PoliceLink Feedback & Feature Requests >> From the Desk of TheSarge >> Security Guards & Private Security personnel

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Security Guards & Private Security personnel

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Just_passin__thru_max50

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Posted almost 4 years ago

 

I have come a long long way to even strike up a conversation about this subject but here goes.


Security personnel have a place in the law enforcement community.


Ok, don't come unglued and put whatever you've got in your hand and lay it gently on the table.


I have been thinking about this for a long time. I DO NOT think it is a grand idea to call any security person an 'officer' or an 'agent'. Loose use of those titles inevitably lead to long winded fights about ownership. As a cop, I own the word cop. Anything short of the training afforded a sworn, certified, authentic, vetted and genuine law enforcement officer/deputy/agent/trooper/mountie/etc. is not a cop. Tradition and customs say as much and leading a potential employee by the upper lip of 'disception' by referring to him/her as an officer is misleading.


Now, that said, we see a fast enlarging population of people who take on security positions because (generally) they are easier to land, prehiring qualifications are easier than going through a police academy and (realistically) the pay is very low. AND, depending on some of those security job requirements, some of those folks are carrying guns. AND, more and more employers are hiring security people versus hiring back off-duty cops.


My suggestion is this. It has actually has my M.O. for many years on the job.


Consider those in Security jobs as necessary and important. Even consider their work as a type of partnership with law enforcement officers. Heck, I have promoted the idea in communities that 'you and I are partners together in solving this problem.' Why not extend the same 'partnership' with security people?


No, I will not relinguish the idea of calling a security person an 'officer'. Too misleading. I don't think anyone calls a prison guard a 'prison officer'. He's a guard. Security personnel are not officers. When you dial 9-1-1, does an operator on the other end offer to send a security guard?


Ok, I have forgotten stuff here. And I am sure you can offer a lively response, maybe a counter-response.


But, am I wrong in suggesting we draw security people closer rather than continuing to perpetuate the chasm or gap of differences in job responsibilities?


(And no, I am not selling out. Just asking the question(s).


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Rated +1 | Posted almost 4 years ago

 

I don't think we, as LEO, can lay claim to the term Officer. The term itself means a Person assigned responsibility over a Corporation, Ship, society, etc. Lawyers are termed as "Officers of the Court" yet they are not LEO. In the Military, you have The Enlisted Personnel, and Officers. Any NCO can sign for a Range and, if properly certified (a 6 hour class that I have taken) can be a Range Safety Officer. This does not make him any higher rank that a LT or Capt., except when they step on that range. When a Security Officer (yeah, I said it) takes his post he is assigned responsibility for that area. Also I have worked with a lot of Security Guards/ Officers/ Whatever, that were either Off duty (moonlighting for extra cash) or retired LEO. I have also met some that got paid better than I did as an LEO. It all depends on where, and who they work for really. On the Flip side of that coin, I have met some that barely pass muster to be called Guards. Those are typically the types that are your wannabes. My thing is, I don't think we have the right to lay claim to the term Officer. Cop? Yeah, we got that one hands down. Officer, maybe not so much. Just my opinion.

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Rate This | Posted almost 4 years ago

 

I hate to admit it but Jason has a good point.


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bill9823 says ...



I hate to admit it but Jason has a good point.



LOL. Thanks Bill.

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Rate This | Posted almost 4 years ago

 

Going to have to disagree with you. I have no problem calling them officers and if they have chevrons or rail road tracks I address them by their rank. I feel it is an ego boost for them and see no harm. Some find the term Guard demeaning.

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Rated +1 | Posted almost 4 years ago

 

I am a security guard/officer or what ever you feel the need to call me, but we do almost the same things out there, we all protect people when asked to and investigate crimes on our watch when it happens on the property we are there to protect. But to me I could care less what I am called as long as I am doing my job, I dont understand why this even matters. I own my security business and I am a private investigater, I love my job. So that being said go ahead and hate me its cool. But the communuties I served appreciate me and my service to them.

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uncledennis1 says ...



Going to have to disagree with you. I have no problem calling them officers and if they have chevrons or rail road tracks I address them by their rank. I feel it is an ego boost for them and see no harm. Some find the term Guard demeaning.


++++++++++++++++

Hmmmmmm...... here again I sense regional differences.


