General Forums >> The Lobby >> A message from Anonymous+++ Your Thoughts Please+++

Rate

A message from Anonymous+++ Your Thoughts Please+++

1,179 Views
22 Replies Flag as inappropriate
Quickley-b240_max50

9458 posts

back to top

Posted over 1 year ago

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nG_u9TbzRwA&sns=em


"The hottest places in hell are reserved for those who, in times of moral crisis, do nothing." Dante

MODERATOR #2
PL Mentoring Team Member

Photobucket Honoring Our Fallen

Silver_warrior_max50

1463 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted over 1 year ago

 

I would like to think that I am not quite that far along, but when one looks at what the government has its fingers in. . . . .it is becoming harder and harder not to wonder how true something like this is.  We can look at what history has shown us in regards to the letters written back and forth between the founding fathers to get a "behind the scenes" look at what they were concerned about. . . .which if applied to today, one could see some similarities to the concerns that are being voiced by people today.


I'm not real clear on the history of the Federal Reserve, but what I do know is that many of the founding fathers did not want a private bank to have control over the government's money. . . . .which is exactly what we have now.  But it you look at the original design, the Congress was supposed to be in control of the government's money.  I guess it is just like anything else, if you don't want to be bothered by the minutia of something. . . . .you create another government agency to do your job.  Because of that nonfeasance, we now have a non-government group of people that now decide what our money is worth (among other things) with only a simple nod by those that were charged with that task.


I won't be wronged, I won't be insulted, and I won't be laid a hand on. I don't do these things to other people and I expect the same from them.

John Bernard Books, from "The Shootist"

2013_police_academy_graduation_beverage_pitcher-rfbcce87685664b4aad274d761cee8c6d_2wnov_8byvr_324_max50

142 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted over 1 year ago

 

The government is made up of the people.  These people are crazy.  How would a revolution serve "the people?"


"And maybe just remind the few, if ill of us they speak, that we are all that stands between the monsters and the weak." Michael Marks

Quickley-b240_max50

9458 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted over 1 year ago

 

bump


"The hottest places in hell are reserved for those who, in times of moral crisis, do nothing." Dante

MODERATOR #2
PL Mentoring Team Member

Photobucket Honoring Our Fallen

Female_bodysurfer_max50

7921 posts

back to top
+1

Rated +1 | Posted over 1 year ago

 

OK. I'll bite.  You know I'm analytical.  You know I always look at the formal elements.  This one is a p*sser.


Another slick ad for anarchy - with Anonymous' characteristic twist. The ideology, brand and spokesman are all one thing.  Like a brand in search of a product.  A vector in search of a host.  Anonymous homes in on American paranoia like a heat-seeking missile.  Candy from a baby.   Anonymous is schooled.


BRANDING ANARCHY


Anonymous' ad campaign contains a "Hollywood Blockbuster" counter-message.  It’s like Anonymous got bought up by Sony. 


Anonymous targets video-game playing hackers interested in bumping it up a notch and...ideological tag-alongs.  That's a HUGE demographic. In "A Message from Anonymous" the director capitalizes on the creepy monolithic menace of games culture aesthetic. A cartoony omnipotent figure in monk's robes and a Guy Fawkes mask drones out an indictment of the US government for abrogating our Constitution.  He points out our hallowed revolutionary history.   Symphonic swells rise and fall. Anonymous issues a fatwah against government-ordered gun confiscation.  Bingo. A putsch-back against imminent totalitarian assault.


"Message" is totalitarian aesthetic on steroids.  It conjures up the Minutemen in the collective American breast, but offers no Midnight Ride to thunder down. Rather, Anonymous has only an MTVish Youtube Lantern to wag to its No Resolution Revolution.   An uber open-ended war.  An ideology adrift in the ether.  The Fog of Hacktivism.


Yet...somehow the message weasels in.  Dunno.  Maybe its the whole ‘every man deserves to run his pants up the flag-pole once in his life’ kind of thing?  Or maybe…it’s just another liberal prank to make the NRA look bad?  Or maybe it's those pesky grains of truth a'pilin' up? 


Did I mention paranoia?  Welcome to MY nightmare...


