Law Enforcement Specialties >> All Other Types of Law Enforcement >> Police Officer/ EMT... does it happen?

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Police Officer/ EMT... does it happen?

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Posted almost 3 years ago

 

I've been an officer for about a year now and although I have no plans to switch sides, I'm interested in EMT studies.  I've been looking into EMT classes just to get the basic EMT certification to become a better first responder.  Would look good on a resume if I decide to switch departments?  Would it help my fellow brothers/sisters in red?  Would spending several months and money on an EMT class be a good idea? 

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Rate This | Posted almost 3 years ago

 

I am not a LEO, but I know of plenty Officfers that were EMTs and have kept their status up to date. In fact there is an RPD Officer who was an EMT has kept his EMT status current and is credited with saving the life of  RPD Officer Tony DiPonzio when he was shot in the back of the head on January 31, 2009. Had it not been for Paul and his training Tony would have died.


I am not positive but I also believe at least some if not all of NYPD ESU have WEMT status.


 


In IMHO it certainly wouldn't hurt to have.

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Rated +1 | Posted almost 3 years ago

 

Switch sides??? Last time I checked we and EMS are on the same side.  With that being said any training is a good thing.  If you are interested go for it.

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Rate This | Posted almost 3 years ago

 

Go for it.

Just_passin__thru_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 3 years ago

 

Good question.


Although an EMT cert might expand your potential in being an effective public safety person, is it practical to spend the time and money to do it ?


Some or most of the skills learned (and paid for) by you may come under scrutiny by your agency. They may not want you to exercise Advanced First Aid that would be in conflict with policy with your agency OR in conflict with contractual agreements with Fire and ambulance companies working within your jurisdiction. To extend any medical assistance beyond what you are trained in at an academy level might be setting you up for potential problems.


Let me flip flop it for you and see if this makes sense. An actual EMT or Paramedic decides they would like to 'expand' their effectiveness in the public safety sector by taking classes for Reserve Officer status. They pass the courses and now possess a certificate that declares them to be trained in a certain level of competency for law enforcement.


What would you tell them? Would you say, "I see you are a trained in law enforcement because you took some classes. Sure, if you have the chance, go right ahead and do my job when you roll up to a scene. When I get there, I will take over. And thanks !"


All I am asking is for you to switch roles and see if it's ok with you.


Am I way off base here?


Bottom line: Even though I might take training to be qualified as an EMT or Paramedic, would I also lug around all the equipment and tools of the trade just to have a better resume?


Exception to the rule: If you have a SWAT Team, they MAY require the talents of a Tactical Medic. That means you are on the Team but not as a tactical operator per se BUT you would deploy with the Team in the capacity of the Team Medic.


The Guy !
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Rate This | Posted almost 3 years ago

 

I've been a LEO for 31 years and a Paramedic for 26 years. Over the years there have been numerous times that I have used my medical training as a LEO and LEO training as a medic, not only to help the citizens we serve but to assist my co workers. Working primarily in rural areas, I have arrived on scene and been able to provide much needed medical treatment long before EMS arrival and assist short handed ambulance crews. Every Sheriff I have worked under has been very supportive of my medical training needs, and in my state, most medical training counts towards required LEO training hours.


I would agree that any training you can get is beneficial, so I would say go for it.

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Rate This | Posted almost 3 years ago

 

I agree with The Sarge. I was an ambulance attendant two years prior to being a cop. As a cop I always stepped aside as to not interfere with EMT personnel.

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Rate This | Posted almost 3 years ago

 

wcsocet says ...



I've been a LEO for 31 years and a Paramedic for 26 years. Over the years there have been numerous times that I have used my medical training as a LEO and LEO training as a medic, not only to help the citizens we serve but to assist my co workers. Working primarily in rural areas, I have arrived on scene and been able to provide much needed medical treatment long before EMS arrival and assist short handed ambulance crews. Every Sheriff I have worked under has been very supportive of my medical training needs, and in my state, most medical training counts towards required LEO training hours.


I would agree that any training you can get is beneficial, so I would say go for it.


++++++++++++


 


So, the question I have is this: Was your Medic training and application permitted by your agency? I know you used the word 'supportive' but legally, would they back you if a lawsuit arose from your Medic first aid? Would they cover you 360 degrees for any legal issues? If so, great !!! I know of a few agencies that require a medic or an EMT's certificate for employment. They are genuine "First Responders".


