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Department Prospecting

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Patrol_max50

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Posted about 1 year ago

 

 In this upcoming year I will be graduating and will begin researching police departments in both Canada and the US to apply for. As I have mentioned in other posts I am a dual citizen, 4 year university grad, 4 yr infantry and 1 tour to Afghanistan.


I am looking for suggestions from the men and women who have already been through the leo application process and joining various departments. So basically what I am hoping for is when you think back to your first leo application and job, what questions did you wish you asked or certain research that you wished you had done when looking back? Any tips/pointers?


Thanks in advance

Just_passin__thru_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 1 year ago

 

The big question that is problematic is how an officer is paid. Applications will usually give you a monthly salary or a yearly salary.


You need to ask if you will be paid twice a month OR once every two weeks, .... 26 paydays in a year, if paid every two weeks.


This is the math quiz: An agency says they will pay such-n-such per month and they say they pay every two weeks. This is what you do.


Take the monthly salary and multiply it by 12. Once you have this total, divide it by 26. The final number will be the gross amount you will see every two weeks.


All you have to do is determine if you can live with that final total. Make sure to consider taxes, benefits deductions, association deductions, etc in the proposed take home amount.


The Guy !
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Schultz3_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 1 year ago

 

If you apply for various departments, take time to get to know some information about the department you are applying or interviewing for. It is embarrassing to ask people why they want to work for your department and hear they know absolutely nothing about your city or department. Departments want people who are going to stick around for a few years. Knowing about the department will show you do have some care about the city and are not looking for a first step into your agency of choice.

Just_passin__thru_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 1 year ago

 

You'll need to be creative with asking these questions: How long do people stay with the agency and what is the seniority status between different employees.


For instance, if detective Bob has been with the agency for, say, 20 years and there is a big gap between him and the next guy. Officer Ryan is been there only 3 years. Why is there such a big seniority gap? Does it mean that the agency is just a stepping stone for officers to get there feet wet and then move on?


Next, you need to know what the relationship with the department is with the City Manager (or equivalent) and the department. For counties and parishes, this would be the Board of Supervisors (or equivalent). This is important to know. If the agency has an adversarial relationship with these city or county heads, then morale and resources could be in the dumpster at the agency.


Keep in mind, you might be putting your best foot forward to get hired. The same goes for police departments. They are not going to tell you what problems they have. They will put on a smile and infer that you NEED to work for that agency. The problems are never published but can be discovered in part in the local newspaper. A search on the internet can let you know what problems the agency is working through. Although newspapers and internet news services do need to be taken with a huge grain of salt, there is a kernel of accuracy in what they might report. Just a kernel, mind you.


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Csi_squirrle_max600_1__max50

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Rate This | Posted about 1 year ago

 

 LIke othes have suggested do some research into the department prior to the interview.  Try to find something recent that invovled the department.  For example if they just remodled the offices, or got new equipment or computers.  Work a comment into the interview such as: I read that you got new reporting software, how's the transition going?  Anything that shows you have an interest in the department and have done some research will be good.  This is especially effective if one of the individuals in the interview was integral in the change.  I would steer clear of pay and benefit questions they should wait until you get an offer.  

Fall_2007_027__2__max50

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Rate This | Posted about 1 year ago

 

 I would also consider the career opportunities that a Department will able to offer you and what goals you have for yourself.


for example: a small agency may provide you with an opportunity to be a jack-of-all-trades because a patrol officer does everything (preliminary investigation, dust for prints, crime scene photos, etc) a large one may let you have a specialty.


a small agency may not offer as many promotional opportunities (fewer sworn, so fewer sgts, Lts or detective positions) but then again may rotate staff through patrol and investigative assignments regularly.


a large department, covering a large geographic area,may offer more variety for restless person,but a smaller one maybe more suited to you because you'll really get to know the people.


So ask yourself...can I work here, in this town, for this department, for 25 years?

Patrol_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 1 year ago

 

 Excellent responses guys, I appreciate it. 


Am I correct in assuming that a face to face interview is a mandatory step in all departments?


So flights from here in MI to any department I apply for should be expected. $$$

Texas02n_max600_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 1 year ago

 

looms22 says ...



 Excellent responses guys, I appreciate it. 


Am I correct in assuming that a face to face interview is a mandatory step in all departments?


So flights from here in MI to any department I apply for should be expected. $$$



Never assume anything!


"Niether fire nor wind, birth nor death can erase our good deeds." Buddha

Just_passin__thru_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 1 year ago

 

looms22 says ...



 Excellent responses guys, I appreciate it. 


Am I correct in assuming that a face to face interview is a mandatory step in all departments?


So flights from here in MI to any department I apply for should be expected. $$$


 


++++++++++++++++++++


If you are applying for an out of state agency, then when you apply let them know where you are currently living. You might be surprised.


I have seen agencies do interviews over the phone. Who knows,... Skype may currently be an option. When it comes to things they need to see you in person about, they may arrange to have all of it done in a day or two versus over a period of weeks.


Just ask the questions. They may accommodate you, ... they may not. Ask!


Caveat: If you're planning on working in another state, you're going to have to sell yourself a little bit harder to get an agency to believe you are relocating to stay. Also, the normal question that arises is, "Why are you leaving your state? Are you in trouble?"



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