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New Gun Owner

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Posted almost 2 years ago

 

 Hello. I am new here having just joined today. This is my first post.


I just purchased a Remington 870 12 gauge short barrel shotgun for personal and home protection. I will be taking a training class shortly. The gun has a trigger lock and I have a steel cable secured lock box for the ammo. But, I have a lot of questions (and a 16 year old boy).I am also married and a female.


1. Where should I store the gun? 2. Should I keep it loaded? 3. If I keep it loaded, how many rounds should be in it? 4. Where should I store the lock box for the ammo? 5. Do I need a light?


I read a lot of these posts and I learned things that make a lot of sense...like storing the gun at night where you have to wake up and retrieve it and thus lessen the chance of shooting someone while you're half awake. Any other tips and advice would be welcome.


While I hope never to have to fire the gun, I want to make sure that I'm not fumbling around looking for ammo, loading, and unlocking if a bad guy is on the immediate horizon.


Thanks to everyone who might be able to help.


SV

Fall_2007_027__2__max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 2 years ago

 

1-20-13


You're likely to get a few more responses AFTER you post an introduction (first post and joined today)


http://policelink.monster.com/discussions/130-introductions/topics


You're also likely to get different answers/opinions to the exact same question. So here's mine:


1) Be a responsible gun owner.  When not in use, store it in a locked container such as gun safe or lock box that is bolted to the wall/floor;


2) Putting a trigger lock on it, may keep it from being immediately used, but it won't keep it from being removed from the home;


3) And a gun case is designed to protect the gun while travelling, so it is made to take the gun from the home (therefore it is insufficient for securing your gun at home);


4) "Hiding" it as a safety measure, whether loaded/unloaded...with/without a trigger lock, is irresponsible;


5) If you leave the house, it goes in the box.  Only you and spouse have combo/key to safe.


as for loaded/unloaded:  You'll learn the four basic gun-safety rules in class.  But number 1 is, treat all guns as if they are loaded.


I understand the perspective that it will do little good for home protection if stored unloaded,  or with a trigger lock, or in a safe... because you can't get/use it quickly.  But you can choose to store it differently (place/condition) when you are home verses when you are away.  But it must always be stored safely away from others that could get unintended access (whether you are home or not).


As for a light: basic firearm rule number 4 is: be sure of your target


That said, they can be expensive and somewhat difficult to use if you don't practice regularly with your equipment.  Your firearms safety class can help.


And you don't have to stop with a basic course, there are other training/learning opportunities out there.


 


 

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Rate This | Posted almost 2 years ago

 

To MetroRW30


Thank you. I am new to this type of forum so I didn't know about the introduction thing. I didn't mean to be rude.


Thank you too for all the information.The idea of storing it separately when home and not home is excellent and i will do that. I will also get the light and a case and a safe...tomorrow.

Eagle_and_flag_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 2 years ago

 

When you take your gun safety course, might I suggest taking your son with you? He should know the finer points of gun safety as well. Unlike the video games, there is no "re-start" when you pull that trigger.


Your safety course will help you in the proper storage while you are at home and away from home.


Best wishes, and Be Careful!


In GOD We Trust (All others get searched, then checked through NCIC)

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White_shirt_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 2 years ago

 

Follow my advice on your introduction and all your questions will be answered. Slow down, relax and take a deep breath. Good luck.

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Rate This | Posted almost 2 years ago

 

Welcome to Police Link. MetroRW30 covered most of the question. I'll add learn to handle and operate the weapon and ALL safety rules before you ever load it or go shooting.

Somegiveall_max160_max160_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 2 years ago

 

hello and welcome to policelink, i have read your intro but chose to say hi on this forum, so far you have gotten some good advise. I am glad that you had already resigned yourself to attend a firearms training course and i am glad one of our members suggested you bring your 16 year old son with you. I would add, unless your husband is a law enforcement officer or combat arms military, hubby should also be invited, make it a family thing where everyone knows the weapon, how to handle it, shoot it, RESPECT IT.


