



Thanks for that. I thought 10-35 was domestic in progress. What if you wanted to call off the unit that was headed there?


EDITIED



If I hear the code 10-35, it usually indicates confidential information regarding a things like a warrant or a stolen car.  If I am running a person record and the person has a warrant, my dispatch would ask if I am 10-35. I would secure that person either in handcuffs or in my unit or both and then get the information rather than have an instant track meet with a mope.  If I run a license plate and disptch records finds the car is stolen, dispatch would tell me that the car returns 10-35 to a make model color car stolen out of city.  The same would go for a car that returns with one lost or stolen plate as sometimes the lost or stolen plate gets placed on a car it does not belong to and could indicate that it is actually a stolen vehicle.

25-1-13-a_1__max50

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Rate This | Posted 11 months ago

 

CopRocker says ...



36TR says ...



Not knowing what a "10-35" is, I would simply respond that I was en route also, as a back-up.



EDITIED


What if you didn't think, for whatever reason, that the LEO in question was the best one for this particular call?



THAT would be NONE OF YOUR BUSINESS. If you wanted to go to the call as a backing unit and help (assist) that is fine.  Put yourself enroute for the back.  Keep in mind that you may be told by disptch, the watch commander or the original primary unit to 10-22 (or otherwise cancel) your response.

Bronzestarribbon_max50

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Rated +1 | Posted 11 months ago

 

If you are going to write a novel about the drama of police calls I would leave ten codes out because depending on which part of the country or state you are from each means something different.  For my jurisdiction that is rape call.  Nowadays with NIMS out there many agencies are going to straight talk on the radio as a normal means of assigning calls; however that is not to say that some elements within an agency maintain ten codes and signals for special ops usage.  After all we don't want the bad guys to know we are coming to call.


The accuracy of the novel would still be there with out signals and ten codes, after all aren't most novels fiction anyway?  I suppose the average reader would not give two shakes, but none the less it would make the scanner land junkies chomp at the bit to figure out what you were referencing.  Just my two cents, so good luck on the novel and keep us posted as to it's proposed publish date. 

Eagle_and_flag_max50

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Rated +1 | Posted 11 months ago

 

CopRocker says ...



36TR says ...



Not knowing what a "10-35" is, I would simply respond that I was en route also, as a back-up.



Thanks for that. I thought 10-35 was domestic in progress. What if you wanted to call off the unit that was headed there? What if you didn't think, for whatever reason, that the LEO in question was the best one for this particular call?



First and foremost, if it's a Domestic Situation, there will always be 2 officers dispatched, at least on my department. Secondly, all of the officers on my department are capable of handling any assigned call they are given. If they weren't, they would be working for my agency. Any personal opinion I may have towards the responding officer does not come into play. Additionally, I'm not going to over-ride my dispatcher when they dispatch the beat/district officer, or any officer for that matter.


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373046_26738651698_2132900450_q_1__max50

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Rated +1 | Posted 10 months ago

 

CopRocker- A number of things come to mind en re to your questions.I worked four different jurisdictions in two states for some twenty seven years.Two Police Depts. and two Sheriffs Depts. Not a whole lot of agencies use the 10- code any more.They go either with a scrambled signal,signal codes modified 10 codes or just simply English.THe 10 codes look cool in movies and t.v.En re to your back up being the best for that specific call,unfortunately we cannot pick and chose who our back up will be.I say unfortunately because I have run into that problem previously as many of us have.I worked a crew once where one of the officers NEVER got out of his cruiser on a disturbance.I worked another crew when if a particular officer was  dispatched to a disturbance he ALWAYS went out of service with a traffic stop en route to the call.

Wredcedar_max50

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Rated +1 | Posted 10 months ago

 

Most agencies use an enhanced CAD (computer aided dispatch), so when a call comes out at 123 Main, a history of previous calls is available to the dispatcher.  Thus the dispatcher might respond with previous similar calls at that address.  Ie, there was a domestic at 123 Main on 12/02/2013 at 2339 hrs or there have been 5 domestic calls at 123 Main in the last month.


