Law Enforcement Specialties >> Campus Law Enforcement >> The difference btw school and regular Officer

+1

The difference btw school and regular Officer

2,090 Views
12 Replies Flag as inappropriate
1979_max50

3272 posts

back to top

Posted almost 4 years ago

 

Okay guys, forgive the ignorance on this but just what in the hell is the difference between a School Cop and a Regular Cop or Deputy? Here where I live the Deputies that are assigned to the schools are regular Deputies who have been pulled from the road or have volunteered to work in the schools. They can be re-assigned back to the road and sometimes are if they show signs of burning out. Is this the case in other areas? It seems that some jurisdictions have Officers that are actually hired specifically as school cops. I am not talking about the collages but the public schools like HS or middle school. What's the deal and if they are hired specifically as school cops what are the requirements and schooling and training that they go through that is different than regular cops? Also, what authority do they carry? Do they have the same authority as a regular Officer or is it limited to the school property or things related to the schools only or what. I would like to know what the different localities do.

-44 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted almost 4 years ago

 

Where I'm from it was the same as you said. Road deputies pulled off the road to work the school. However, they have to go through SRO School, which is a 5 week course in Juvenile Law, and the Do, and Don't of working in a school environment, and also (now) special concentration on active shooter drills.

My_hk_p2000_sk_v2_max50

449 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted almost 4 years ago

 

Here in Arkansas.  The norm is as you described it with certified police officers.  They're called, "School Recource Officers" where I'm from, and are in most of the larger school districts in the state that work Jr. & High schools.  During the week and at functions like ball games etc..  But, when schools are closed for the summer, the SRO's go back to the streets in patrol.


But I have heard or been told that some of the smallest rural school districts, where the local LEO agency doesn't have the manpower to assign an LEO/SRO, there are people hired as, "School Security Officers" who are not certified LE officers.  School SO's are not armed & don't have the authority to make arrest, following school disctrict policy only.  These people might be what you referred to as, "School Cop" but I'm not sure about that.  Have not heard that term used here.  And then there are smaller, rural LEO agencies who have an officer spend time at the schools a few times during the week, when not busy on patrol during the day, but are subject to answering calls.


As for the SRO's at my former department.  They have a manual basically written by the school district with input from the LE agency on what they are expected to do, and they do enforce all laws.  There is another smaller group of cops assigned to the Training Div, (I'm sure you're aware of), who are DARE Officers at the elementary schools only, and they attend a school for certification as DARE Officers, but also serve as SRO's while on the school grounds and rotate amoung all of the elementary schools in the city during the week.  Along with the DARE activity, they also have to follow the SRO Policy.  But that's what I was familiar with having worked for a municipal LE agency (while in the Training Div) and also having lived in a rural area.  Don't know if I answered your questions adequately.  But it might add to some of the responses yet to come to your OP.  Good luck with it brother!     

Avatar_max160_max160_max50

2600 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted almost 4 years ago

 

Here in Texas the legislature they allowed independant school districts to create their own police departments.  They are required to have the same training as municipal, county and state officers.  Some PD's are as large as over 200 sworn officers.  Here in SA there are about 9 ISD PDs. 


Many officer transfer from DPS or municipal PD for the hours.  Most officers assigned to a campus work 8-4 M-F with wekends off.  They enjoy the same schedule as their kids.  Many have Xmas and spring break off because they work less days a year. 


Hello my name is Inigo Montoya, you killed my father, prepare to die.

"It's not a constitutional violation for a police officer to be a jerk." Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy -December 4, 2000

Bdulrge7old_max50

2008 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted almost 4 years ago

 

When I was still teaching in Charlotte, the Officer we had in the school was Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police (CMPD), the school district paid CMPD for their services to be in the school. We had Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools (CMS)Security agents, they were different. No weapons, nothing just a radio and simply escorted kids to and from where ever, do removals when called for by the teacher etc. The Officers were called School Resource Officers also. When I recruited in Southern Utah, the local PD also provided SRO's to the school district. Now having said all that, CMS does have a small Police Force. I have only ever seen them at the school I taught at a few times, mostly only the CMS Security agents and CMPD Officers.


Certified wiseacre. Proudly serving since 1986.
USAF Aircrew Flight Equipment "Your Life is Our Business, We're the Last to Let You Down!"
Shut up, listen up and put on your teflon suit!

Bring back Reagan and Patton.......

Good-guysjpg-a87be92e015c863e_max50

548 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted almost 4 years ago

 

Our SRO's in the county I police in are attached to the school board. They only have jurisdiction on school grounds, buses, and anything that originated at the school.


R.I.P "Macho Man" Randy Savage

1979_max50

3272 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted almost 4 years ago

 

ten8, do you know what kind of training they go through? Do they have to attend a regular police academy?

Jack_bauer_max50

455 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted almost 4 years ago

 

jakesdad says ...



Here in Texas the legislature they allowed independant school districts to create their own police departments.  They are required to have the same training as municipal, county and state officers.  Some PD's are as large as over 200 sworn officers.  Here in SA there are about 9 ISD PDs. 


Many officer transfer from DPS or municipal PD for the hours.  Most officers assigned to a campus work 8-4 M-F with wekends off.  They enjoy the same schedule as their kids.  Many have Xmas and spring break off because they work less days a year. 



Ditto, School Distrct police officers must be state certified and academy trained. Most like me, came from other jurisdictions and enjoy the hours(days w/ weekends off), the OT(all the games) and we get the same days off the students. So basically we get about a month off without using vacation time. In the summers we patrol the districts.


