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Assigned Squads vs Rotating Patrol shifts

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Posted over 1 year ago

 

My agency is currently using a rotating shift every month which we bid out at the beginning of the year. We work 4-10-hour shifts.  So your supervisor will change from month to month as does your schedule depending how you bid for the year.


So the question is this: Our command is interested in going to an assigned squad where you would have the same supervisor the entire year and work with the same officers the entire year.


Do any of your agencies use this type of scheduling? What do you see as the pros and cons in utilizing this method of scheduling?


 

White_shirt_max50

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Helicopter_max50

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In my agency, we have 5 divisions (Downtown, North, Southeast, Southwest, West.) Each division has 8 patrol squads, consisting of 12-15 Constables and 1 Sergeant. We all work 11 hour days, 4 on 4 off, rotating between 4 different start times.


I like it because we consistently work with the same crew, and the same supervisor That way, you always know the strengths and weaknesses of the guys around you, and always know what the boss expects.


In addition to the patrol squads, we have specialized units (tactical, beats, gang and drug, vice, sex assault etc). For the most part, they use a similar system to patrol with regards to squadmates and supervisors, but the schedule will be different.

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All I know is this.....that would suck if my department operated like that. Our department is small, a total of 23 sworn officers. There are two patrol squads, one sergeant for each that works a split 3p to 3a. Our shifts are 12 hour rotations, and work out so that one week we work every day except wed/thur and the following we are off everyday except wed/thurs. We go from days to nights every 28 days, working 7 to 7. Each squad is four officers (2 for day and 2 for night), with an additional one senior officer as a split that works side by side with the Sgt. So.....I couldnt imagine having a different sergeant all of the time, or rotating out. I love my sergeant, and most of us are set and comfortable on the squads we are assigned to. It stinks in a sense, because in all reality we need about 6-8 on duty at a time, but the city would never go for that so we are stuck operating in pairs of 2....always looking out for each other. This area is high in crime, particularly violent in nature. So, the idea of being by yourself with no back up must be acceptable and you always need to watch your six. Stay safe.


 


 

Ggb_max50

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Rated +1 | Posted over 1 year ago

 

First things first: Your English and grammar was atrocious. I spent time correcting your post. Nothing like a cop who doesn't look good on paper.


Second, I would promote the idea of a same supe and the same crew throughout the year. I have work many kinds of configurations with regards to supervision and crews, both as a patrolman and as a sergeant.


Here are the benefits:


1. Supervision is consistent. This means evaluations should also be consistent. If you have a nut for a supervisor, this is a tough one but it can resolve out nicely.


2. You get to intimately know well your teammates and beat partners. You know their strengths and their areas of weakness. With any patrol shift, you have to know who the players are on YOUR side. It makes for more efficient work.


3. Getting time off is a litle easier because you already know who's who in the zoo.


4. Constantly changing crews and supes does not promote sound officer safety practice on a grander scale. Everyone can have a tendency to 'do their own thing'.


Why do you think Special Operations Teams stay with each other for years with little shifting around? The longer you stay together, the safer you will feel and the safer you will do your work.


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TheSarge says ...



First things first: Your English and grammar was atrocious. I spent time correcting your post. Nothing like a cop who doesn't look good on paper.


Second, I would promote the idea of a same supe and the same crew throughout the year. I have work many kinds of configurations with regards to supervision and crews, both as a patrolman and as a sergeant.


Here are the benefits:


1. Supervision is consistent. This means evaluations should also be consistent. If you have a nut for a supervisor, this is a tough one but it can resolve out nicely.


2. You get to intimately know well your teammates and beat partners. You know their strengths and their areas of weakness. With any patrol shift, you have to know who the players are on YOUR side. It makes for more efficient work.


3. Getting time off is a litle easier because you already know who's who in the zoo.


4. Constantly changing crews and supes does not promote sound officer safety practice on a grander scale. Everyone can have a tendency to 'do their own thing'.


Why do you think Special Operations Teams stay with each other for years with little shifting around? The longer you stay together, the safer you will feel and the safer you will do your work.



 


I agree with Sarge! Our squads are pretty much fixed, unless some one quits or gets fired. We work so close, and are such a tight knit that we pretty much know each other in and out. I can hear my partner call out a traffic stop, and just by the tone in his voice I know when I should start heading his way. A hot call may come out, and I pretty much know with 99% accuracy what he will do, and how he will handle himself. All I need to know is which direction he is coming from, and I know what to do. Working with my Sgt. is the same thing. You learn each others strengths and weaknesses in this way, and in a sense you compliment each other.

1asteriskshield_ezr_max50

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2 on, 2 off, 3 on, 2 off, 2 on, 3 off. All 12's, all with the same supervisors. This is a very good schedule for us, we only work 6 months out of the year.....BEFORE vacations. Gives us time for extra duty and training in other areas. Sux sometimes for family time though.


You can't cure stupid.

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I work for a VERY small PD, often being the only officer in duty.  We work five days a week, eight hours a day.  Of course the Chief is on M-F with Sat. & Sun off, but he has no problem coming out to work if someone calls off or we are short handed.  With four full timers, we ony have 2 choices.....regular shifts or to rotate.  Presently we are rotating every 28 days, which means different days off each shift.  The officers don't like that, however they like the fact that they can plan ahead, knowing what days off they'll have off every month. 


Years ago, we worked steady shifts with full timers off Sat and Sun.  It mostly worked out good because the 3-11 guy liked that turn as did the 11-7 man.  We used part timers more then as we only had 3 full time officers.  Back then, a shift change for discipline or because somebody pulled a political string meant someone else got screwed.  I remember one time when the mayor got upset about lax work on weekends so the full timers had their weekends off taken away.  All that did was upset the full timers, causing one to loose extra money as he played in a band on Sat. evenings.  The other thing it did was cause ALL kinds of problems with getting mid-week off days filled with part time officers, most of whom were available on weekends.  Well, guess what?  It changed back to weekends off quickly.  I think scheduling officers in a small PD can be more difficult that in a larger one.  Also, when an officer is off for an extended time due to illness, then the schedule gets very problematic. 

Ggb_max50

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