Also if you had a history with the residents, the other officers would probaly be aware of that, typically an officer will know what all the other units are doing.

Coprock_max50

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Rate This | Posted 10 months ago

 

SE851 says ...



CopRocker- A number of things come to mind en re to your questions.I worked four different jurisdictions in two states for some twenty seven years.Two Police Depts. and two Sheriffs Depts. Not a whole lot of agencies use the 10- code any more.They go either with a scrambled signal,signal codes modified 10 codes or just simply English.THe 10 codes look cool in movies and t.v.En re to your back up being the best for that specific call,unfortunately we cannot pick and chose who our back up will be.I say unfortunately because I have run into that problem previously as many of us have.I worked a crew once where one of the officers NEVER got out of his cruiser on a disturbance.I worked another crew when if a particular officer was  dispatched to a disturbance he ALWAYS went out of service with a traffic stop en route to the call.



Thanks a bunch! What does a "Scrambled signal" mean?

Eagle_and_flag_max50

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Rated +1 | Posted 10 months ago

 

CopRocker says ...



SE851 says ...



CopRocker- A number of things come to mind en re to your questions.I worked four different jurisdictions in two states for some twenty seven years.Two Police Depts. and two Sheriffs Depts. Not a whole lot of agencies use the 10- code any more.They go either with a scrambled signal,signal codes modified 10 codes or just simply English.THe 10 codes look cool in movies and t.v.En re to your back up being the best for that specific call,unfortunately we cannot pick and chose who our back up will be.I say unfortunately because I have run into that problem previously as many of us have.I worked a crew once where one of the officers NEVER got out of his cruiser on a disturbance.I worked another crew when if a particular officer was  dispatched to a disturbance he ALWAYS went out of service with a traffic stop en route to the call.



Thanks a bunch! What does a "Scrambled signal" mean?



It's a radio or communication device with encoded transmissions. Only another radio or monitoring system with that code can pick it up.


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25-1-13-a_1__max50

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Rate This | Posted 10 months ago

 

36TR says ...



CopRocker says ...



SE851 says ...



CopRocker- A number of things come to mind en re to your questions.I worked four different jurisdictions in two states for some twenty seven years.Two Police Depts. and two Sheriffs Depts. Not a whole lot of agencies use the 10- code any more.They go either with a scrambled signal,signal codes modified 10 codes or just simply English.THe 10 codes look cool in movies and t.v.En re to your back up being the best for that specific call,unfortunately we cannot pick and chose who our back up will be.I say unfortunately because I have run into that problem previously as many of us have.I worked a crew once where one of the officers NEVER got out of his cruiser on a disturbance.I worked another crew when if a particular officer was  dispatched to a disturbance he ALWAYS went out of service with a traffic stop en route to the call.



Thanks a bunch! What does a "Scrambled signal" mean?



It's a radio or communication device with encoded transmissions. Only another radio or monitoring system with that code can pick it up.



There are some hobbyists out there that can go to a certain electronics store or radio stores and buy what is known as a Police Scanner.  Back in the day, they were limited as to a maximum of 3 to 5 frequencies and you had to bey the "crystals" for the frequencies that you wanted to monitor. Early scanner were AM fequencies and eventually went to the FM bands.  Eventually, these scanners became programable.  As higher frequencies became available to police and fire angencies and to avoid the public monitoring of these frequencies, the older scanners became more or less obsolete.  More recently there has been a shift to 800-900Mhz frequencies and "trunked" systems which use several frequencies for an entire city or county and have all of the departments broken into "talk groups."  The frequencies needed to be in a certain order with a series of "control" frequencies that made everything work.  Since the scanners of the day were only able to monitor up to 500 channels individually, they were not able to monitor the trunked systems.  Then scanners were introduced that made trunked system scanning possible.