ANONYMOUS


Starring JOHNNY DEPP


Crumb_passin_thru_02_1__max50

2163 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted over 1 year ago

 

I'm not a fan of Anonymous. I roll my eyes whenever they present as though they are an "organization"--like having their own "official" channel on Youtube, etcetera. There are no initiations, rules, or leaders. Anonymous isn't a "group", per se, it's a loose set of principles that has no hierarchy. Anybody can hook their wagon to the train and proclaim "EXPECT US!" Sure, it looks like someone has some slick marketing skills--but to what end? The nature of this beast is that eventually someone is going to do something truly abhorrent in the "group"'s name. At best, this is a social club for hackers and wannabe hackers to say, "me too!" It turns my stomach.


That's my take on the messenger...now the message... Maybe there are grains of truth piling up as Marly says, but I think Anonymous is using it as a smokescreen for something else...and I doubt it's about making the NRA look bad, but who knows?




Bessie Braddock: “Sir, you are drunk.”
Churchill: “Madam, you are ugly. In the morning, I shall be sober.”

582602_3283682777720_334551836_n_max50

1700 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted over 1 year ago

 

Bump MZ 


Not to say they may not throw out some good points here and there but....


Their beginning to resemble a Mom trying to shop with too many kids in tow.  The Mom's trying  to steer them all in one direction, but the kids see strategically placed items in the store and they get distracted.  Come to think of it, that's kinda how youtube works also if you let it.  One minute your listening to Music  then ..BAM!!....Your clicking on Half Goat Half Human found in INDIA!!


It's Ironic how just a little over a year ago when Anonymous attached itself to Occupy, they were belly aching about cops using pepper spray for crowd control, and having what they call "Military Style"  weapons.  They even put out PSA's via Youtube instructing protesters on how to properly film Officers and what their legalities are. 


If interested someone may want to Google:   "Anonymous vs Police" and/or "Shooting Sheriff Saturday"


Imho, they seem to be growing a number of weed smoking, shroom consuming oxycodone kids that are still butt hurt Ron Paul didn't free them from the agony of drug prohibition.  These kids (I hear this at work) have a different conspiracy theory every week, i.e. Illuminate, NWO and claim that the Newton Incident was staged with crisis actors.  This was based on what I call a "re-photo-shopped" photo, when I saw it I just said "seriously?".


 


What doesn't kill me had better start running!

Crumb_passin_thru_02_1__max50

2163 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted over 1 year ago

 

Oh, man, Lonna--I heard about that Newton conspiracy theory. Disgusting. As bad as when crackpots claim Bush let WTC get hit so he could advance the Patriot Act or other somesuch disgusting suggestion.




Bessie Braddock: “Sir, you are drunk.”
Churchill: “Madam, you are ugly. In the morning, I shall be sober.”

Female_bodysurfer_max50

7921 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted over 1 year ago

 

 


THE HEADLESS STATE - CYBERSPACE



The Anonymous Black Ops Emblem uses Man From Uncle-ish Cold War iconography.  It carries a double message.  The Empty Suit, a headless 'Man in Black',  seems to taunt the FBI and Global CEOs.  He is both Hunter and Prey.  Is this an intended message?  You tell me.


PRANKING THE MAN



 


 


The Guy Fawkes mask japes The Man.  It's a 'How do you like me NOW!" self-congratulatory smirk.  The hacktivist can don it to document threats, crow operational success AND recruit.  A messenger to be shrugged off?  The FBI doesn't think so.


 I believe Time Warner announced it had rights to the mask and claims Anonymous is infringing copyright.  If so, aptly, Anonymous operates under cover of a stolen mask.


Anonymous.  Frozen in the gloat mode.  Prankin' in the Deep Web.


 


ANONYMOUS AS ROBIN HOOD??



 THE VIGILANTE COMMON-SOURCER


Anonymous is a headless, fluid ideological association of independently-engaged, like-minded individuals and groups that conduct criminal activities.  Anonymous markets its 'rage against the machine' ideology to recruit the disenfranchised, the malicious and the mischievous alike. 


Anonymous markets vigilantism in the 'heroic common mission' to infiltrate and tear down corporate and government agency infrastructure as revenge for perceived corporate and government agency injustices.  By any means necessary. 


