Group Forums >> PATRIOTISM >> *** GENERAL NORMAN SCHWARZKOPF: REST IN PEACE ***

-5

*** GENERAL NORMAN SCHWARZKOPF: REST IN PEACE ***

607 Views
22 Replies Flag as inappropriate
Eagle_and_flag_max50

7785 posts

back to top

Posted over 1 year ago

 

Retired Four Star General Herbert Norman "Stormin' Norman" Schwarzkopf, Jr. died Thursday December 27, 2012 in Tampa, Florida. He was 78.

His death has been attributed to complications from Pneumonia



Awards and Decorations:


Defense Distinguished Service Medal

Army Distinguished Service Medal (with 3 Oak Leaf Clusters)

Navy Distinguished Service Meda

Air Force Distinguished Service Medal

Coast Guard Distinguished Service Medal

Silver Star (with 2 Oak Leaf Clusters)

Defense Superior Service Medal

Legion of Merit

Distinguished Flying Cross

Bronze Star (with Valor Device and 2 Oak Leaf Clusters)

Purple Heart (with Oak Leaf Cluster)

Meritorious Service Medal (with 6 Oak Leaf Clusters)

Air Medal (with award numeral 9)

Army Commendation Medal (with Valor Device and 3 Oak Leaf Clusters)


 


U.S. Unit Awards:

Meritorious Unit Commendation


 


U.S. Service (Campaign) Medals and Service & Training Ribbons:

Army of Occupation Medal

National Defense Service Ribbon (with Service Star)

Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal

Vietnam Service Medal (with 4 bronze campaign stars)

Army Service Ribbon

Army Overseas Ribbon (with numeral 3)


 


U.S. Badges, Patches and Tabs:

Combat Infantryman Badge

Master Parachutist Badge

Army Staff Identification Badge

Office of the Joint Chief of Staff Identification Badge

Office of the Secretary of Defense Badge

United States Central Command

6th Infantry Regiment Unit Insignia


 


U.S. Non-Military and foreign military awards:

United States Presidential Medal of Freedom

United States Congressional Gold Medal

United States Republican Senatorial Medal of Freedom

British Knight Commander in the Military Division of the Most Honourable Order of the Bath (honorary)

French legion d'honneur, order of the Grand Officier

Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross with Palm (with 2 bronze Palms and bronze Star)

Republic of Vietnam Armed Forces Honor Medal first class

Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross Unit Citation Ribbon

Republic of Vietnam Civil Actions Unit Citation Ribbon

Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal

Republic of Vietnam Master Parachutist Badge


 


Other Honors:

Schwarzkopf Elementary School, named after him in Lutz, Florida; 1991

Honorary First Class Private in the French Foreign Legion; 1991

Distinguished German-American of the Year; 2006

Inducted in the New Jersey Hall of Fame; 2008

Time Magazine Cover on February 4, 1991 and April 1, 1996


In GOD We Trust (All others get searched, then checked through NCIC)

MODERATOR #10

Photobucket

IN HONOR OF OUR FALLEN

Eagle_and_flag_max50

7785 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted over 1 year ago

 

Rest in Peace, General!!!



In GOD We Trust (All others get searched, then checked through NCIC)

MODERATOR #10

Photobucket

IN HONOR OF OUR FALLEN

White_shirt_max50

4927 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted over 1 year ago

 

R.I.P. Thanks for your service Sir.

Cruise_2014_max50

2557 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted over 1 year ago

 

 R.I.P. General. Our country is greater because of heroes like you. 


PL MENTORING TEAM MEMBER

"Don't underestimate the drawing power of the Garden State." From the film "Dogma"

Trying to stay sane in an insane world...

Lady_jessie_max50

5969 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted over 1 year ago

 

No finer General.


He would have been an outstanding Chief of Police.


I will miss him. One of my academy classes tracked him down at a conference, approached him about signing a book for me and they gave me the book when they graduated. A treasured treasure that I will always keep with me.


