General Forums >> General Discussions >> OFFICER SAFETY WHILE DRIVING

+3

OFFICER SAFETY WHILE DRIVING

386 Views
13 Replies Flag as inappropriate
Somegiveall_max160_max160_max50

1362 posts

back to top

Posted about 1 year ago

 

When i was a young police officer looking to make arrests and trying to be pro-active in researching things like crime statistics, modus operandi of crtiminals, active crime locations, most active criminal times and days of week etc, i became aware of certain things that i would read that seem to jump out at me and cause me alarm.


After post condolences just this day to a fine Pennsylvania State Trooper who passed in the line of duty,  Cause of death? Motor Vehicle Accident. Does anyone here immediately recall how many condonlences we have typed for our brothers and sisters who have lost their lives just driving their vehicles while on duty.  This is not about responding lights and sirens, pedal down, going to asist a fellow officer in a call for assistance, this is driving everyday doing what we do, vehicle patrol.


Here are the statistics for 2000 thru present date (less the last few weeks) Total law enforcement officers killed by gunfire #723           


Total law enforcement officers killed in Motor Vehicle Accidents #480.  These numbers do not include vehicle assaults, being struck by a vehicle, motorcycle accidents. 


ALMOST TWO THIRDS OF OUR LAW ENFORCEMENT LOSSES ARE CAUSED BY CAR ACCIDENTS. THIS IS AND AS WELL SHOULD BE UNACCEPTABLE TO ALL OF US.


The engine size  nor make of your vehicle, its color or fancy decals, slick roof or light bar, blue or red lights, even if you may have been lucky enough to have been provided with emergency response driving instruction makes you safer.  It is not the braveness of your heart or how many medals your chest bears, rookie or old timer.  Nothing makes your vehicle tires grab more than others, nothing makes your vehicle corner better than others, nothing makes your vehicle not slide on ice or on wet pavement better than others.  Please do not become one of these sickening statistics.  Slow down, be aware, take nothing for granted, always assume the worst. When responding to an emergency incident it does not help if you do not get there at all and other fellow officers have to respond to assist you (been there on both ends).


Hope this strikes some of you in the heart because this is where my message is coming from, my heart. STAY SAFE OUT THERE MY BROTHERS AND SISTERS.

Pl1_max50

759 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted about 1 year ago

 

MIKIESPLACE says ...



When i was a young police officer looking to make arrests and trying to be pro-active in researching things like crime statistics, modus operandi of crtiminals, active crime locations, most active criminal times and days of week etc, i became aware of certain things that i would read that seem to jump out at me and cause me alarm.


After post condolences just this day to a fine Pennsylvania State Trooper who passed in the line of duty,  Cause of death? Motor Vehicle Accident. Does anyone here immediately recall how many condonlences we have typed for our brothers and sisters who have lost their lives just driving their vehicles while on duty.  This is not about responding lights and sirens, pedal down, going to asist a fellow officer in a call for assistance, this is driving everyday doing what we do, vehicle patrol.


Here are the statistics for 2000 thru present date (less the last few weeks) Total law enforcement officers killed by gunfire #723           


Total law enforcement officers killed in Motor Vehicle Accidents #480.  These numbers do not include vehicle assaults, being struck by a vehicle, motorcycle accidents. 


ALMOST TWO THIRDS OF OUR LAW ENFORCEMENT LOSSES ARE CAUSED BY CAR ACCIDENTS. THIS IS AND AS WELL SHOULD BE UNACCEPTABLE TO ALL OF US.


The engine size  nor make of your vehicle, its color or fancy decals, slick roof or light bar, blue or red lights, even if you may have been lucky enough to have been provided with emergency response driving instruction makes you safer.  It is not the braveness of your heart or how many medals your chest bears, rookie or old timer.  Nothing makes your vehicle tires grab more than others, nothing makes your vehicle corner better than others, nothing makes your vehicle not slide on ice or on wet pavement better than others.  Please do not become one of these sickening statistics.  Slow down, be aware, take nothing for granted, always assume the worst. When responding to an emergency incident it does not help if you do not get there at all and other fellow officers have to respond to assist you (been there on both ends).


Hope this strikes some of you in the heart because this is where my message is coming from, my heart. STAY SAFE OUT THERE MY BROTHERS AND SISTERS.


 


BIG BUMP.


Also this is being addressed as part of the below 100 officer safety Initiative across the nation but we still feel the necessity in driving too fast when not required. WHY ALSO WEAR YOUR SEATBELT.



John 15:13 Greater love has no one than this: to lay down one’s life for one’s friends.

Fall_2007_027__2__max50

199 posts

back to top
+1

Rated +1 | Posted about 1 year ago

 

 My first FTO gave me a lesson on driving which went something like this:


FTO - "Put these words in proper order"


there


first


get


FTO - "It's the key to being a good at your job, being universally respected by peers and supervisors"


He taught me that the wrong answer was, "get there first" and showed me the right answer was always going to be, "first, get there."

Rcsd04_max600_max50

657 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted about 1 year ago

 

 Bump!! 