I can see and understand the legitimacy of one area feeling ok with referring to anyone wearing a badge as 'officer'. When recources are thin, heck, I'd call him 'Mom' if it covered my hiney.


However, where I am from anonymous conjestion is how it is. And many many wannabes are just cheap idiots who claim more than they are, simply because their minimum wage employer chooses to call them 'officer'. The title Officer carries the same weight as 'cop' in my radial area of 700 miles.... and 600 miles of that in one direction is ocean.


Shetland, I am not so much giving anyone an ego boost. I need people with good people skills, high end officer safety abilities and common sensibilities.


But back to my comment, the value of security personnel is invaluable. But there should not be any blurring of who's who in the zoo.


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Rate This | Posted almost 4 years ago

 

I think unless you are blind or just have no clue, everyone knows a security guard/officer is just that. I certainly can tell the difference between the two. I agree it is a regional thing because I have been in different states and some are called guard and some are called officers.


Again there are many security personel that carry themselves well and then there are the ones that give the good ones a bad name.


"The hottest places in hell are reserved for those who, in times of moral crisis, do nothing." Dante

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bill9823 says ...



I think unless you are blind or just have no clue, everyone knows a security guard/officer is just that. I certainly can tell the difference between the two. I agree it is a regional thing because I have been in different states and some are called guard and some are called officers.


Again there are many security personel that carry themselves well and then there are the ones that give the good ones a bad name.


+++++++++++++++

And the pitch is on the way....


Low, inside, the swing and BSL tags the ball. It's hit hard. It's going into deep left field. The Fans are on their feet. Deep, Deeep, aaaand ..... Home Run. Over the fence. 315 feet. Home Run. HOME RUN and the fans are roooaring !!!


Well said. You, I mean.


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TheSarge says ...



Shetland, I am not so much giving anyone an ego boost. I need people with good people skills, high end officer safety abilities and common sensibilities.



 


So what is to say that any particular Security Guard, or Officer, doesn't have these qualities? Like I mentioned earlier, a lot of the Security personnel I've dealt with are either Off duty Cops makin a little salad on the side working for a security company, or retired Cops. Do they Lose the qualities that make them good Cops when they exchange one uniform for another? Or one badge for another? Or lay down the Guns for a few shifts a week?

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BSL1123 says ...



TheSarge says ...



Shetland, I am not so much giving anyone an ego boost. I need people with good people skills, high end officer safety abilities and common sensibilities.


nbsp;
 
So what is to say that any particular Security Guard, or Officer, doesn't have these qualities? Like I mentioned earlier, a lot of the Security personnel I've dealt with are either Off duty Cops makin a little salad on the side working for a security company, or retired Cops. Do they Lose the qualities that make them good Cops when they exchange one uniform for another? Or one badge for another? Or lay down the Guns for a few shifts a week?
 

+++++++++++++++++

Nope, not implying lack of qualities. I am stating what I want IS those qualities. And the security industry is replete with less than those qualities.


And, yeah, I get it. I know that some LEO guys do a little security on the side (sometimes in thin jeopardy with FLSA rules) and a few retirees land jobs to bump their pensions. And we know that good retired cops know how to do a great job in the security field.


But as mentioned, you can usually spot who knows a basket from a gasket. And you can also pretty much know who you would feel comfortable with down and in the dirt with a suspect. AND, I am suggesting that most security guards do not have equal training as a cop. That is a given. I just don't want the waters to be muddied with a blending of who's who.


My premise is to draw closer to the security guys and recognize they are an important element in LEO-land but are intrinsically not cops. I love our PL supporters but they already know it doesn't make them de facto LEO's because they know a lot or are liked by the LEO community.


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Rate This | Posted almost 4 years ago

 

My state registers Security personnel as "Officers" so that is the term I use.  However, I've worked with many SG's that as a manager, I wouldn't want working for me because they showed no respect for themselves, the job, or the client site/personnel, and that thought they were LEOs.  I've also worked with more than a few that took pride in their uniform, showed respect and civility to everyone, carried them(our)selves as professionals, and knew when only a LEO could do something that they (we) couldn't.


If some (LEOs included) call us security guards, I generally don't mind because the perception of security personnel isn't that great, and usually only people that are registered with my state know how we're registered.

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Sarge, as you said before. . . .English is such an interesting language.