As problems came about, the next series of radios were being developed.  Some time in the 1990's after the Los Angeles Lakers had won an NBA chmpionship, I was driving around Los Angeles listening to the events of the championship parade behind the scene (LAPD) on my scanner and the rest of the LAPD on some of their other frequencies.  The next day, I was again driving around Los Angeles but absolutely none of the LAPD frequencies were working.  Except for the older LAPD Hotshot frequency, there was dead silence.  Turns out that the very next day after the parade, they "flipped the switch" and a newer trunked and digital system became fully operational.  Not even the trunk capable scanners could listen to this system.


Orange County, California had two syatems were in place during the 1990's.  Police services including the Sheriff's Department, Marshall's Department and all city departments throughout the county operated on the 460Mhz FM bandwidth, each with both individual dedicated frquencies and shared frequencies.  Fire services were and are still on a conventional 900Mhz trunked system.  Police services were working to solve two problems. The first problem was an over-zealos newspaper reporter who would respond to crimes and crime scenes and interfere with on going investigations.  The second was a very crafty ham radio operator who had modified conventionaal ham radios to not only listen to police frequencies in the 460Mhz range but also transmit.  He began making false calls for officer needs help, officer down or other crimes in progress that would get multiple agencies to respond only to find nothing wrong.  Like the LAPD, they eventually flipped the switch on thier new digitally encrypted and trunked system and dead quiet went all of the Orange County frequencies with the exception of the "RED" channel which was used throughout the county for pursuits.


Scanners are available for these systems but they are very expensive.  Only the most serious hobby or enthusiasts who are able to afford them can monitor these frequencies. 

Just_passin__thru_max50

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Rate This | Posted 10 months ago

 

Update: You can scan many agencies by simply pulling up an app on your phone.


Mr. Noveler, you won't find much in the way of consensus about what codes or freqs or signals or grunts or mic clicks would work for a police novel. It can be very different from adjacent agencies in the same county. There are also 9-codes, 8-codes and some super slick codes within codes to defeat scanner monkeys.


Plain speak is probably best. The closest you'll come to agency likeness is the use of the phonetic alphabet. Agencies and departments generally don't use the military Alpha, Bravo, Charlie protocol. They will use the Adam, Boy, Charles sequencing.


 


 


 


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1asteriskshield_ezr_max50

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Rate This | Posted 10 months ago

 

 I like 10 codes. They make me feel like a cop. I would simply check en route as well, not a big deal. We also have signal this and signal that, oh and I forgot to mention the code calls. This is simply secret squirrel stuff. You must have the decoder ring found in specially marked boxes of Lucky Charms cereals to figure those out.


You can't cure stupid.

25-1-13-a_1__max50

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Rate This | Posted 10 months ago

 

TheSarge says ...



Update: You can scan many agencies by simply pulling up an app on your phone.


Mr. Noveler, you won't find much in the way of consensus about what codes or freqs or signals or grunts or mic clicks would work for a police novel. It can be very different from adjacent agencies in the same county. There are also 9-codes, 8-codes and some super slick codes within codes to defeat scanner monkeys.


Plain speak is probably best. The closest you'll come to agency likeness is the use of the phonetic alphabet. Agencies and departments generally don't use the military Alpha, Bravo, Charlie protocol. They will use the Adam, Boy, Charles sequencing. 



You forgot the 11 codes

Gator_max50

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Rate This | Posted 10 months ago

 

SkoolCop says ...



TheSarge says ...



Update: You can scan many agencies by simply pulling up an app on your phone.


Mr. Noveler, you won't find much in the way of consensus about what codes or freqs or signals or grunts or mic clicks would work for a police novel. It can be very different from adjacent agencies in the same county. There are also 9-codes, 8-codes and some super slick codes within codes to defeat scanner monkeys.


Plain speak is probably best. The closest you'll come to agency likeness is the use of the phonetic alphabet. Agencies and departments generally don't use the military Alpha, Bravo, Charlie protocol. They will use the Adam, Boy, Charles sequencing. 



You forgot the 11 codes



You find the 11 codes in specially marked Frosted Flakes boxes.