I am just saying that for the majority of agencies, application of 'above and beyond' Advanced First Aid may be .... may be an area that would not be covered by an agency.



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Rate This | Posted almost 3 years ago

 

Not a Leo but I agree with what's been stated...you could get into some liability issues depending on what you do.I would never tell anyone not to get more education but what will you do with this education is the key factor..I admire anyone that wants to top knotch their skills but how often will you use these skills if I was in your shoes the time I was going to spend on a EMT course I would spend it on addictional training through my work.. b/c that will look good on a resume also... The stuff you will learn as a EMT it is good training but how often will you utilize it other then the CPR? not sure what else you would do on a scene.....  you are already considered a first responder being a LEO :) now if you were to do that on the side for extra money that's totally worth it...the classes aren't as bad as you think either.. atleast  here their not , 3 days a week for 4 months right at 1500$ for tuition.. I've looked into doing it myself b/c I once thought I wanted to become a paramedic..good luck


 


In Life we should experience an adventure that will create a memory worth repeating.....unknown.....

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Rated +1 | Posted almost 3 years ago

 

I was an EMT before I became a cop, with a background in Search & Rescue and FD. My office has encouraged me to keep my certifications current, including allowing me to attend refreshers, obtain CE hours, etc., while on the clock. I am also a SWAT member and serve both on our assault/entry team and as a medic. When on patrol I administer care only to my agency's standard, which is basic first aid. When on a SWAT mission I am able to operate to the full extent of my certifications. (Our team is classified as an *ALS* non-transporting agency).


The important thing is to remember which "hat" you're wearing on a call. I just wrapped up my shift this morning with a full code (no respiration's/pulse) on a subject who OD'd. Once the EMT's and FD arrived and began working their mojo, I put my cop "hat" on and obtained witness info, etc.


And as far as the classes go, try contacting your local volunteer fire departments. Our VFD's host EMT courses several times a year, and the cost is less than $500.


A possible downside may be the amount of CE hours and training required to maintain certifications. Trying to keep up on those can be a royal pain in the behind, especially if your agency isn't thrilled with you taking the time to do so.

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Rate This | Posted almost 3 years ago

 

TheSarge says ...



wcsocet says ...



I've been a LEO for 31 years and a Paramedic for 26 years. Over the years there have been numerous times that I have used my medical training as a LEO and LEO training as a medic, not only to help the citizens we serve but to assist my co workers. Working primarily in rural areas, I have arrived on scene and been able to provide much needed medical treatment long before EMS arrival and assist short handed ambulance crews. Every Sheriff I have worked under has been very supportive of my medical training needs, and in my state, most medical training counts towards required LEO training hours.


I would agree that any training you can get is beneficial, so I would say go for it.


++++++++++++


 


So, the question I have is this: Was your Medic training and application permitted by your agency? I know you used the word 'supportive' but legally, would they back you if a lawsuit arose from your Medic first aid? Would they cover you 360 degrees for any legal issues? If so, great !!! I know of a few agencies that require a medic or an EMT's certificate for employment. They are genuine "First Responders".


I am just saying that for the majority of agencies, application of 'above and beyond' Advanced First Aid may be .... may be an area that would not be covered by an agency.




I'll try to clarify my situation a little here. As a Paramedic you must work under the license of a physician, When I first got certified in Colorado I discussed the situation at length with my Sheriff and the Physician Medical Director of the County ambulance. What it finally came down to was that the I was actually covered to practice as a Paramedic by the Medical Director and that the County Ambulance covered liability. The Sheriff (along with county Commissioners) agreed that I would be covered under the County blanket policy as medical assistance was actually part of my duties as a Deputy. After moving to Wyoming things changed a little. I am not a certified Paramedic with the state, as Wyoming does not accept National Registry, I have continued to provide medical care, although limited what I can legally do. The Sheriff here assures me that I will be backed completely by the County as long as I don't go beyond my scope of practice. The SO does continue to pay for my medical training as they do any other LEO training. The PD I have done some part time work for in South Dakota has also allowed a number of Officers to provide medical care and encouraged EMT training. I'm sure things are different from agency to agency and state to state, all I can do is let you all know what my experience has been


 

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Rate This | Posted almost 3 years ago

 

wcsocet says ...



