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What to expect first months on the job

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Posted almost 3 years ago

 

 Hi all,


Not sure if this was posted previously. I looked and did not see so here it goes-LEO's:



  • What are some of the struggles a rookie experiences right out of the academy?

  • Does the academy prepare you that much? The reason why I ask is because from the many books I have read, it says forget about what you have learned in the academy.

  • It is really that hard to get passed field training? The reason why I ask this question is because I would hate to put in all that effort to just fail. Moreover, ( I understand departments differ) do FTO's expect you to do your thing right out of the academy? For example, on the first day " hey rookie pull this car over and show me how it's done." Or is there a period where you watch and learn then apply what you learned. It just seems like there is so much to learn!

Thanks,


 


 


 

White_shirt_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 3 years ago

 

You joined two days ago and have a skeleton profile. Are you getting ready to enter the academy or are you an applicant? I am not comfortable with your line of questions. My suggestion is do a ride a long and axe the officer you ride with.

Att2307142_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 3 years ago

 

uncle dennis.

Schultz3_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 3 years ago

 

 There are phases of FTO in pretty much all agencies. For us, there is a cover phase, contact phase, and shadow phase. The frist phase is pretty much a watch and learn, 2nd is you doing the contacts, 3rd is you doing contacts and FTO in plain clothes observing. A good FTO will not set you up to fail.


What you learn in the academy will help you a lot. But your department will do some tweaking. Don't forget what you learned in the academy. Just learn how it applies to your departments policies and procedures. 

Cert_max600_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 3 years ago

 

CarlWinslow says ...



 Hi all,


Not sure if this was posted previously. I looked and did not see so here it goes-LEO's:



  • What are some of the struggles a rookie experiences right out of the academy?

  • Does the academy prepare you that much? The reason why I ask is because from the many books I have read, it says forget about what you have learned in the academy.

  • It is really that hard to get passed field training? The reason why I ask this question is because I would hate to put in all that effort to just fail. Moreover, ( I understand departments differ) do FTO's expect you to do your thing right out of the academy? For example, on the first day " hey rookie pull this car over and show me how it's done." Or is there a period where you watch and learn then apply what you learned. It just seems like there is so much to learn!


Thanks,


You have posted some very good questions although I do concur with uncledennis. Please give us some more information about yourself.


1) Each Rookie is different. Everyone has different strengths and weaknesses. A better question to ask here would be to ask yourelf what you think that you might struggle with. What are your strengths; what are your weaknesses. Be honest with yourself on the weakensses, because we all have them. And to acknowledge them will make you a stronger person.


2) Yes; The academy prepares you for the basics of the job. If you take what you learn in the academy and throw it all out, are you going to take what you learn on the street and disregard all of that too? Reading books and actually attending the academy are two entirely different things. However, doing one can help to prepare you for the other.


3) As for the FTO process; getting through that phase of the training is entirely up to the recruit. If you watch and learn and ask appropriate questions, you'll more than likely do fine. If you're not scared of failing, you will never appreciate success. Fear is natural, but if your not willing to at least try for fear of failure, then I would highly suggest a different career where your chance of success is 100%...good luck with that! We have all failed at one time or another...those failures make us who we are as a person. 


 


 



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Wredcedar_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 3 years ago

 

The acadeny covers theory and FTO covers practice.  Academy is the foundation you build on in FTO, don't forget what you learned in the academy.

Rafngreenblack_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 3 years ago

 

coshane220 says ...



CarlWinslow says ...



 Hi all,


Not sure if this was posted previously. I looked and did not see so here it goes-LEO's:



  • What are some of the struggles a rookie experiences right out of the academy?

  • Does the academy prepare you that much? The reason why I ask is because from the many books I have read, it says forget about what you have learned in the academy.

  • It is really that hard to get passed field training? The reason why I ask this question is because I would hate to put in all that effort to just fail. Moreover, ( I understand departments differ) do FTO's expect you to do your thing right out of the academy? For example, on the first day " hey rookie pull this car over and show me how it's done." Or is there a period where you watch and learn then apply what you learned. It just seems like there is so much to learn!


Thanks,


You have posted some very good questions although I do concur with uncledennis. Please give us some more information about yourself.


1) Each Rookie is different. Everyone has different strengths and weaknesses. A better question to ask here would be to ask yourelf what you think that you might struggle with. What are your strengths; what are your weaknesses. Be honest with yourself on the weakensses, because we all have them. And to acknowledge them will make you a stronger person.


2) Yes; The academy prepares you for the basics of the job. If you take what you learn in the academy and throw it all out, are you going to take what you learn on the street and disregard all of that too? Reading books and actually attending the academy are two entirely different things. However, doing one can help to prepare you for the other.