The Guy !
Photobucket

Honoring the Fallen

45089_396847393722850_1055776862_n_max50

4256 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted over 1 year ago

 

 I"m going to miss this very fine gentleman and officer.  R.I.P. General Schwarzkopf and God speed!


The glory of young men is their strength: and the beauty of old men is the grey head
- Proverbs 20:29

Nemo me impune lacessit

YaYa SuzieQ

Photobucket

Giu-turkey-distribution-004-801_max50

235 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted over 1 year ago

 

36TR says ...



Retired Four Star General Herbert Norman "Stormin' Norman" Schwarzkopf, Jr. died Thrusday December 27, 2012 in Tampa, Florida. He was 78.

His death has been attributed to complications from Pneumonia



Awards and Decorations:


Defense Distinguished Service Medal

Army Distinguished Service Medal (with 3 Oak Leaf Clusters)

Navy Distinguished Service Meda

Air Force Distinguished Service Medal

Coast Guard Distinguished Service Medal

Silver Star (with 2 Oak Leaf Clusters)

Defense Superior Service Medal

Legion of Merit

Distinguished Flying Cross

Bronze Star (with Valor Device and 2 Oak Leaf Clusters)

Purple Heart (with Oak Leaf Cluster)

Meritorious Service Medal (with 6 Oak Leaf Clusters)

Air Medal (with award numeral 9)

Army Commendation Medal (with Valor Device and 3 Oak Leaf Clusters)


 


U.S. Unit Awards:

Meritorious Unit Commendation


 


U.S. Service (Campaign) Medals and Service & Training Ribbons:

Army of Occupation Medal

National Defense Service Ribbon (with Service Star)

Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal

Vietnam Service Medal (with 4 bronze campaign stars)

Army Service Ribbon

Army Overseas Ribbon (with numeral 3)


 


U.S. Badges, Patches and Tabs:

Combat Infantryman Badge

Master Parachutist Badge

Army Staff Identification Badge

Office of the Joint Chief of Staff Identification Badge

Office of the Secretary of Defense Badge

United States Central Command

6th Infantry Regiment Unit Insignia


 


U.S. Non-Military and foreign military awards:

United States Presidential Medal of Freedom

United States Congressional Gold Medal

United States Republican Senatorial Medal of Freedom

British Knight Commander in the Military Division of the Most Honourable Order of the Bath (honorary)

French legion d'honneur, order of the Grand Officier

Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross with Palm (with 2 bronze Palms and bronze Star)

Republic of Vietnam Armed Forces Honor Medal first class

Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross Unit Citation Ribbon

Republic of Vietnam Civil Actions Unit Citation Ribbon

Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal

Republic of Vietnam Master Parachutist Badge


 


Other Honors:

Schwarzkopf Elementary School, named after him in Lutz, Florida; 1991

Honorary First Class Private in the French Foreign Legion; 1991

Distinguished German-American of the Year; 2006

Inducted in the New Jersey Hall of Fame; 2008

Time Magazine Cover on February 4, 1991 and April 1, 1996



Thanks Tim, what a way to honor a Hero!


 


“The real reason that we can’t have the Ten Commandments in a courthouse: You cannot post “Thou shalt not steal,” “Thou shalt not commit adultery,” and “Thou shalt not lie” in a building full of lawyers, judges, and politicians. It creates a hostile work environment.”

Thumbnail_max50

1304 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted over 1 year ago

 

 Rest in Peace General Schwarzkopf.  Thank you for your dedicated service to our Country.  We need more like you.

20140718_195833-1_max50

412 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted over 1 year ago

 

Rest in Peace General Schwarzkopf.  Thank you for you service to our country.

Eagle_and_flag_max50

7785 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted over 1 year ago

 

Could you imagine what kind of Army we would have with General Schwarzkopf and CSM Basil Plumley in charge???  WOW!!!