With that said. . . .we are back to a regional understandings of what words mean.  In one thread someone made mention of ". . .saluting the stars and bars. . .".  Interesting because what they meant was the "Stars and Stripes" or "The Grand Ole Flag" or whatever else you want to call the flag that I pledge MY allegiance to. . .the U.S. Flag!  When I hear (read) "Stars and Bars", I automatically think of the "Rebel Flag" or what is actually the flag of the Confederate U.S..


I have personally seen the word "Officer" used not only with police personnel, but also military, courts and other organizations that have modeled their command staff after the MILITARY. . .not the police.  I have looked up the term "officer" and one of the definitions was ". . .one who manages."  Wouldn't you agree that a "Security Officer" is a person that manages a piece of property in absence of the owner. . .or as the "Agent" of the owner?  From the area that I am from. . . .the term "officer" was perfectly acceptable to be used in describing someone that is supposed to be the eyes and ears of the police.  With that said, I fail to see the necessity of drawing a line over a word.  So, do the security guards then have to move to the back of the bus when we get on because of a term that someone is trying to reserve for the elites?  While they are not "our equals" (off duty police officers excluded) if we are trying to "embrace" them. . .why is there such a big deal made over a simple word?  After all, if it is to try to keep that word untarnished. . . sorry, that bridge has been crossed a long time ago.  Look at the police officers of the old west. . . .many of them were bouncing back and forth across that line between officer and criminal.


Oh and by the way. . . .during my academy, one of my fellow "recruits" made a mistake one day when asking a question dealing with police officers.  As it was some 15 1/2 years ago, I do not remember the exact question but during the course of that question he referred to police officers as "COPS".  The Sergeant in charge of the academy class stopped the question in mid-question and asked the recruit 3 times what he called the officers because the recruit didn't "get it" until the 3rd time when his reference was to the "officers".  The Sergeant then went on to instruct us that the term "COPS" was a derrogatory term and I have viewed it that way ever since.  So, if you would like to continue to lay claim to the term "COP" that is fine with me. . . .just realize that there are some "Police Officers" that view that term as a slap in the face.


I won't be wronged, I won't be insulted, and I won't be laid a hand on. I don't do these things to other people and I expect the same from them.

John Bernard Books, from "The Shootist"

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Rated +1 | Posted almost 4 years ago

 

 


The debate of this topic makes me laugh. It is a name or title.
Let’s look at the word “Officer”
What other ways is the word “Officer” used…..
Military Officer
Chief Officer typically the person in charge of the deck department of a merchant ship
Corrections officer
Customs officer
Officer of the court
Parking enforcement officer
Probation officer/Parole officer
Law enforcement officer (Peace officer)
Police officer
Chief Medical Officer
Presiding Officer
Bank officer
Chief academic officer
Merchant marine officer or licensed mariner
Officer of arms
If you look at the word “Officer” it is used more in non law enforcement capacity
Dictionary:
One who holds an office of authority or trust in an organization, such as a corporation or government. A person licensed in the merchant marine as master, mate, chief engineer, or assistant engineer. One who holds a commission in the armed forces.
Some believe the word “Officer” belongs to a certain title, well that is fine if it strokes their ego, I say does it matter?

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Rate This | Posted almost 4 years ago

 

What did I step in ... ?


Ok, I concede that our language is a bit sketchy concerning what we say concerning officers, cops, agents, etc. No consistency.


And I am getting the feedback from you guys that there is more liberality in how 'things' are handled in different area.  And generally these are specific to the areas where you work and live.


Thanks for the input so far.


But let me ask: Is the question I pose valid? I mean to draw closer to SG's as a whole OR is my question still regional in it's origin? Is it something that has been worked out elsewhere but not to a larger extent where I am from?


I think I can accept that as more or less true. We have more problems with SG's who claim more than they are equipped to handle.


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amy_james says ...



I am a security guard/officer or what ever you feel the need to call me, but we do almost the same things out there, we all protect people when asked to and investigate crimes on our watch when it happens on the property we are there to protect. But to me I could care less what I am called as long as I am doing my job, I dont understand why this even matters. I own my security business and I am a private investigater, I love my job. So that being said go ahead and hate me its cool. But the communuties I served appreciate me and my service to them.



Retleo says..........


Uhhhh, NO, we don't do "almost the same things".  While I appreciate the job that Security Services provide please don;t make the mistake of thinking that our jobs are the same. I am a retired LEO (30 years) and now own my own private investigation business, believe me, there is a very BIG difference between a police officer and a security guard/officer.