The FBI is very interested in hacktivist illegal activities - particularly Anonymous - whose manifesto calls for an ongoing criminal disruption or destruction of the 'grid'', so to speak, under the aegis of lofty ideals that challenge information-hoarding in the form of proprietary use and copyright by corporate and governmental entities on the internet.  Anonymous is understood by law enforcement in terms of similar organizational characteristics to a terrorist organization.  At least in terms of recruitment and operations,  organizational parallels can be drawn between Anonymous and Al Qaeda.


Anonymous means business.  So does the FBI.

Female_bodysurfer_max50

7921 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted over 1 year ago

 

 


AARON, AVENGED?


   


Photo From: http://freeculture.org/blog/2013/01/27/how-to-honor-aaron-swartz/


"RELEASING PUBLIC DOMAIN DOCUMENTS BY OUTSOURCING"


From Wiki: "On January 6, 2011, Swartz was arrested by federal authorities in connection with systematic downloading of academic journal articles from JSTOR.[8][9] Swartz opposed JSTOR’s practice of compensating publishers, rather than authors, out of the fees it charges for access to articles. Swartz contended that JSTOR’s fees were limiting public access to academic work that was being supported by public funding.


On January 11, 2013, Swartz was found dead in his Crown Heights, Brooklyn apartment where he had hanged himself."


See Also: Memorial Global Hackathons: 


http://bostonherald.com/business/technology/technology_news/2013/01/global_%E2%80%98hackathon%E2%80%99_set_tribute_swartz


And:  http://chronicle.com/blogs/wiredcampus/jstor-opens-up-u-s-journal-content-from-before-1923/33057



**************************************************************** 


ANONYMOUS THREATENS JUSTICE DEPARTMENT OVER HACKTIVIST DEATH 

By Ben Brumfield, CNN

updated 10:03 AM EST, Sun January 27, 2013 |


See video and read story here: http://www.cnn.com/2013/01/26/tech/anonymous-threat/index.html


(CNN) -- In anger over the recent death of an Internet activist who faced federal charges, hackers claiming to be from the group Anonymous threatened early Saturday to release sensitive information about the U.S. Department of Justice.


They claimed to have one such file on multiple servers ready for immediate release.


The hackers hijacked the website of the U.S. government agency responsible for federal sentencing guidelines, where they posted a message demanding the United States reform its justice system or face incriminating leaks to select news outlets.


The lengthy, eloquently written letter was signed "Anonymous."


Richard McFeely, executive assistant director of the FBI's Criminal, Cyber, Response, and Services Branch, said the bureau was immediately aware of the threat and is "handling it as a criminal investigation."


"We are always concerned when someone illegally accesses another person('s) or government agency's network," he said.


The U.S. Sentencing Commission said its website was brought down "temporarily" before it was restored later Saturday. "The commission's publications, training materials and federal sentencing statistics are again readily accessible to visitors to the site," it said in a statement.


The suicide of Internet activist Aaron Swartz on January 11 triggered the posting of the hackers' message to the web address of the sentencing commission, they said.


His death, which they blamed on the justice system, "crossed a line," the letter said.


A YouTube video accompanied the message, and made use of images from Cold War nuclear scenarios and games of strategy. The letter contained nuclear metaphors to refer to chunks of embarrassing information.


The hackers said they have obtained "enough fissile material for multiple warheads," which it would launch against the Justice Department and "its associated executive branches."


It gave the "warheads" the names of U.S. Supreme Court justices.


Anonymous accused the FBI of infiltrating its ranks and claimed the federal government is applying "highly disproportionate sentencing" to ruin the lives of some of its members.


Swartz, 26, was facing federal computer fraud charges and could have served 35 years in prison. Anonymous said he "was killed," because he "faced an impossible choice."


His family has issued a statement saying that federal charges filed over allegations that he stole millions of online documents contributed to Swartz's decision to take his own life. The files were mostly scholarly papers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.


Swartz's suicide has inspired a flurry of online tributes and mobilized Anonymous, the loosely defined collective of so-called "hacktivists" who oppose attempts to limit Internet freedoms. Both Swartz and Anonymous have been stark proponents of open access to information and open-source programming.