In GOD We Trust (All others get searched, then checked through NCIC)

MODERATOR #10

Photobucket

IN HONOR OF OUR FALLEN

Nag_max50

1889 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted over 1 year ago

 

RIP

Crumb_passin_thru_02_1__max50

2178 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted over 1 year ago

 

Thanks for the memories, "Stormin' Norman".


After reading all his decorations, I got curious about the conventions surrounding the addition of the Oak Leaf Clusters. I read that each additional award of a particular decoration is denoted by a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster--up to 5, then a Silver Oak Leaf Cluster is used with the medal to denote 6 total awards of that designation. Given that it says he has 6 Oak Leaf Clusters attached to his Meritorious Service Medal, does that mean he has 6 Silver Oak Leaf Clusters (denoting 31 times awarded this medal) or something else? It could be one Silver Oak Leaf Cluster plus one Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster denoting 7 or maybe he simply was awarded a 6th Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster for the MSM before this convention was adopted?


I know...dumb question, but I was curious. 




Bessie Braddock: “Sir, you are drunk.”
Churchill: “Madam, you are ugly. In the morning, I shall be sober.”

Eagle_and_flag_max50

7785 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted over 1 year ago

 


mz, this may help with your question:


 




Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster




Criteria: Bronze and Silver Oak Leaf Clusters are common devices placed on many United States military awards and decorations signifying multiple bestowals of a particular award. The number of oak leaf clusters indicates the second and subsequent awards of the decoration. One single oak leaf cluster, for example, is attached to the designated award and denotes a second award of that particular decoration. Service members do not wear more than one service ribbon on their ribbon rack even when they have received the award more than once. Instead, multiple awards are shown by attaching the oak leaves to the ribbon. One single oak leaf denotes the second award of that particular decoration. Two oak leaves denotes three awards. Four denote five awards. When the sixth award of a specific decoration is bestowed on the individual, a single “silver” bronze oak leaf is placed on the ribbon (as opposed to five bronze oak leaves). Oak leaves are most commonly employed by the U.S. Army and U.S. Air Force to denote multiple awards. The U.S. Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard typically employ Gold and Silver Stars to signify multiple awards. Specific use of these devices, however, vary between services.



In GOD We Trust (All others get searched, then checked through NCIC)

MODERATOR #10

Photobucket

IN HONOR OF OUR FALLEN

Eagle_and_flag_max50

7785 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted over 1 year ago

 

My Flag at Half Staff in Honor of General Schwarzkopf:



In GOD We Trust (All others get searched, then checked through NCIC)

MODERATOR #10

Photobucket

IN HONOR OF OUR FALLEN

Crumb_passin_thru_02_1__max50

2178 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted over 1 year ago

 

Tim--yeah, that's what I (already) read that made me ask the question about the "6 Oak Leaf Clusters" attached to his MSM.


"When the sixth award of a specific decoration is bestowed on the individual, a single “silver” bronze oak leaf is placed on the ribbon (as opposed to five bronze oak leaves)."


 




Bessie Braddock: “Sir, you are drunk.”
Churchill: “Madam, you are ugly. In the morning, I shall be sober.”

Eagle_and_flag_max50

7785 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted over 1 year ago

 

Official Obituary


 


****General H. Norman Schwarzkopf****


August 22, 1934 - December 27, 2012

Tampa, Florida | Age 78


WASHINGTON (AP) — Truth is, retired Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf didn't care much for his popular "Stormin' Norman" nickname.


The seemingly no-nonsense Desert Storm commander's reputed temper with aides and subordinates supposedly earned him that rough-and-ready moniker. But others around the general, who died Thursday in Tampa, Fla., at age 78 of complications from pneumonia, knew him as a friendly, talkative and even jovial figure who preferred the somewhat milder sobriquet given by his troops: "The Bear."


That one perhaps suited him better later in his life, when he supported various national causes and children's charities while eschewing the spotlight and resisting efforts to draft him to run for political office.


He lived out a quiet retirement in Tampa, where he'd served his last military assignment and where an elementary school bearing his name is testament to his standing in the community.