"Be a yardstick of quality. Some people aren't used to an environment where excellence is expected."
Steve Jobs

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Rate This | Posted almost 4 years ago

 

The language is sketchy due to regional differences, Sarge, but your point and question is still valid.


There are a lot of SG's that think they're LEOs and are wannabe LEOs that give the professional SG's a bad name, in addition to the "average" SG.


That being said, Sarge, I think it's great that you're trying to bring the two sides closer together.  There are SG's that bite off more than they can chew, sometimes frighteningly often.  Those are the ones I don't want working for or with me, and no LEO has good memories of.  Hope this thread clears the air somewhat.

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I guess your original "question" (besides the one referencing terminology) is a valid question as the TURF WAR between Police and Security is similar to the TURF WAR that allowed 911 because the feds DIDN'T WANT TO TALK TO EACH OTHER. . .much less anyone else.  Are we so "ELITE" that we can not come down off of our throne to talk with the little people that could make or break our case in court?


Security Officers should be treated as our eyes and ears for a particular area so we can spend more of our time dealing with other issues.  Think about it. . . if we were to "bridge that gap" between police and security we would have MORE eyes and ears out there instead of just our own.  The thing about the security people, is that they are on site during the entire shift and if they are competent. . .will actually KNOW what is going in the WHOLE neighborhood, letting us know if something is out of place.  Otherwise, with that "BOND" that we are supposed to establish with the public, we are freed up to "police" other areas of our patrol area.  WHY WASTE THAT TOOL IN OUR TOOL BOX?


I won't be wronged, I won't be insulted, and I won't be laid a hand on. I don't do these things to other people and I expect the same from them.

John Bernard Books, from "The Shootist"

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tiggerxer says ...



 (see above)


+++++++++++++

It appears by your albums that you are a security person.


I am curious..... why didn't you state that in your comment? And why was you first and only comment in this particular discussion?


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TheSarge says ...



tiggerxer says ...



 (see above)


+++++++++++++

It appears by your albums that you are a security person.


I am curious..... why didn't you state that in your comment? And why was you first and only comment in this particular discussion?



He is policelink.monster.com/member/amy_james her hubby


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I think a portion of the misstep may have been my fault and I apologize. My first response on this particular subject focused mainly on laying claim to a word, and I don't think that was the intent of the thread at all, but merely a portion of the original thought process, that I pulled out and focused on. So, for that, I apologize again. However, I do find this thread to be a good post in so much as it's redefining the "line in the sand" between security Personnel, and Law Enforcement Personnel. We have some members here on PL that are in the Security Field, and I would be MORE than happy to Call Officer, and also MORE than happy to have their cooperation in any investigation I have to do inside their area. The first two that Jump out (top of my head. I'm sure there are more) are Elaken, and Our Very Own Moderator RdnkFiredad. Both very well spoken individuals, and quick to take pride in what they do. I think TheSarge's original Intent was to, as I said, redefine that line in the sand, while still bringing the Security Personnel "into the Fold" so to speak. There are those out there, and we've all seen them, who wouldn't know a gig line if it slapped em in the face. And there are those who can't even see where the Shirt, and Trousers meet. But lets face it folks. We have some of the very same types working in LE. While there may not be as many, and it may not be glaringly obvious like it is in Security, they are out there.


Also, MSP, I'm not calling you out, and it may be due to regional differences as well, but you said a couple of things that came across to me as maybe disrespectful. You mentioned that Security "are not equals". I find that to be way off. They are (the ones I chose to focus on) professionals in their own right. Then again, in a later post you said "Little people". I don't know if you were trying to say that some LEO regard themsleves as "Higher and Mightier". Just a couple of thoughts. And also, on the term "COP", it was originally coined in the Midwest back when the Constable was the Big Cheese in the land, and it stood for Constable On Patrol, as the Constable back then also had the Jail, and the Courthouse instead of the Sheriff. It's not a derogatory term per se, but some Police Officers think it is because the Constables Deputies back then were not very well vetted, and hence did more harm than good. Of course, that is not the case nowadays.