3) As for the FTO process; getting through that phase of the training is entirely up to the recruit. If you watch and learn and ask appropriate questions, you'll more than likely do fine. If you're not scared of failing, you will never appreciate success. Fear is natural, but if your not willing to at least try for fear of failure, then I would highly suggest a different career where your chance of success is 100%...good luck with that! We have all failed at one time or another...those failures make us who we are as a person. 


 


 



Att2307142_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 3 years ago

 

schultzy04 says ...



 There are phases of FTO in pretty much all agencies. For us, there is a cover phase, contact phase, and shadow phase. The frist phase is pretty much a watch and learn, 2nd is you doing the contacts, 3rd is you doing contacts and FTO in plain clothes observing. A good FTO will not set you up to fail.


What you learn in the academy will help you a lot. But your department will do some tweaking. Don't forget what you learned in the academy. Just learn how it applies to your departments policies and procedures. 



BUMP.  you gave  such great advice.

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Rate This | Posted almost 3 years ago

 

thank you all. I have done a ride along before, and asked plenty of questions. Around where I'm living in WA, it's difficult to get a ride along if you are not passed the oral board phase. So far I'm at the testing phase sheduled to take my physical and written next month. This is the last time I am testing for law enforcement. If that doesn't work I guess its off to the military again..haha. I have tested two times before this, paid the fees to take the test, but unfortunately there was a hiring freeze. In the meantime I guess I'll work on my profile.

74596_129289523905506_927477597_n_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 3 years ago

 

I was told to check all the buttons, nooks, and crannies before turning the car on....if you don't, your ears are going to pay for it!


Adapt, improvise and overcome.
YaYa Dancing Wolf

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Rated +1 | Posted almost 3 years ago

 

 On a rookies salary, it gets pretty expensive buying your FTO's lunch everyday. 


http://www.fowlergaragedoorservice.com

Oval-rockymount_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 3 years ago

 

CarlWinslow says ...



 Hi all,


Not sure if this was posted previously. I looked and did not see so here it goes-LEO's:



  • What are some of the struggles a rookie experiences right out of the academy?

  • Does the academy prepare you that much? The reason why I ask is because from the many books I have read, it says forget about what you have learned in the academy.

  • It is really that hard to get passed field training? The reason why I ask this question is because I would hate to put in all that effort to just fail. Moreover, ( I understand departments differ) do FTO's expect you to do your thing right out of the academy? For example, on the first day " hey rookie pull this car over and show me how it's done." Or is there a period where you watch and learn then apply what you learned. It just seems like there is so much to learn!


Thanks,


 I have been working as a LEO for almost three years, and even then the memories of the academy are still fresh to me.  In the academy you build a foundation of knowledge on how to handle certain situations as well as laws that apply to situations.  But also you learn what I call black and white areas or scenarios, meaning they have clear cut answers. Do not forget what you will learn in the academy but also know that not every situation you approach will be clear cut if you are straight up into the scenario.  Sometimes you have to step back and break down the situation before you can get an idea of what you are going to do.  In my department, we tell each other to "Slow the F**k Down."  The reason why we say this is that when you have the emergency portion of the scenario handled slow down and think.  You make more clear concise decisions when you do not rush.  The struggles that you will have when you get out of the academy, is remembering everything that you crammed into a short period of time, to apply to the streets.  But don't worry, your FTO is there to guide you.  Another important thing to remember when you get out of the academy, is if you do npt know, ask, otherwise the FTO will assume that you know.  FTO training is meant to ease you into the duty's of a police officer through stages that were previously mentioned.  You will do fine and good luck.


 


 


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Rate This | Posted almost 3 years ago

 

What to expect when you first come on the job is quite interesting.This is NOT par for the course,but my first call was a "Help an Officer".A fellow recruit ,who had come on with me was shot.The second call was a fatality,in which a 10 month old child was killed.My last call of the evenhing was a cruiser collision in which another fellow recruit was injured during a chase,he was driving and hit a tree.Most F.T.O.'s will tell you to forget what you learned in the academy.This is up to you.The academy will train you,the F.T.O. ,hopefully will keep you alive.

Movie_tombstone_587x295_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 3 years ago

 

 Nothing could happen or everything could happen, no matter where you work or how "small" of an area you work. Remember what you have learned in the academy and FT but realize there probably will be alot of situations you're not really sure how to handle until you actually have to deal with it. Just use your common sense, you will make mistakes, but just make sure you come home at the end of your shift. Best advice I can give being a rookie myself. Goodluck!

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Rate This | Posted almost 3 years ago

 

 The only book that should tell you to forget everything you have been told is the Bible. I hate it when someone writes a book and says that in the first paragraph. What they're actually saying is that they are smarter than everyone else on the planet. 


Take what you learn at the academy and build on it. Your FTO will shape you into a better officer. I still learned something new everyday I was in a squad car. 


Lots of luck to you.