Schwarzkopf capped an illustrious military career by commanding the U.S.-led international coalition that drove Saddam Hussein's forces out of Kuwait in 1991 — but he'd managed to keep a low profile in the public debate over the second Gulf War against Iraq, saying at one point that he doubted victory would be as easy as the White House and the Pentagon predicted.


Schwarzkopf was named commander in chief of U.S. Central Command at Tampa's MacDill Air Force Base in 1988, overseeing the headquarters for U.S. military and security concerns in nearly two dozen countries stretching across the Middle East to Afghanistan and the rest of central Asia, plus Pakistan.


When Saddam invaded Kuwait two years later to punish it for allegedly stealing Iraqi oil reserves, Schwarzkopf commanded Operation Desert Storm, the coalition of some 30 countries organized by President George H.W. Bush that succeeded in driving the Iraqis out.


At the peak of his postwar national celebrity, Schwarzkopf — a self-proclaimed political independent — rejected suggestions that he run for office, and remained far more private than other generals, although he did serve briefly as a military commentator for NBC.


While focused primarily on charitable enterprises in his later years, he campaigned for President George W. Bush in 2000, but was ambivalent about the 2003 invasion of Iraq. In early 2003 he told The Washington Post that the outcome was an unknown: "What is postwar Iraq going to look like, with the Kurds and the Sunnis and the Shiites? That's a huge question, to my mind. It really should be part of the overall campaign plan."


Initially Schwarzkopf had endorsed the invasion, saying he was convinced that Secretary of State Colin Powell had given the United Nations powerful evidence of Iraqi weapons of mass destruction. After that proved false, he said decisions to go to war should depend on what U.N. weapons inspectors found.


He seldom spoke up during the conflict, but in late 2004 he sharply criticized Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld and the Pentagon for mistakes that included erroneous judgments about Iraq and inadequate training for Army reservists sent there.


"In the final analysis I think we are behind schedule. ... I don't think we counted on it turning into jihad (holy war)," he said in an NBC interview.


Schwarzkopf was born Aug. 24, 1934, in Trenton, N.J., where his father, Col. H. Norman Schwarzkopf, founder and commander of the New Jersey State Police, was then leading the investigation of the Lindbergh kidnap case. That investigation ended with the arrest and 1936 execution of German-born carpenter Richard Hauptmann for murdering famed aviator Charles Lindbergh's infant son.


The elder Schwarzkopf was named Herbert, but when the son was asked what his "H'' stood for, he would reply, "H."


As a teenager Norman accompanied his father to Iran, where the elder Schwarzkopf trained the Iran's national police force and was an adviser to Reza Pahlavi, the young Shah of Iran.


Young Norman studied there and in Switzerland, Germany and Italy, then followed in his father's footsteps to West Point, graduating in 1956 with an engineering degree. After stints in the U.S. and abroad, he earned a master's degree in engineering at the University of Southern California and later taught missile engineering at West Point.


In 1966 he volunteered for Vietnam and served two tours, first as a U.S. adviser to South Vietnamese paratroops and later as a battalion commander in the U.S. Army's Americal Division. He earned three Silver Stars for valor — including one for saving troops from a minefield — plus a Bronze Star, a Purple Heart and three Distinguished Service Medals.


While many career officers left military service embittered by Vietnam, Schwarzkopf was among those who opted to stay and help rebuild the tattered Army into a potent, modernized all-volunteer force.


After Saddam invaded Kuwait in August 1990, Schwarzkopf played a key diplomatic role by helping persuade Saudi Arabia's King Fahd to allow U.S. and other foreign troops to deploy on Saudi territory as a staging area for the war to come.


On Jan. 17, 1991, a five-month buildup called Desert Shield became Operation Desert Storm as allied aircraft attacked Iraqi bases and Baghdad government facilities. The six-week aerial campaign climaxed with a massive ground offensive on Feb. 24-28, routing the Iraqis from Kuwait in 100 hours before U.S. officials called a halt.