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While we have talked about security personnel (SP), there ia one thing that I have noticed, especially with some of the CA security companies.  They will have a uniform that is very much like a LE uniform (dark green BDU type pants, dk green shirt, 7 point star, should er patches that you have to examine closely to see they say security, and the like, it makes it much easier for the security personnel to behave as if they are LEO's, other security companies have uniforms that are no so LE like, I previously worked for Wackenhut/G4S and our uniform pants had a purple stripe and a badge that says GAS (actually G4S, but it looks like gas, and not similar to any LE badges in this area), I have never seen a LE agency with purple striped pants  (one may exist, but I don't know of it),


To add insult to injury, the companies that have very LE like uniforms seem to attract the 'wanna - be's or can't be's, since they look more like LEO's when they are in their SP uniforms.


The majority of SPs I have met as a LEO are 'good people' but there does seem to be a fair # of SPs who do overstep their bounds and try to project themselves as LEO's.


While the majority of SP di not make more that LEO's there are some higher paying jobs, and while i won't say what I make, I currently make more/hr. at my SP job that at my (Small town rural) LE agency.


i agree with BSL and some of the others on terminology, i don't think officer should be reserved for commisssioned police/sheriffs, ect, we can call ourseves LEO to distingush ourselves from other tyes of officers 

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In my area we usually call them secrity officer.  That seems to be the current title, we use to call them security guards but not any more.  The biggest swing I see is with the store detectives.  We use to call them store detectives, then loss prevention officers, on to asset protection officers, and most recently they are asset protection agents.  Even then different stores call their store detectives by different names.


What I agree with as far as Sarge, is that there seems to be an effort by security companies/employees to inflate their status.  They want to be recognized as professionals but for whatever reason never rise to that level.  I have delt with good and bad with security guards and the best are not on par with the police,(but it seems they want to be)  and the worst are, well the worst. 


I'll call them whatever they want me to call them so long as it isn't cop.  I think cop, deputy, and trooper are synonymous with cop.  Officer I don't really get much heartburn over. 


until each state gets good standards for security persons with clear duties and training this debate will go on.  I've never met anyone who's life ambition was to be a security guard.  Even those who run these businesses will admit that was not what they wanted to do when they grew up.  The bottom line is most who do security work do it solely for the money which is not wrong but different than most cops. 


My statements here are general from a lifetime of observations, yes I know some security guards are very professional in appearance and actions.  But having seen their reports and watched them on the witness stand I have yet to encounter a security guard who is a true professional.


 

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mmmm says ...



In my area we usually call them secrity officer.  That seems to be the current title, we use to call them security guards but not any more.  The biggest swing I see is with the store detectives.  (et al...)


+++++++++++++++++++++ 



Sadly, I have to bump this.  The good SGs generally go on to become LEOs.  The bad SGs generally stay or move on elsewhere, either because they aren't employable as a LEO or they've tarnished the uniform.

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mmmm, you should meet me I work both as a LEO ( I love my job) and as a security person (for the money) but am professional at the latter, in fact i am usually the one to do incident reports as I am good at it (probably a carry over from all my LEO reports).  The  other security person on my shift is retired federal LE officer as well (and he does it for the money as well).

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BSL1123 says ...



I think a portion of the misstep may have been my fault and I apologize. (et al ...)


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


As for the term COP. . . . .you can believe whatever you want to believe as that subject has come up before on these threads also.  From what I have read both on these threads and from private readings,nobody and I repeat NOBODY. . .not even Widipedia knows where the term came from and Widipedia defines COP as . . . . "Cop is a slang term for a police official.".  You can say that it comes from Constable on Patrol. . . .but admit it. . . .you don't know for sure.  Don't know how old you are (as the actual number is not important here) but I remember some (not all because I was a bit young then myself) of the 60's and no matter what dignified meaning "COP" had before then, it became a slang term synonymous with "PIG".  Police officers have since re-worked that one to try to find some respectable meaning other than the obvious and the one I remember was. . . ."Pride, Intergrity, Guts".  It still is. . .what it is. . .a slang term to try to identify police officers with a farm animal that no-one wants around until it comes time for a ham and cheese sandwich. . . .both of which, COPS and PIG, I find offensive for fellow officers to just throw about seeing as how most everyone on this site claims to see law enforcement as a time honored respectable career. . . .even if people out west in the late 1800's did their best to disparage the career with their own greed.



I won't be wronged, I won't be insulted, and I won't be laid a hand on. I don't do these things to other people and I expect the same from them.

John Bernard Books, from "The Shootist"

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Retleo says ...



amy_james says ...



