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Interesting language development

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Just_passin__thru_max50

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Posted about 1 year ago

 

9-26-13


Of late my ears have perked up to a language evolution that seems intriguing.


The use of the word 'actually' and the use of the phrase 'to tell you the truth'.


I am hearing the use of 'actually' more frequently. Sportscasters, news people, casual conversation.... even I have caught myself using it.


My take on this is I use 'actually' to emphasize that I am 'actually' providing accurate information. So when did I start having to emphasize what I am saying?


And, 'to tell you the truth'... this one is a bit odd. Since when did we start qualifying our comments with a 'to tell you the truth'? As if I wasn't telling you the truth before? 


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Cruise_2014_max50

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9-26-13


Well, Sarge. This ties directly into the phrases "swear to god", "I'm not lying", "on my mother's grave" and "really". People have used them for generations in an effort to convince the listener of the veracity of the story they are giving.


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Mr-natural_1__max50

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Rate This | Posted about 1 year ago

 

"Actually" and "To tell you the truth" are just variations on an idiomatic theme, also expressed in the phrase "in point of fact". I take it as an indicator that you are about to rebut something. That something can be something you just said, someone else just said, or some commonly held belief (or a belief that you perceive as commonly held).


Example:


"He was bigger than I expected: I do not know why I had imagined him slender and of insignificant appearance; in point of fact he was broad and heavy, with large hands and feet, and he wore his evening clothes clumsily."  The Moon and Sixpence (1919)


It's certainly possible that multitudes of contemporary speakers and writers use these idioms improperly (at least with respect to traditional usage--language evolves, as your title suggests). I do not know. I cringe when I hear/see examples of language being forced to evolve to suit the needs of the lowest common denominator.




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Just_passin__thru_max50

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BigNTS says ...



9-26-13


Well, Sarge. This ties directly into the phrases "swear to god", "I'm not lying", "on my mother's grave" and "really". People have used them for generations in an effort to convince the listener of the veracity of the story they are giving.


 


++++++++++++++++++++


Of course. This has been most apparent during a career where statements from people are replete with qualifiers.... just like you indicated above.


What I am bumping into is the new stuff. Like 'actually'. The phunniest aspect is that I catch myself saying it to give veracity (thank you) AND most recently I will 'actually' audibly [with my wife] catch myself. This morning we were talking about something and I said, "Actually....blah, blah. And there's that word actually again." I think I use it authenticate and certify my comments.


Also, words like 'amazing' and 'awesome' are now pretty shop worn. People use the word 'amazing' because of two reasons. It combines a legit word while also being gutteral at the same time. You get to use your lungs and sinuses for that one.


 



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Just_passin__thru_max50

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Rated +2 | Posted about 1 year ago

 

 And why doesn't 'woo-hoo' go away?


I recently graduated a group of 56 recruits from the academy. I instructed them to tell their family and friends to not turn our event into a junior high pep rally or a NASCAR finish line. No mylar balloons, no female audience members in shorty-shorts and tube tops (yeah, they're still around) and no woo-hooing. It's a classy event. The graduating recruits are squared away and the audience needs to be educated in how to act around a classy event. Department heads, Sheriffs and Chiefs from the region were there. Also, no guys showing up in 'wife beaters'.


Actually, it turned out quite nice. Actually.


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Quickley-b240_max50

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TheSarge says ...



 And why doesn't 'woo-hoo' go away?


I recently graduated a group of 56 recruits from the academy. I instructed them to tell their family and friends to not turn our event into a junior high pep rally or a NASCAR finish line. No mylar balloons, no female audience members in shorty-shorts and tube tops (yeah, they're still around) and no woo-hooing. It's a classy event. The graduating recruits are squared away and the audience needs to be educated in how to act around a classy event. Department heads, Sheriffs and Chiefs from the region were there. Also, no guys showing up in 'wife beaters'.


Actually, it turned out quite nice. Actually.



That's amazing!!!


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Female_bodysurfer_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 1 year ago

 

I assume you are referring to vernacular use, Sarge.


"Actually" is often used rudely by brainy and/or obnoxious kids interested in oneupsmanship. Kids use it to open a words-parsing gambit. Prefacing a contradiction with "Actually"  is only a little less pedantic than holding up an index finger to interject - "Correction!"  Use it and better have your ammo ready.


"To tell you the truth" announces one is going to momentarily suspend one's habit of couching terms to the level of dishonesty. 


"I'll be honest" also functions to undermine the speaker's credibility, but with added insult- "I might offend you by saying this, but..."  as one goes right ahead and offends anyway.


Why not just find a less offensive way of saying something that will be taken as an offense?  Or cut out the middle-man and just be offensive.


"Woo hoo!" was always lame.  This deflating non-exclamatory reminds me of timid cubicle workers who are afraid loud chit-chat will raise the boss' ire.


 

Vpsomourningband_max50

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Rated +1 | Posted about 1 year ago

 

bill9823 says ...



TheSarge says ...



 And why doesn't 'woo-hoo' go away?


I recently graduated a group of 56 recruits from the academy. I instructed them to tell their family and friends to not turn our event into a junior high pep rally or a NASCAR finish line. No mylar balloons, no female audience members in shorty-shorts and tube tops (yeah, they're still around) and no woo-hooing. It's a classy event. The graduating recruits are squared away and the audience needs to be educated in how to act around a classy event. Department heads, Sheriffs and Chiefs from the region were there. Also, no guys showing up in 'wife beaters'.