A review of a cached version of the USSC.gov website showed the Anonymous message on its homepage early Saturday.


Anonymous also posted an editable version of the website, inviting users to deface it as they pleased. Multiple pages -- not only the home page -- appeared to allow users to alter them.


The "warhead" names appeared as links, most leading to 404 error messages of pages not found, but some leading to pages of raw programming code.


The hackers said they chose the commission's website because of its influence on the doling out of sentences they consider to be unfair.



Female_bodysurfer_max50

7921 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted over 1 year ago

 

1/29/2013


Anonymous' recent threat to the Department of Justice was ignited by 26 yo Aaron Swartz' recent suicide.  Below is CNN's account of Swartz' contribution to the Internet and differing views on the gravity of his criminal activities.  Swartz downloaded millions of articles from JSTOR and faced a 1 mil fine and 35 years imprisonment.  According to CNN, JSTOR did not press charges...




HOW AARON SWARTZ HELPED BUILD THE INTERNET

   

By Todd Leopold, CNN

updated 9:53 AM EST, Tue January 15, 2013 | Filed under: Web





(CNN) -- Aaron Swartz helped create the Internet.


Maybe not the Internet foundations of ARPANET and TCP/IP and Mosaic, the codes and packets and standards on which the whole thing is based. But he was a factor in fashioning some of the Web's upper floors. With his contributions to RSS coding and the Web application framework, Swartz made some of today's more expansive Internet possible.


But what Swartz also helped create was a philosophy of the Internet, one that remains the subject of great controversy almost 20 years into its life: the libertarian idea that information wants to be free.


"Aaron was a genius," said Christopher Soghoian, principal technologist and a senior policy analyst at the ACLU. "He was a technologist who was committed to open access to information, and committed to bringing about the changes he believed in."


"Aaron was an embodiment of the Web, and a contributor to many of the aspects that made it great," said Matt Mullenweg, who founded the blogging platform WordPress, in a statement. "When I was young and getting into technology Aaron was even younger and literally setting the standards for the Web with contributions to RSS 1.0 and Creative Commons. He inspired a generation to share online, to move to (San Francisco), to not be afraid to start things, and to break down barriers."

Swartz's friend: Government bullied him


Swartz died Friday of an apparent suicide in his apartment in Brooklyn, New York. He was 26.


Although Swartz's life was not without controversy -- he faced federal charges that he illegally downloaded millions of scholarly papers from MIT -- his death has been met with an outpouring of tributes and grief.


A Tumblr page was set up for people to express their thoughts and condolences. Friends and commenters there described him as "inspiring," "enthusiastic," "a hero," "shy," "a great technologist" -- a bright, inquisitive, creative, challenging personality who deeply affected those he touched.


Opinion: Why the Net grieves Aaron Swartz


"Such a brilliant, disciplined, well-spoken guy with a great sense of humor, who probably knew as much about 'Star Wars' mythology and trivia as he did about programming computers," wrote a member of Chicago Force, a "Star Wars" fan club, noting the shock of club members in 1999 when they met with the budding Web developer and discovered he was just 12 years old.


"Let his life be an inspiration to us all to keep fighting, to keep building a better world, where free expression and open standards become the norm for everyone," added Jan Zuppinger, who described himself as an "Internet Freedom Activist."


"World wanderers, we have lost a wise elder. Hackers for right, we are one down," said World Wide Web creator Tim Berners-Lee in a tweet.


'I want something new, something worthwhile, something better'


Swartz was apparently committed to such activism from an early age. He was born in Chicago, the son of a software company founder, and showed both intellect and restlessness at an early age.


"My name is Aaron Swartz," he wrote on a blog when he was a teenager, according to an entry on the Tumblr. (The actual blog post appears to be unavailable.) "I'm a 9th grader at the North Shore Country Day School. In the summer of 2000, I finally realized that school wasn't working. I decided to do something about it. ... I'm tired of outdated teaching practices where the students don't learn anything. I'm tired of constantly being prepared for more preparation. I want something new, something worthwhile, something better."


He would have been 13 at the time.


Swartz never really gravitated to old-fashioned schooling; after his blog note, he mainly studied at home. He enrolled at Stanford in 2004 but only stayed a year, saying he didn't find "a very intellectual atmosphere" on the campus at the edge of Silicon Valley. He later became a fellow at Harvard University's Ethics Center Lab on Institutional Corruption.


