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Police Ride-along

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Posted about 2 years ago

 

Hello Everyone


Today, I went to my local police station and I asked if they have a ride-along program. They said "yes, they do have a ride-along program and that in order to sign up for it, you have to email the chief of police with a reason for wanting to be involved in the program.


The officer also mentioned that I should state the groups I am involved in because you cannot go for a ride-along just because you think it would be fun or cool.


Well, the reason I want to go for a ride-along is to see if being a officer is something I really want to do. I mean I am positive that it is but I want to see what really goes on in a days work. I am also not involved in any groups or programs and I am just finishing my last highschool credits.


So I am wondering if anyone can give me tips or advice on how to go about writing my police ride-along request.


 


Also should I include any of this...I don't think that I will include the last one but want your opinions.


 


- I have been a victim of assault and I sent the person to prison for a year and the station really admired the situation and pooled-together some of their own money to put towards an iPod Touch for me.


- I also am responsible for my step-brother being in prison because he was involved in something that I felt the need to report because he was endangering his life and others.


 


The reason I would consider adding the first information is because I am thankful and also because it inspired me to want to help others.


The other reason I highly doubt I would add but I think both show that I have helped and had some connection with the department.


 


Anyways thanks


 

Tactical_rappelling_max50

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Rated +1 | Posted about 2 years ago

 

I don't think adding the situation with your stepbrother is really important to add.  Just add who you are (high school student) and that you're considering law enforcement as a career.  If you want to add how you respect LEO's from your experience, go right ahead.  I think the Chief is probably trying to weed out trouble makers and those that might interfere with the department's mission and the patrolman's job.  Just my two cents.

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Rate This | Posted about 2 years ago

 

Thanks for the reply, to be honest I only added that bit of information for everyone here to see if it can help relate to anything I should add.

Bald-eagle-in-flight_860_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 2 years ago

 

Just breathe, relax, and be honest with the Chief.  Let him know where you're coming from (considering an LE career), are interested to see what actually goes on in the squad and on the streets, and to get a better idea of whether you and LE would be a good fit.


If you're approved for a ride-along, remember:  you're there to learn and absorb information.  Ask good questions and listen to the answers.  Realize that not all officers are enthused about riders, and that one day can be drastically different than the next.  Wear business-casual clothes or whatever the Chief, Lieutenant or Sergeant deems appropriate.  If allowed and you are financially able, ask your host officer if you can by him/her a cup of coffee as a thank-you for the opportunity.


Kudos to you for taking the first step and asking.  Hopefully your request is approved and you get to see what it's like.  Good luck!

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Rate This | Posted about 2 years ago

 

I know I am probably overthinking this email to much but just want to know does this opening addressing who I am emailing seem appropriate.


 


Greetings Sgt. John Smith


 


I just think I should refrain from using "Dear" because it sounds like an opening I would write to my girlfriend lol.

White_shirt_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 2 years ago

 

Tell them career interest. Dear is fine.

Me2_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 2 years ago

 

You're overthinking it... lol


Just be honest with the Chief. Say that you're interested in law enforcement as a career. As my colleagues have already stated - it's usually a way to weed out those that would interfere with the officer's job. And there's several departments that I've seen require you to do a ride along early in the selection process so you can see what life is like "on the beat".


~Stay Safe~

2012-09-24_22-41-56_408_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 2 years ago

 

I think it is important so that you can have a brief understanding of the actual day to day operations. Actual Law Enforcement is pretty far removed from the stuff you see on TV. Murders are generally not solved in 46 minutes plus comercials. COPS, Police Women of .....County, and Alaska State Troopers generally require hundreds of hours of footage to fill a 30 or 60 minute program.


It's hours of boredom, "routine" work interrupted occasionally by short bursts of "Oh Crap".


From giving parents the worst news they will ever get in their lives, to saving someone's life.


 From explaining to your signifigant other why you have to cancel plans again and go back into work, to the times when on day 2 of your 3 day off schedule, you can;t wait to go back to work.


Then you have Department politics, toxic leaders, "ME First" driven superiors, and the general public who want you when they need you, and will never appreciate what you do for a living.


As we say in Resiliency training, you have to "Hunt the good". For most of us this takes work, but it makes quite a difference in the long term.


Good luck with your ride along. I hope you are paired with an Officer who want to have a ride along for the shift, and not someone who was forced to take you. Ask questions, but know when to be quiet. Do not interfere with anything, but assist when asked to. Listen with both ears, and take notes for questions you would like to ask after the situation has been resolved.


In a world where there are Sheep and Wolves,
I am the Sheepdog.
Ranger Up!

I am NOT a hero
but I know a few

White_shirt_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 2 years ago

 

I am going to offer some additional advice. Keep the smell good to a minimum. I have experienced riders who over did the smell good and low flying aircraft could smell them. Second piece of advice. Once you complete the ride-along send a handwritten thank you note to the supervisor giving the officer an at-a-boy. Hand written not email.

Me2_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 2 years ago

 

Scjohnk says ...



I think it is important so that you can have a brief understanding of the actual day to day operations. Actual Law Enforcement is pretty far removed from the stuff you see on TV. Murders are generally not solved in 46 minutes plus comercials. COPS, Police Women of .....County, and Alaska State Troopers generally require hundreds of hours of footage to fill a 30 or 60 minute program.


It's hours of boredom, "routine" work interrupted occasionally by short bursts of "Oh Crap".


From giving parents the worst news they will ever get in their lives, to saving someone's life.


 From explaining to your signifigant other why you have to cancel plans again and go back into work, to the times when on day 2 of your 3 day off schedule, you can;t wait to go back to work.


Then you have Department politics, toxic leaders, "ME First" driven superiors, and the general public who want you when they need you, and will never appreciate what you do for a living.


As we say in Resiliency training, you have to "Hunt the good". For most of us this takes work, but it makes quite a difference in the long term.


Good luck with your ride along. I hope you are paired with an Officer who want to have a ride along for the shift, and not someone who was forced to take you. Ask questions, but know when to be quiet. Do not interfere with anything, but assist when asked to. Listen with both ears, and take notes for questions you would like to ask after the situation has been resolved.



Very good points! People seem to think that law enforcement is all "shoot 'em up" when alot of the job is spent bored out of our minds... Be prepared for alot of "hurry up and wait". And, I also hope you get an officer who wants a ride-along; I know alot of my partners don't want the liability and they get pretty gruff when they're forced to take someone out. Be respectful and let him/her do their job... watch and learn, but don't forget to ask questions after the situation is completely dealt with - to me, it's a very good learning experience.


~Stay Safe~