Schwarzkopf said afterward he agreed with Bush's decision to stop the war rather than drive to Baghdad to capture Saddam, as his mission had been only to oust the Iraqis from Kuwait.


But in a desert tent meeting with vanquished Iraqi generals, he allowed a key concession on Iraq's use of helicopters, which later backfired by enabling Saddam to crack down more easily on rebellious Shiites and Kurds.


While he later avoided the public second-guessing by academics and think tank experts over the ambiguous outcome of the first Gulf War and its impact on the second Gulf War, he told The Washington Post in 2003, "You can't help but ... with 20/20 hindsight, go back and say, 'Look, had we done something different, we probably wouldn't be facing what we are facing today.'"


After retiring from the Army in 1992, Schwarzkopf wrote a best-selling autobiography, "It Doesn't Take A Hero." Of his Gulf War role, he said: "I like to say I'm not a hero. I was lucky enough to lead a very successful war." He was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II and honored with decorations from France, Britain, Belgium, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Qatar and Bahrain.


Schwarzkopf was a national spokesman for prostate cancer awareness and for Recovery of the Grizzley Bear, served on the Nature Conservancy Board of Governors and was active in various charities for chronically ill children.


"I may have made my reputation as a general in the Army and I'm very proud of that," he once told The Associated Press. "But I've always felt that I was more than one-dimensional. I'd like to think I'm a caring human being. ... It's nice to feel that you have a purpose."


Schwarzkopf and his wife, Brenda, had three children: Cynthia, Jessica and Christian.


In GOD We Trust (All others get searched, then checked through NCIC)

MODERATOR #10

Photobucket

IN HONOR OF OUR FALLEN

-24 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted over 1 year ago

 

I rank him up there with Robert E.Lee, U.S.Grant,Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain,Teddy Roosevelt,Thomas(Stonewall) Jackson,George Washington,Douglas McArthur,Dwight David Eisenhower,Billy Mitchell,BlackJack Pershing,George Patton and Curtis LeMay.

Eagle_and_flag_max50

7785 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted over 1 year ago

 

TheSarge says ...



No finer General.


He would have been an outstanding Chief of Police.


I will miss him. One of my academy classes tracked him down at a conference, approached him about signing a book for me and they gave me the book when they graduated. A treasured treasure that I will always keep with me.



Just out of curiosity, which book?


In GOD We Trust (All others get searched, then checked through NCIC)

MODERATOR #10

Photobucket

IN HONOR OF OUR FALLEN

Eagle_and_flag_max50

7785 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted over 1 year ago

 

mz66 says ...



Tim--yeah, that's what I (already) read that made me ask the question about the "6 Oak Leaf Clusters" attached to his MSM.


"When the sixth award of a specific decoration is bestowed on the individual, a single “silver” bronze oak leaf is placed on the ribbon (as opposed to five bronze oak leaves)."


 



I see what you're saying now, mz. I'd have to do some further research. However, my guess would be a total of 7 awards for the MSM, since it says "6 Oak Leaf Clusters" and does not mention silver or bronze.


I will let you know.


In GOD We Trust (All others get searched, then checked through NCIC)

MODERATOR #10

Photobucket

IN HONOR OF OUR FALLEN

Eagle_and_flag_max50

7785 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted over 1 year ago

 


In GOD We Trust (All others get searched, then checked through NCIC)

MODERATOR #10

Photobucket

IN HONOR OF OUR FALLEN

Redhatpicmay25-2_max50

617 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted over 1 year ago

 

Truly a one of a kind patroit, He is gone but never forgotten.

Imgp0565__3__max50

270 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted over 1 year ago

 

ssu459 says ...



I rank him up there with Robert E.Lee, U.S.Grant,Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain,Teddy Roosevelt,Thomas(Stonewall) Jackson,George Washington,Douglas McArthur,Dwight David Eisenhower,Billy Mitchell,BlackJack Pershing,George Patton and Curtis LeMay.



Rest in Peace, we sure need more like you.