I'll try to clarify my situation a little here. As a Paramedic you must work under the license of a physician, When I first got certified in Colorado I discussed the situation at length with my Sheriff and the Physician Medical Director of the County ambulance. What it finally came down to was that the I was actually covered to practice as a Paramedic by the Medical Director and that the County Ambulance covered liability. The Sheriff (along with county Commissioners) agreed that I would be covered under the County blanket policy as medical assistance was actually part of my duties as a Deputy. After moving to Wyoming things changed a little. I am not a certified Paramedic with the state, as Wyoming does not accept National Registry, I have continued to provide medical care, although limited what I can legally do. The Sheriff here assures me that I will be backed completely by the County as long as I don't go beyond my scope of practice. The SO does continue to pay for my medical training as they do any other LEO training. The PD I have done some part time work for in South Dakota has also allowed a number of Officers to provide medical care and encouraged EMT training. I'm sure things are different from agency to agency and state to state, all I can do is let you all know what my experience has been.


 


++++++++++++++++++++++


 


Excellent explanation.


I wonder if the OP is getting any of this ? He only posted once.


 



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Rate This | Posted almost 3 years ago

 

I have been in law enforcement several yrs now, a vol firefighter for 16 yrs and have been through EMT training twice. Once when I first started firefighting and the second about 3 yrs ago. It has helped greatly in both fields. I highly recomend doing it. Honestly, I have used my EMT training more "off duty" with family and friends than I thought I ever would. More knowledge is never a bad thing.

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Rate This | Posted almost 2 years ago

 

I was forced out of my former department due to budget cuts and I gained my EMT license to make me more hireable and because I had an interest in medicine. I have since joined a PD that requires all Officers to be licensed EMT's and we even have our own Police Ambulance.  I would not have been hired if I had not already had my EMT license.  Yes, it does make you more hireable but remember that once you're in, you're taking on two jobs at once.  I had to test into this region's Emergency Medical System (we fall under a different hospital/system than where I got my license) and I have to attend Continuing Education courses monthly just to keep my license up-to-date. Thats on top of my normal PD work schedule as well.  The EMT school I went through lasted 3 months and included the state exam.  It was difficult but its an excellent option. 


Keep in mind as well that once you get settled into your career, you could use that license to work part-time on an Ambulance or at a venue/business. 


I say go for it.


 


 

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Rate This | Posted almost 2 years ago

 

 I bump all comments and raise ya one.  GO FOR IT! You have nothing to lose :-)  and a whole lot to gain.


The glory of young men is their strength: and the beauty of old men is the grey head
- Proverbs 20:29

Nemo me impune lacessit

YaYa SuzieQ

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Rate This | Posted almost 2 years ago

 

Absolutely,the more training the better.Never know when you will need it.The more you perform these hands on things the more confidence you will build up too.I did a delivery and assisted in another and got the old ticker going on a couple other people.I definately wasn't the best around but our yearly five day refresher course was beneficial and the fact I was an Army medic helped.

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Rate This | Posted almost 2 years ago

 

California Highway Patrol Officers are also EMT's.

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Rate This | Posted almost 2 years ago

 

SkoolCop says ...



California Highway Patrol Officers are also EMT's.



Back in the early 70's San Diego Officers were also EMT's as SD Police also ran ambulances. I was trained and even went to work for an Ambulance Service for a couple of month before being hired by a PD. I do not think that they even took notice of it. While OTJ I only had to perform basic first aid or assess individual triage for responding EMT's so that they could get to those that needed help first. I once used my EMT skills on a man who was shot in the chest to make sure he was alive when EMT's arrived and the situation was secure as this individual would have died if I hadn't. Because he lived I received a nice Commendation from the city because it made THEM look good and they even took credit for my training! LOL!

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Rate This | Posted almost 2 years ago

 

As was said it is always good to have additional training and knowledge and KUDOS to those that do and get to use it. Just research the agency you are interested in and look at their GO's and SOP's to see if they will sanction the training. Let them ask you during the interview process because they will see it on your resume, so likley they will ask, but everyone brings up valid considerations. Apparently there are many places that encourage and allow you to use it, so your training and experience will be reviewed and discussed...