Actually, it turned out quite nice. Actually.



That's amazing!!!



Wooooooooooo Hooooooooooooo!     I wasn't passing this opportunity up for nothin'!


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White_shirt_max50

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I can handle most things other than "you know".

Just_passin__thru_max50

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Sounds like we are all on the same page.


Dennis, you forgot 'know what I mean?". 


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373046_26738651698_2132900450_q_1__max50

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Rate This | Posted about 1 year ago

 

Another one,which "actually" hasn't been used in years is,"I'm here to tell you".Don't miss that one,on my Mothers grave.Mah ain't dead yet anyway.I definately bump The Sarge on the weird "Woo Hoo" and UncaDennis on "You Know",Someone is assuming I know something which I may not.

Batman_max600_1__max50

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Rate This | Posted about 1 year ago

 

How about "right" that drives me bat sh** crazy actually. LOL have had several Officers that say that without thinking about what you are saying.


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Rate This | Posted about 1 year ago

 

Don't forget --


You know ----


I promise  (I didnt do it)


I hear these two phrases all the time --

Death_max50

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There are qualifiers and there are words that are just part of a particular linguistic vernacular. Some people use these phrases to bolster their statement and some just use them like punctuation. The key is WHEN they use them. If the phrase is said with just about every declarative statement, it's just a quirk. If the phrase appears when you're poking a sensitive spot, it's lying.


The qualifiers I hear most often are: when asked what they know/saw it's "from my knowledge" or "all I know is", when they are being emphatic they are just "keeping it real" and when pressed about specific facts they dodge with "me, personally"

1asteriskshield_ezr_max50

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 I actually read this actual topic and actually agree. Qualifiers do not need to be used except to fill dead air.


You can't cure stupid.

Silver_warrior_max50

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 Really?


I won't be wronged, I won't be insulted, and I won't be laid a hand on. I don't do these things to other people and I expect the same from them.

John Bernard Books, from "The Shootist"

Just_passin__thru_max50

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And here is a cultural thing I do not understand. Please school me as to why this is.


When I have asked Hispanics in the past about where they live, the will regularly say to me that they 'barely' moved into that residence. Or 'barely hardly'.


Why? 


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1asteriskshield_ezr_max50

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TheSarge says ...



And here is a cultural thing I do not understand. Please school me as to why this is.


When I have asked Hispanics in the past about where they live, the will regularly say to me that they 'barely' moved into that residence. Or 'barely hardly'.


Why? 


 


 


 


Trying to sound edumacated?


 



You can't cure stupid.

373046_26738651698_2132900450_q_1__max50

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Rate This | Posted about 1 year ago

 

My wife and her friends used a phrase I do miss,although it was tantamont to saying the same thing.


Does anybody remember "Kinda Sorta", or is it simply commonplace in the heartland?

Female_bodysurfer_max50

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I've heard kinda sorta all over the place!  Kinda.  Sorta.  Not really.  Yeah!

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The word that drives me insane in a conversation. "Like". I feel that I, like, cannot have a conversation, like, with young people, like, without them using the word, like.

Just_passin__thru_max50

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Well, out here in the land of weirdness, The Left Coast, 'kinda sorta' is still out there but it appears to be used deliberately rather than unconsciously. The most continued venacular innovations are a proliferation of the following: (Could be constructed as a Top Ten list, I guess:


"Really?"


"Just sayin' .."


"Know what I mean?" 


"Dude" (Heck, I used 'dude' all the time.)


"Like.." [as has been previously mentioned]




Others?


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Mr-natural_1__max50

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Rate This | Posted about 1 year ago

 

Here's one that I use that I hate myself every time I use it:


"It's six of one, half a dozen of the other..."


Partly I hate it because it sounds so lame--and partly because it represents a dilemma for which I couldn't offer a good solution.




Bessie Braddock: “Sir, you are drunk.”
Churchill: “Madam, you are ugly. In the morning, I shall be sober.”

Female_bodysurfer_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 1 year ago

 

"No problem" for "you're welcome." Oh, it feels great to know I'm not a problem to you...this time. 


I also hate "no worries."  What, now alluva sudden you're my headshrinker??  lol

Just_passin__thru_max50

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"No worries." is a particular favorite of mine.


It helps when applied correctly.


When speaking it, I do try, at times, to put the Aussie accent. Something like 'now warys' or some such. 


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373046_26738651698_2132900450_q_1__max50

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Is this familiar to anybody?  "If I'm lieing I'm dieing"

Female_bodysurfer_max50

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Dude.  I still hate it.  Just say, "Please don't worry."  Let it all hang out.


TheSarge says ...



"No worries." is a particular favorite of mine.


It helps when applied correctly.


When speaking it, I do try, at times, to put the Aussie accent. Something like 'now warys' or some such. 


Female_bodysurfer_max50

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That sounds like a jailbird.  lol


SE851 says ...



Is this familiar to anybody?  "If I'm lieing I'm dieing"


Bronzestarribbon_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 1 year ago

 

"Actually to tell you the truth" at least its not as annoying as "Whatever' and Like you know".  "Ya feel me", even worse because I don't want to do that...

20140808_191221_max50

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MarlyB says ...



"No problem" for "you're welcome." Oh, it feels great to know I'm not a problem to you...this time. 


I also hate "no worries."  What, now alluva sudden you're my headshrinker??  lol



Hahaha. At my work (in the retail industry) I find myself saying "Not a problem" after a customer says "Thank you." I guess I need to start saying "You're welcome!" more.


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