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Overtime

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Posted over 2 years ago

 

 Hi, I am considering a career in law enforcement, so I would like some insider information on a typical work week. 


First of all, I know counties have different scheduling systems such as 4/10.


1. After you have worked your 4 day shift are you required to go back on the job if you get called in for overtime?


2. Because of getting called in, is it hard to have a private life?


3. What is the worst part of the day?


Thank you for your input, I really do appreciate it. God bless.

White_shirt_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 2 years ago

 

Why not contact your local agency and axe these questions? Click on become a cop on this site which may be of assistance. With these concerns I am not certain I would recommend a career in law enforcement. Take a deep breath and relax. Schedule a ride-a-long with your local agency and axe these questions.

1asteriskshield_ezr_max50

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Rated +1 | Posted over 2 years ago

 

GenomeUnmasked says ...



 Hi, I am considering a career in law enforcement, so I would like some insider information on a typical work week. 


First of all, I know counties have different scheduling systems such as 4/10.


1. After you have worked your 4 day shift are you required to go back on the job if you get called in for overtime?


2. Because of getting called in, is it hard to have a private life?


3. What is the worst part of the day?


Thank you for your input, I really do appreciate it. God bless.



1. Why would they call us back in with others on the payroll? In the case of a natural disaster or riots, yes. Otherwise, no.


2.Yes, it's hard having a private life in this profession period.


3. Waking up


You can't cure stupid.

Schultz3_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 2 years ago

 

Any overtime we work has to be approved by a supervisor and has to be okay with the officer. Police officers have the same workplace rights as any other profession. You cannot force a person to work overtime. With that said, I have not seen an officer refuse to come in for overtime. Usually if they are asked, circumstances are pretty desparate. There are programs like traffic patrol and helping patrol the boarders that are voluntary overtime that the officer signs up for. Of course, it is the choice of the officer, it is never mandatory.


With three days off per week, I have plenty of time for my family. The days I work, I may not see them much, though. I work from 1700-0300 most shifts, so I sleep when my family is awake and am working when they are awake. It is very important to set aside time during days off to spend with family. To often officers, especially new ones, cannot drag themselves away from the office when they are off shift. They are drawn to police work so much that they want nothing more than to be around it 24/7. I have trained five guys, and all of them were like that. I had to order them to go home and spend time with their families. More seasoned officers learn to make the transition to police work and their private life. It is hard to master, but if you do, you can have the best of both worlds.

Images_max50

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Rated +2 | Posted over 2 years ago

 

The fellas that posted above me have stated things well.


I will say the same things but in different words.


1. Overtime is generally optional. Rarely is someone required to stay. And OT usually just attached on to your regular work day. If you work 10 hours, you might be offered to work 4 more hours to cover staffing levels. Coming in from home just to work OT is a regular thing but generally picked up by more senior officers/deputies.


2. It's not hard to have an assemblance of a family life as long as YOU manage it correctly. Working nights, deep nights and other odd hours are hard on spouses and kids who like to have the family home to sleep at night. The allure of OT pay (usually at time and a half, rarely at double time) DOES add a little cash to your paycheck but keep this in mind: No one makes bank in law enforcement.


3. Worse part of the day is having to go to the bathroom and being stuck on traffic control at a fatal accident.


The Guy !
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Batman_max600_1__max50

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Rate This | Posted over 2 years ago

 

BUMP The Sarge, especially the last one. LOL


Bad stuff happens to good people, handle it and overcome.
My motto for life:
Let go and let GOD,
Only HE can control everything.

0923131848_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 2 years ago

 

 I'd just like to add that really small departments, like my town's, do have a greater need for overtime and officer flexibility, especially if there is a sickness going around. We have a Chief, a Lieutenant, four Sergeants, two Patrolmen under each Sergeant, one Detective and one traffice guy, who I'm sure has an official title, but I just don't know it. XD Anyway, two patrolmen and the Lt. were out sick with the flu the other day and a good number of guys were tied up in other things. On vacation, doing a detail at the high school, etc... So one of the guys who'd worked the shift just before this one - a full twelve hour shift, had to continue working for another twelve hours. Worst yet, he had to work the next morning! Of course, he was relieved as early as possible that next day, but this shows just what the job may require of you.