Swartz was a prodigy. By the time he was 14, he had co-written the specification for RSS -- originally Rich Site Summary, now Really Simple Syndication -- a Web-publishing technology for delivering syndicated content from frequently updated sites, such as blogs or news websites. RSS allows Web consumers to receive the latest stories on a feed without having to constantly revisit their favorite pages.


If you subscribe to a podcast -- or receive automatic updates from CNN.com -- you have Swartz to thank.


After leaving Stanford he created Infogami, which was later merged with Reddit, the freewheeling social-news site where users vote their favorite stories onto the main page. Reddit, which was purchased by Conde Nast in 2006, has come under fire for its anything-goes ethos. One popular Reddit moderator, who went by the name Violentacrez, was known for starting Reddit pages devoted to underage girls and violent fantasies. When his identity became known via a Gawker article, he was fired from his job.


Swartz was long gone from Reddit by then -- he was let go just after the Conde Nast purchase -- but believed in the ethos of the site and the open Internet in general.


"(He) engineered his own dismissal and got cashed out, and then became a full-time, uncompromising, reckless and delightful s***-disturber," wrote BoingBoing's Cory Doctorow, a friend of Swartz's, in a tribute.


One of Swartz's desires was to make public information truly public -- that is, free and easily available.


There's a government-run system, PACER, that allows the public to access court records online. However, PACER charged a fee for accessing this public-domain information. As Doctorow observed, Swartz "singlehandedly liberated 20% of U.S. law" by moving the information onto a public site, spending "a small fortune" of his own money doing so.


Later, Swartz founded Demand Progress, a group devoted to Internet activism. For all his success with programming, it's in this arena that he had the most impact, said Soghoian. Demand Progress was instrumental in fighting the Stop Online Piracy Act and the Protect IP Act, two bills that would have expanded government oversight in fighting Internet piracy and copyright violations at the possible expense of the free flow of information.


"He really, really believed that public information should be free and accessible to everyone," said Soghoian.


Suicide sparks talk about depression


'This was not serious computer hacking'


By the time SOPA and PIPA were shot down last year, Swartz had become entangled in another legal thicket surrounding free access to online data.


According to federal prosecutors, Swartz used MIT's computer networks to download more than 4 million articles from JSTOR, a digital library of academic journals, in 2010 and 2011. He was charged with wire fraud, computer fraud and other crimes, even though JSTOR declined to prosecute and urged the government to drop the case.


"What Aaron was accused of by the government (was) essentially a serious form of computer hacking," said Soghoian. If found guilty, Swartz could have been sentenced to up to 35 years in jail and a $1 million fine.


Soghoian was one of many observers surprised at the severity of the charges.


"These are the kinds of things you'd assume the government would use in a serious hacking case -- identity theft, millions of credit card numbers stolen, hacking into protected government databases or corporate networks," he said. "Aaron was accused of downloading too many articles from a website that anyone connected to the MIT network could log into.


"This was not serious computer hacking and the government didn't appear to differentiate between those kinds of activities."


(Continued Next Post)

Female_bodysurfer_max50

7921 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted over 1 year ago

 


(Continued from Previous Post CNN):


Prosecutors saw it differently. When Swartz was indicted in July 2011, U.S. Attorney Carmen M. Ortiz said, "Stealing is stealing whether you use a computer command or a crowbar, and whether you take documents, data or dollars. It is equally harmful to the victim whether you sell what you have stolen or give it away."


In the wake of Swartz's death, critics have been quick to cast blame. Harvard law professor Lawrence Lessig, an outspoken writer on Internet issues, titled a blog post "Prosecutor as bully."


"From the beginning the government worked as hard as it could to characterize what Aaron did in the most extreme and absurd way," he wrote. "Somehow, we need to get beyond the 'I'm right so I'm right to nuke you' ethics that dominates our time. That begins with one word: Shame."


Swartz's family was equally pointed.


"Aaron's death is not simply a personal tragedy. It is the product of a criminal justice system rife with intimidation and prosecutorial overreach. Decisions made by officials in the Massachusetts U.S. Attorney's office and at MIT contributed to his death," they said in a statement.


