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Does anyone know of any studies done on the positive effects of handcuffing a suspect?

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Posted over 1 year ago

 

 I'm a security captain at a major sporting venue. During major event we have city police in the building working with us.  The ratio is about 20 to 1.  We average about 30 - 50 evictions during an event with about 6 involving resisting people.  Due to recent changes in management our senior staff is no longer allowed to use or carry handcuffs as it makes us look "unfriendly".  This now means when we get someone combative we have to restrain them by main force, this often involves several security offices grappling/ kneeling on or just plain manhandling the person until a officer with cuffs can arrive.  Talk about looking unfriendly!  I am trying to put together a business report to prove that the handcuffs are safer for both the staff and the person being restrained.  Does anyone know of any studies done on the subject that could help me?  

Vpsomourningband_max50

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One positive effect is that once handcuffed you and your staff no longer have to struggle to maintain control of the resisting offender, therefore, lessening your and their chances of being injured.  Will they let you carry the double cuff disposable cuffs?  Maybe you should propose the usage of these, not as visible as carrying cuffs on your belt.  Sheesh, maybe they should also realize that cuffs are mean looking and maybe a deterrent?  Or you could suggess that everyone carrying cuffs can smile?  (now I'm just being funny...)


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What is management thinking? I concur with DonnaLynn. My suggestion would be to have a police instructor address this issue regarding safety to both security personnel and those they detain/arrest. Possibly an instructor from the academy. Good luck with the idiots you are dealing with.

Th_policeavatar_2__max50

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1-3-13 AD


If I were in your shoes, I would instruct my staff to NEVER attempt to restrain an offender. Call for a uniformed officer and monitor the situation. Why? Multiple reasons.  Security officer safety, offender safety, general bystander safety and last, LIABILITY. Givien that nonsense of a directive, someone is going to be hurt and someone is going to be sued.  Starting with the security company for issuing the directive if a good lawyer is involved.  I feel for you. What are you suppose to do with a violent drunk? Use your adult voice!


""Life is a storm.. You will bask in the sunlight one moment, be shattered on the rocks the next. What makes you a man is what you do when that storm comes"
Alexander Dumas-The Count of Monte Christo

Schultz3_max50

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Do you guys carry any type of weapon? I do not necessarily mean a firearm, but some sort of intermediate weapon would be a good addition if you are going to apprehend people. I can see the other side of the story of why you would not have hand restraints. You never want to go into a force situation, including applying hand restraints, on equal grounds. If a person is combative or resists, it is an equal battle that you are going to lose sometimes. Waiting for a person with an advantage (taser, spray, baton, gun) is smart. Your presence will be the  best detterent, especially if you are staffed 1 for every 20 people. I have never seen the ratio be that far on the good guys part.

1asteriskshield_ezr_max50

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Officer safety, officer safety, officer safety! Who the heck is running your organization? If someone is being stupid enough to be removed from the event they shoul be subject to being removed brusquely. Personally I prefer my ASP hinged cuffs......they are UNCOMFORTABLE and made to not want to be worn again. There is something to be said for pain being a great educator.


You can't cure stupid.

Just_passin__thru_max50

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uncledennis1 says ...



What is management thinking? I concur with DonnaLynn. My suggestion would be to have a police instructor address this issue regarding safety to both security personnel and those they detain/arrest. Possibly an instructor from the academy. Good luck with the idiots you are dealing with.


 


+++++++++++++++


Excellent suggestion.



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Just_passin__thru_max50

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Also, it bothers me a lot when I've seen suspects handcuffed in the front.


Bad things happen faster when handcuffed in the front.


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Rate This | Posted over 1 year ago

 

 Any agency approved use of force policy outlines that the justification for the use of handcuffs is for officer safety, controlling movement from a subject, and to prevent harm to others.  

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I would first ask who ordered the directive, the contracted security company or the Sports Authority?


If it is in fact the SA, remember their the ones that are going to take the big hit if one of these knuckleheads file a lawsuit. Maybe  your contracted security company should make a strong case for using cuffs to the SA.   Present them with video of altercations, and bring up a point that the use of cuffs would enhance officer, staff and patron safety.