The training is the same as are the standards. The jursidictions vary by school board, but if a case requires us to leave for investigative or arrest purposes, then we have those same abilities. I guess we are lucky in that Texas doesn't segregate police officer's powers, but leave it up to the govern authority and department.


The mission is solely for district needs as they are the employer. Hence, working school zones as apposed to working a strip of road on the highway or downtown, yet, we don't necessarily ignore violations if committed in front of us.

25-1-13-a_1__max50

2248 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted almost 4 years ago

 

Allen705 says ...



jakesdad says ...



Here in Texas the legislature they allowed independant school districts to create their own police departments.  They are required to have the same training as municipal, county and state officers.  Some PD's are as large as over 200 sworn officers.  Here in SA there are about 9 ISD PDs. 


Many officer transfer from DPS or municipal PD for the hours.  Most officers assigned to a campus work 8-4 M-F with wekends off.  They enjoy the same schedule as their kids.  Many have Xmas and spring break off because they work less days a year. 



Ditto, School Distrct police officers must be state certified and academy trained. Most like me, came from other jurisdictions and enjoy the hours(days w/ weekends off), the OT(all the games) and we get the same days off the students. So basically we get about a month off without using vacation time. In the summers we patrol the districts.


The training is the same as are the standards. The jursidictions vary by school board, but if a case requires us to leave for investigative or arrest purposes, then we have those same abilities. I guess we are lucky in that Texas doesn't segregate police officer's powers, but leave it up to the govern authority and department.


The mission is solely for district needs as they are the employer. Hence, working school zones as apposed to working a strip of road on the highway or downtown, yet, we don't necessarily ignore violations if committed in front of us.



In California, there are a few school districts who have created (because of the need) their own police departments.  They are California P.O.S.T. approved departments and require the officers to have the exact same training as police officers and sheriff deputies for all other law enforcement agency in the state.  One of the largest School Police Departments in California is the Los Angeles Unified School District Police Department with over 300 sworn officers.  They patrol and provide LE services for the 2nd largest school district in California.  By comparison, the school district where I am employed is the 6th largest school district in the state and has a total of 20 sworn officers providing the LE services which include SRO's at 5 (soon to be 6) regular high schools.  I find it interesting that when speaking with officers from the local city and county agencies, they don't care to where our shoes and most would say that they don't like working with the kids that would make up our clientele.  I think it interesting in that our clientele today becomes their clientele tomorrow. 

1979_max50

3272 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted almost 4 years ago

 

SkoolCop said; " I find it interesting that when speaking with officers from the local city and county agencies, they don't care to where our shoes and most would say that they don't like working with the kids that would make up our clientele.  I think it interesting in that our clientele today becomes their clientele tomorrow."


<LOL> You got that right Bro but there is a difference. When you have them they are all considered Juvies and are treated as such by law even though they are just as, and in many cases worse than the adults we come in contact with. The big difference is that when we get them, they are adults and we can slap them down a bit harder and they face the Big Boy jail. You don't get the whiny "but they are just misguided children that need to be loved" crap that you do. Then again, we get the whiny "they were mistreated as a child and unloved" crap. <VBG>

Avatar_max160_max160_max50

2600 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted almost 4 years ago

 

Robocop33 says ...



SkoolCop said; " I find it interesting that when speaking with officers from the local city and county agencies, they don't care to where our shoes and most would say that they don't like working with the kids that would make up our clientele.  I think it interesting in that our clientele today becomes their clientele tomorrow."


<LOL> You got that right Bro but there is a difference. When you have them they are all considered Juvies and are treated as such by law even though they are just as, and in many cases worse than the adults we come in contact with. The big difference is that when we get them, they are adults and we can slap them down a bit harder and they face the Big Boy jail. You don't get the whiny "but they are just misguided children that need to be loved" crap that you do. Then again, we get the whiny "they were mistreated as a child and unloved" crap. <VBG>


 


 



Here in Texas, the 17 year olds are adults. I see many freshman and sophmore "adults" go to Big Boy Jail.


Hello my name is Inigo Montoya, you killed my father, prepare to die.

"It's not a constitutional violation for a police officer to be a jerk." Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy -December 4, 2000

25-1-13-a_1__max50

2248 posts

back to top
+1

Rated +1 | Posted almost 4 years ago

 

Robocop33 says ...



SkoolCop said; " I find it interesting that when speaking with officers from the local city and county agencies, they don't care to where our shoes and most would say that they don't like working with the kids that would make up our clientele.  I think it interesting in that our clientele today becomes their clientele tomorrow."


<LOL> You got that right Bro but there is a difference. When you have them they are all considered Juvies and are treated as such by law even though they are just as, and in many cases worse than the adults we come in contact with. The big difference is that when we get them, they are adults and we can slap them down a bit harder and they face the Big Boy jail. You don't get the whiny "but they are just misguided children that need to be loved" crap that you do. Then again, we get the whiny "they were mistreated as a child and unloved" crap. <VBG>



Robocop33 says:  "in many cases worse than the adults we come in contact with."


Oh yeah........ I am all kinds of aware of this fact.  I remind them on a regular basis that one of three things will happen if they continue their course.  FIRST:  They will find themselves doing something that will get them charged as adults or SECOND:  they will continue the behavior into adulthood and find themselves in for a very rude awakening.  THIRD:  They might just find themselves dead.  I run into many of them as they have passed into adulthood and find myself telling them "I TOLD YOU SO" as they did the first two.  I read about group number three.