I am wondering  why you, at your tender age (you do admit to having a 16 Yr old son) decided to get a shotgun for personal and household protection. This will enable alot of us to assist and advise you in gun ownership and its related aspects. Did you recently move into a high crime area? do you have a neighbor who is a psycho? Has there been an increase in violent crime or home breakins in your neighborhood which has made you uncomfortable? Has hubby been coming in late at nite with no excuse and smelling of perfume? JUST KIDDING ON LAST.


You are right in that getting a weapon for self defense and having it unavailable within seconds does not make sense, to go along with that type of thinking i would add a german shepherd which may buy you those valuable minutes to go to safe, unlock and withdraw weapon, go to ammo storage, unlock, load,  ya see where i am trying to take this?


there are a few discussions and forums on this site where you will find that officers, when at home, usually have a weapon close at hand, and one or two placed strategically around the home. I think it unfair and making no sense to advise you to do less. since you seem committed to this course of action,  arming yourself,  do it responsibly with forethought and commitment. best of luck to you and yours.

White_shirt_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 2 years ago

 

I am curious what role your husband plays in this. While married if my wife informed me she had purchased a shotgun (or any other weapon) I would have to axe what is happening? I am curious if you may be seperated or stalked and fear some problems. I am trying to connet the dots on a person out of the blue purchasing a weapon. Please enlighten us.

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Rate This | Posted almost 2 years ago

 

To answer all questions...


There has been a recent spate of home break-ins in my formerly very secure neighborhood. My husband is on board with the shotgun thing but I was the one to take the initiative. Before very recently, we were both committed to the "no guns ever" mindset. Our daughter was shot in the head exactly 10 days after turning 18 by a whackadoodle boyfriend. That was a number of years ago and she did recover (except for a left sided paralysis) after eight months of hospitalized rehab. That's why we were anti guns. But, we've matured a bit and altered our outlook because the world is changing and there are a ton of really bad guys out there doing really bad things. I am never going to be a victim again nor is anyone in my house if I have the power to prevent it. The weird thing is that I bought my shotgun the day before the Newtown shootings.


Yes, husband is going with me to training class and, thanks to advice I've received in this forum, so is 16 year old. BTW, 16 year old is not son but grandson who lives with us. I also have a multidisabled adult daughter who lives at home. Husband is great guy but not long on courage so I have to be the one who leads the way. Local police officer suggested the shotgun and a friend who knnows long guns took me to select and purchase one.


I am so grateful to all of you who are supporting and advising me in this. It's a bit scary having a weapon. I want to be a safe and responsible gun owner and the things you all are telling me are going to help.


 

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Rate This | Posted almost 2 years ago

 

1-20-13


I am acutely aware that there are more people reading and looking at this topic than you, Sherry. Stockton can be a tough place to live. Did you hear about the officer that was killed in Galt last Wednesday, about 20 minutes north of you?


I certainly would not discount any advice these officers have provided. They are a sharp group of people.


As a firearms instructor, I would steer you away from the shotgun. A 'street sweeper' does not make up for lack of training or gun handling. A multi-shot round (for law enforcement, we use 'double-ought' buck [00 buck]). The pellet spread would not really apply to an in-home defense application. An 870 is an established weapon for law enforcement. It does require much practice and skill to effectively operate one. Even is you went to a smaller size pellet, as a homeowner / citizen you will need to account for every single pellet when deployed. I know about the intimidation factor and the fact there are no naturally occurring metallic sounds in the jungle: The 'rack-rack' of an 870 has a universal sound. Everyone knows.


I would have you consider a small handgun. A hammerless revolver. I will tell you why if you are interested.


Reply to this topic if still interested.


The Guy !
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Rate This | Posted almost 2 years ago

 

Very good points TheSarge makes, Sherry.. bump!


"Government's first duty is to protect the people, not run their lives." - Ronald Reagan