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Schultz3_max50

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Handcuffs are good to keep a person under control, I agree with that. I still do not think it is a good idea to apply hand restraints while not having any tools available to control a combative subject. Most people I have struggled with to get in restraints did not resist until my first contact. If unarmed security goes to hand cuff somebody and they resist, what do they have to rely on? It is a fight. If they wait for somebody with at least an intermediate weapon, then they have the upper hand. I would push to have tasers for some of the security guards and they worry about the hand restraints.

Newpatch_sq90_max50

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SGT405 says ...



1-3-13 AD


If I were in your shoes, I would instruct my staff to NEVER attempt to restrain an offender. Call for a uniformed officer and monitor the situation. Why? Multiple reasons.  Security officer safety, offender safety, general bystander safety and last, LIABILITY. Givien that nonsense of a directive, someone is going to be hurt and someone is going to be sued.  Starting with the security company for issuing the directive if a good lawyer is involved.  I feel for you. What are you suppose to do with a violent drunk? Use your adult voice!



SGT405 Hit the nail on the head with his statement.  Well said.


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 Maybe we need to address a couple of points we have a venue of approximately 55000 people during a major event with an average of 150 security staff and 20 police officers as assistance.  The building is 1/2 mile round and four levels so these officers could be anywhere in the building. So your comment monitor and wait seems a bit unrealistic.  Also you are putting the facility at risk if there is a fight and someone gets hurt, because if, we followed your suggestion and did not step in but monitored and observed the facility now becomes liable for not stopping the fight.  Our security is for the most part well trained, however, we need to quickly and effectively restrain a combative person.  I have noted that once in cuffs the person almost always calms down.  It is almost always easy for a single officer to monitor and control that person.  We are not asking that every officer to use the cuffs, only the captains who attend any call in there area anyway.  I am trying to find studies done on the calming effect of putting cuffs on combative persons, and the safety to the person ans staff 


 

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I gave you the answer regarding a trained professional from the police academy addressing management. Contact the academy for data regarding the calming affect once the person is cuffed. Another option is request additional police officers for this assignment. With some effort you can solve this problem. If you follow my advice I feel certain this matter will be resolved.

Th_policeavatar_2__max50

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We are prohibited from publishing our SOPs, manuals and DT manuals. I do not know of any private studies myself.


The  worst venues I have seen first hand for sporting events were Oakland, LA, Philadelphia and New York. I can't begin to tell you the number of drunken brawls that were dealt with at each during a game. If your Administrators think that just because it has not happened yet that it won't they are mistaken. The day will come when unruly, intoxicated fans will become violent and you will not be capable of handling the situation.  My opinion.


""Life is a storm.. You will bask in the sunlight one moment, be shattered on the rocks the next. What makes you a man is what you do when that storm comes"
Alexander Dumas-The Count of Monte Christo

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 Thank you,  for your help I'm trying to prevent injuries.  The men who do our training are retired and active members of the local department and are very good.  They have trained captains before in use of cuffs, but due to the changes in management and policy we are no longer able to use them.  There was NEVER any inappropriate use of force incidents with our staff and as far as we can see it is strictly an image issue.  They are totally ignoring the safety/ liability issue.  This why I was looking for the studies, so I could appeal to them on a business level.  We have good people working with us, well trained and capable, unfortunately it looks as if some one will have to be injured for them to change their small minds.  Thanks again folks.

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Chillick says ...



 Maybe we need to address a couple of points we have a venue of approximately 55000 people during a major event with an average of 150 security staff and 20 police officers as assistance.  The building is 1/2 mile round and four levels so these officers could be anywhere in the building. So your comment monitor and wait seems a bit unrealistic.  Also you are putting the facility at risk if there is a fight and someone gets hurt, because if, we followed your suggestion and did not step in but monitored and observed the facility now becomes liable for not stopping the fight.  Our security is for the most part well trained, however, we need to quickly and effectively restrain a combative person.  I have noted that once in cuffs the person almost always calms down.  It is almost always easy for a single officer to monitor and control that person.  We are not asking that every officer to use the cuffs, only the captains who attend any call in there area anyway.  I am trying to find studies done on the calming effect of putting cuffs on combative persons, and the safety to the person ans staff 


 


+++++++++++++++


I don't know if you're going to find much out there on the 'calming effects' of putting handcuffs on people. It kinda common knowledge. It's like trying to find out research done on the wetness of water. It just is. A handcuffed subject might still be mouthy but generally all the major aggressiveness dissipates once they are handcuffed (properly.... checked for tightness and double locked) and cuffed with the hands behind the back.


 



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