Christina DiIorio-Sterling, a spokeswoman for the U.S. Department of Justice, declined to comment to CNN on Swartz's case, citing respect for his family.


Soghoian, the ACLU's analyst, said he sees Swartz's death as a great loss. Swartz could have made a fortune as a start-up wizard or venture capitalist but instead he plowed what money he made into his activism, he said.


"Aaron is seen as a hero. He spent a lot of time working to make the Internet a more open place," Soghoian said. "We lost a really important person who changed the Internet in a positive way, and we all lose out by his departure."


Female_bodysurfer_max50

7921 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted over 1 year ago

 

Hey wait, doesn't the guy on the left look like the guy on the left?


 

Texas02n_max600_max50

316 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted over 1 year ago

 

MarlyB says ...



Hey wait, doesn't the guy on the left look like the guy on the left?


 



Just like the guy on the right looks like the guy on the right.


"Niether fire nor wind, birth nor death can erase our good deeds." Buddha

Female_bodysurfer_max50

7921 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted over 1 year ago

 

POST-SCRIPT


By the way, Bill - here's the link to my PL Forum Topic on Anonymous' hack-attack on the Westboro Baptist Church two years ago where, mid-confrontation, WHAMO!! Westboro's website went DARK.


http://policelink.monster.com/topics/80618-hacktivists-dismantle-westboro/posts


NOBODY but mz66 commented then, either.  Doesn't matter.  Y'all are law enforcement.  I, however can afford to say Anonymous' vigilante prank STILL delights me DESPITE having been...had...ideologically speaking...somewhere between -


 


"I'll defend to the death your right to say it!"


&


"The enemy of my enemy is my friend." 


Quickley-b240_max50

9458 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted over 1 year ago

 

I thank everyone for your input. Great reading!


"The hottest places in hell are reserved for those who, in times of moral crisis, do nothing." Dante

MODERATOR #2
PL Mentoring Team Member

Photobucket Honoring Our Fallen

Female_bodysurfer_max50

7921 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted over 1 year ago

 

Or, the guy in the middle looks like the guy on the left and the guy on the right.


rypete says ...



MarlyB says ...



Hey wait, doesn't the guy on the left look like the guy on the left?


 



Just like the guy on the right looks like the guy on the right.


14_max50

12 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted about 1 year ago

 

isn't this propaganda??

Rhayden

Quickley-b240_max50

9458 posts

back to top
+1

Rated +1 | Posted about 1 year ago

 

Rhayden50 says ...


isn't this propaganda??

Rhayden

any particular post? at least this thread is only 5 months old instead of years old.


"The hottest places in hell are reserved for those who, in times of moral crisis, do nothing." Dante

MODERATOR #2
PL Mentoring Team Member

Photobucket Honoring Our Fallen

14_max50

12 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted about 1 year ago

 

the video from anonymous I get a lot of stuff from a retire ICE (I assume you all know what this is, he had to explain it to me) and I get a lot of stuff like this guy has I don't know what to believe. SO I think this sort of stuff is to insight people to action this is good I reckon in a way but for some one like me I wouldn't know what to do I think the politicains get many emails letter and I dn't know what and they get so many do hey really read all the stuff that comes to them. Everyone tells you to write to your......... but what does it do I have seen some change but I don't know is it propaganda this guy is pushing

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nG_u9TbzRwA&sns=em

Rhayden

Suit_max50

490 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted about 1 year ago

 

 This kind of reminds me of one of the people I work with.  Everytime I come in to relieve him at work, he's always watching a video on youtube talking about how the FBI was behind JFK's assassination or how FEMA has mass body coffins for when martial law is declared.  Me on the other had, I think its interesting to think about these stories but when your looking under the bed for the conspiracy monster I begin to worry; not of the government but for your sanity/safety.

Female_bodysurfer_max50

7921 posts

back to top
+1

Rated +1 | Posted about 1 year ago

 

I posted my responses here when I was studying advertising -  branding in particular.  I was also studying terrorism.  As I wrote I was put in mind of elements of the Yippie Movement in the US.  


5 months later, I am not sure I agree with ALL of my own analysis.  lol