General Forums >> Law Enforcement Careers >> Situational panel questions

+2

Situational panel questions

2,157 Views
9 Replies Flag as inappropriate
Photo_user_blank_big

3 posts

back to top

Posted almost 2 years ago

 

 Hello police linkers,


I recently had an oral interview that completely caught me off guard. They asked little about me and focused heavily on situational questions. 


2 questions that I wanted some opinions are:


1. You arrive at a distress call at a school and upon arrival a man points a gun at you. What do you do? And what if it were a 12 year old pointing it at you?


2. Superior officer orders you to do something that will break policy. What do you do? And what if the order breaks the law?


I failed this interview. I'm not sure what exactly got me, but these two stood out in my mind. 

Csi_squirrle_max600_1__max50

1471 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted almost 2 years ago

 

 How did you reply to these questions??

Cop_max50

15 posts

back to top
+1

Rated +1 | Posted almost 2 years ago

 

I wasn't there and I don't know you so there's a lot of information unavailable for me to comment on but here goes:


Sounds like these two interview questions were explorations of your decision making process. They want to know if you have considered such scenarios that might face you someday as a police officer. The operative words which stand out to me here are, "caught me off guard." Those need to disappear from your vocabulary if you want be successful in law enforcement. The reality is nobody knows for sure until that first moment comes... especially deadly force. But you can demonstrate to a panel that you have thought out the process. You can show you understand all the parameters of using deadly force against an imminent threat of death or serious bodily injury even against a non-typical aggressor. It is not a matter of simply answering "Oh yeah, I got no problem with shootin' 12 year olds!" You'd fail THAT interview as well. If by chance you already have combat experience its not the time to rely on it as the answer they seek. They aren't looking for proven shooters or someone who is committed to doing it in the future... just that they can trust someone to understand the process and articulate it justifiably later in court. Make sense?


As for the other question it seems they wanted to test your understanding of vicarious liability; another big part of the job. Basically anything outside the scope of the law and department policy and everybody is going down together, getting fired or going to jail... You can show you've thought of this by answering authority can't over-ride established department procedures and policy or legal statutes. You're not going to obey anything contrary what is already set up to protect the department or the community.


Hope this helps and good luck to you in the future.

Photo_user_blank_big

3 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted almost 2 years ago

 

mmmm says ...



 How did you reply to these questions??


 


1. Give verbal command and take out adult suspect. For the child, assess if the he/she has full bearing of what they're doing and use less than lethal means. If the child is aware of what they're doing with finger on the trigger, eliminate them. 


2. One both accounts perform the order asked of me then seek justification after. Also dependent upon the circumstances. 


Photo_user_blank_big

3 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted almost 2 years ago

 

OneXray10 says ...



I wasn't there and I don't know you so there's a lot of information unavailable for me to comment on but here goes:


Sounds like these two interview questions were explorations of your decision making process. They want to know if you have considered such scenarios that might face you someday as a police officer. The operative words which stand out to me here are, "caught me off guard." Those need to disappear from your vocabulary if you want be successful in law enforcement. The reality is nobody knows for sure until that first moment comes... especially deadly force. But you can demonstrate to a panel that you have thought out the process. You can show you understand all the parameters of using deadly force against an imminent threat of death or serious bodily injury even against a non-typical aggressor. It is not a matter of simply answering "Oh yeah, I got no problem with shootin' 12 year olds!" You'd fail THAT interview as well. If by chance you already have combat experience its not the time to rely on it as the answer they seek. They aren't looking for proven shooters or someone who is committed to doing it in the future... just that they can trust someone to understand the process and articulate it justifiably later in court. Make sense?


As for the other question it seems they wanted to test your understanding of vicarious liability; another big part of the job. Basically anything outside the scope of the law and department policy and everybody is going down together, getting fired or going to jail... You can show you've thought of this by answering authority can't over-ride established department procedures and policy or legal statutes. You're not going to obey anything contrary what is already set up to protect the department or the community.Hope this helps and good luck to you in the future.


 


thank you for this reply. I now have a better understanding of what they were looking for. 


Nqdz7m_max50

8530 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted almost 2 years ago

 

1.  I would have said eliminate the threats.  That means using deadly force as required. As to the kid, however, provided I had sufficient time and cover and nobody else was in danger- I would warn him, try to talk him into setting the weapon down and walking away.  If he persists as threat, wing him, etc. whatever it takes to eliminate the threat.


2.  In both cases I would 'call home' - notify commanding officer for advisement before proceeding.


But heck what do I know?  I'm a civilian with no interest in being a cop!

Images_max50

6021 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted almost 2 years ago

 

As usual, good answers. 'Specially OneXray10.


Here are mine:


1. 'Stop' the threat(s). It would require the oral panel to ask you to explain.


2. If the order is illegal, immoral or unethical, you have no obligation to do the thing. Purposely violating policy falls within 'illegal'.


The Guy !
Photobucket

Honoring the Fallen

Cop_max50

15 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted almost 2 years ago

 

The Jonesboro, Arkansas school shooting at Westside Middle School really stands out in my mind. On March 24, 1998, two students, 13 year old Mitchell Johnson and 11 year old Andrew Golden shot and killed 5 and wounded 10 after triggering a fire alarm to send students outside into their kill zone. They were apprehended with a stockpile of 13 firearms and over 200 rounds in a stolen van loaded with food and camping gear. Johnson had previously been suspended 3 times and also criminally charged with molesting a 2 year old girl. I'm 48 so these are children to me but totally lethal and committed. There's no way you can discern who you could or couldn't engage successfully in any negotiation attempt in the midst of a school shooting scenario. A firearm pointed at you or someone else needs to be addressed immediately.


Wing shooting: Police are trained to shoot center-mass. Unlike military combat a police officer must account for and justify every round they fire downrange. Deadly force is deadly force and the courts, juries and attorneys both civil and criminal will not differentiate a bullet fired to wound or one centered on a threat. I know of one incident where a wing shot was attempted on a subject armed with a sword... The brachial artery was struck and the hit was quickly fatal. So in a nutshell wingshooting is contrary to any police firearms training, just as deadly by its execution but more likely to generate a miss and that puts you behind the curve in a gunfight which is no place to be.


I did like MarlyB's answer on #2 about calling supervisors. I hated being the last to know or worse when a superior asked me about something and I had no idea something had gone down...  


Good advice Marly!

Nqdz7m_max50

8530 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted almost 2 years ago

 

Thank you, OneX and knowing all that I would still try to wing the nipper if that was an option.