Just had a vehicle pursuit  this past sunday night (My first). Thanks for passing along this info. I ride with some guys that refuse to put their seat belt on just cause they want to be able to bail out or be able to move around. Sad but its what they do. When I drive I am too careful. I hate to do anything that will wreck the car or damage the car or do any damage to myself. I use the laptop only when I really really need to, like my gut is saying run that tag!!! Personally I think we talk to much on those computers about peronal things or about cases that can be discussed over the phone. Gotta start driving more smart and be more observant. 


You wouldn't go in there for a million bucks...A Cop does it for less...A Reserve does it for free....

Wredcedar_max50

1242 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted about 1 year ago

 

Far too many officers do not use their seatbelts.  It is not hard to unfasten a seatbelt just prior to arriving at a call if you feel the need to be unbelted.  So many of the officers killed were ejected on crashing, suggesting that they weren't belted in at the time of the crash.  We have had 3 rookies strart in the last 18 or so months and all 3 of them fastened the seatbelt behind the seat so the belt warning will not sound rather that wear their seatbelt.

Picture__sue_patrol_001_sq90_max50

65 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted about 1 year ago

 

LEO's are much better drivers than the general public---goes w/o saying---but they're still human, and the ones who don't use seatbelts IMHO are asking for it---even if the accident isn't due to their error---there are still "crazies" and "drunks" that can cause them to crash and "eject".  This IS something that needs to be talked about more.  The statistics are deplorable---more so, because they could've been prevented. 

Eagle_and_flag_max50

7879 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted about 1 year ago

 

You don't do anyone any good if you don't get there! Case in point: Several years ago, my Department had an officer in foot pursuit of a known felon. Several people responded, including myself and another officer - both of us leaving from station. In the blink of an eye, another car pulled out in front of me and I ended up in a parking lot:



The other officer that left station behind me stopped to assist me. Both of us were now effectively out of the foot pursuit equation.


Most stories have a happy ending. Bad guy got caught and I walked away from this with little injury.


 


Like Metro said: "First, get there!"


In GOD We Trust (All others get searched, then checked through NCIC)

MODERATOR #10

Photobucket

IN HONOR OF OUR FALLEN

Suit_max50

490 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted about 1 year ago

 

 Talking about how not even the emergency lights make you safer reminds me of one of the things I was told.  Officers would tell me that for some reason or another the blue lights worked the same as a bug zapper (more so for the drunks than sober but not completely).  I say the blue lights because no matter what department or stats I looked at, it happens more (at least around here in Florida) to Deputeys and State Troopers because they just have blue lights and don't alternate between red/blue.  That may be because without the alternation, it just becomes a trance.  I asked a deputey once about a single yellow light I started to notice on the light bars and he said it was designed to break the "trance" that the blue lights caused.  Whether that's true or not I don't know.

-24 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted about 1 year ago

 

I found that my safety factor was I prayed a lot while my partner was driving.

Schultz3_max50

406 posts

back to top
+1

Rated +1 | Posted about 1 year ago

 

In regards to the "getting stuck on the seatbelt" issue. The only people who get caught are those who do not regularly wear a seatbelt. Some officers say they will wear a seatbelt if they get into a pursuit. Well, they are not used to wearing it, so when they stop and bail out of the car, they get stuck. I always wear my seatbelt. When I have to bail out of the vehicle, I do so with ease, because I always wear it. When I train officers, I always have a contest on who can get out of the vehicle quickest and properly. I always win, even when I'm buckled in and they are not. It may seem silly, but I practice doing it. Anything you can train for in this job to give you a few seconds reaction time advantage over bad guys is worth the time.

Quickley-b240_max50

9540 posts

back to top
+1

Rated +1 | Posted about 1 year ago

 

When I first started we never wore seatbelts, you would plant your left foot hard against the floorboard and hall a$$, it only took one time of my car flying 100 feet through the air, after I hit a small culvert and my ending up in the passenger seat, for me to start wearing one.


"The hottest places in hell are reserved for those who, in times of moral crisis, do nothing." Dante

MODERATOR #2
PL Mentoring Team Member

Photobucket Honoring Our Fallen

Images_7a8ec2bec1e1bf7f38b54b52a8c9c453_max50

77 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted about 1 year ago

 

just finished driving school refresher week ago> we are the most distracted drivers on the road but the most well trained. Know limits of your car and driving>ALL Stay Focused Stay Safe

Wredcedar_max50

1242 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted about 1 year ago

 

schultzy04 says ...



In regards to the "getting stuck on the seatbelt" issue. The only people who get caught are those who do not regularly wear a seatbelt. Some officers say they will wear a seatbelt if they get into a pursuit. Well, they are not used to wearing it, so when they stop and bail out of the car, they get stuck. I always wear my seatbelt. When I have to bail out of the vehicle, I do so with ease, because I always wear it. When I train officers, I always have a contest on who can get out of the vehicle quickest and properly. I always win, even when I'm buckled in and they are not. It may seem silly, but I practice doing it. Anything you can train for in this job to give you a few seconds reaction time advantage over bad guys is worth the time.



this. And since pursuits are not-pre scheduled, I doubt if you would have the time to fasten your seatbelt safely once in a pursuit.  Same applies to accidents, you don't pre schedule or know they are coming in time to fasten your seatbelt.