I am a security guard/officer or what ever you feel the need to call me, but we do almost the same things out there, we all protect people when asked to and investigate crimes on our watch when it happens on the property we are there to protect. But to me I could care less what I am called as long as I am doing my job, I dont understand why this even matters. I own my security business and I am a private investigater, I love my job. So that being said go ahead and hate me its cool. But the communuties I served appreciate me and my service to them.



Retleo says..........


Uhhhh, NO, we don't do "almost the same things".  While I appreciate the job that Security Services provide please don;t make the mistake of thinking that our jobs are the same. I am a retired LEO (30 years) and now own my own private investigation business, believe me, there is a very BIG difference between a police officer and a security guard/officer.



Which is why we sometimes have problems with Security people. They honestly do think we are almost the same and do the same work. There are many great Security people out there but unfortunately there are many who have inflated egos and a number that are just plain nuts. While waiting for my application to be processed between LEO jobs I actually took a position as a security guard with a private manufacturer. They actually looked down on me as someone that needed to be taught how to secure the buildings even though they knew I had almost 10 years in as a LEO! The entire group were either vastly overweight and out of shape or lazy or barely able to walk and chew gum. Additionally the supervisor was banging one of the females on the job! (Mission impossible as they were both very obese) I was very glad to get out of there within two months. Like I said, many are good guys and gals but there are so many that are jerks it hurts the rest of them. Do we need them, yeah, but they need to realize that they are JUST our extended eyes and ears and that is the best way to help not only us, but the people they work for.

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Retleo says ...



amy_james says ...



I am a security guard/officer or what ever you feel the need to call me, but we do almost the same things out there, we all protect people when asked to and investigate crimes on our watch when it happens on the property we are there to protect. But to me I could care less what I am called as long as I am doing my job, I dont understand why this even matters. I own my security business and I am a private investigater, I love my job. So that being said go ahead and hate me its cool. But the communuties I served appreciate me and my service to them.



Retleo says..........


Uhhhh, NO, we don't do "almost the same things".  While I appreciate the job that Security Services provide please don;t make the mistake of thinking that our jobs are the same. I am a retired LEO (30 years) and now own my own private investigation business, believe me, there is a very BIG difference between a police officer and a security guard/officer.



The only difference is the power to arrest, like I said I love my job and I do protect and serve many community also, we help assist many police officers and respond to incidents when they are tied up with others. I am so glad here in Michigan the depts we work with love having us around, they dont down grade us. And my company has a least 90 percent of police officers working for us as a second job, does this make them less of a police officer because they changed uniforms?

Photo_user_banned_big

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Rate This | Posted almost 4 years ago

 

I hate to say this, but in all my years in LE I never came accross a LEO that happened to like SG's. They may be out there, I just never knew any. So much so, that many times when approaching one of them, they have identified themselves as "I'm a Retired P.O" while wearing a SG uniform. Seems they realize they will be treated "different".


Personally, I don't hate them, I think they have a function, a task to accomplish, but I would refrain from calling that task "a part in LE". Rather, I would call it "a LE resource". They may be extremely useful in some circumstances as that "very good witness" you need to solve a puzzle or to PREVENT that specific incident.


"Old warriors never die, they just fade away." General MacArthur.

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Rate This | Posted almost 4 years ago

 

amy_james says ...



Retleo says ...



amy_james says ...



I am a security guard/officer or what ever you feel the need to call me, but we do almost the same things out there, we all protect people when asked to and investigate crimes on our watch when it happens on the property we are there to protect. But to me I could care less what I am called as long as I am doing my job, I dont understand why this even matters. I own my security business and I am a private investigater, I love my job. So that being said go ahead and hate me its cool. But the communuties I served appreciate me and my service to them.



Retleo says..........


Uhhhh, NO, we don't do "almost the same things".  While I appreciate the job that Security Services provide please don;t make the mistake of thinking that our jobs are the same. I am a retired LEO (30 years) and now own my own private investigation business, believe me, there is a very BIG difference between a police officer and a security guard/officer.



The only difference is the power to arrest, like I said I love my job and I do protect and serve many community also, we help assist many police officers and respond to incidents when they are tied up with others. I am so glad here in Michigan the depts we work with love having us around, they dont down grade us. And my company has a least 90 percent of police officers working for us as a second job, does this make them less of a police officer because they changed uniforms?


Retleo says....


"The only difference is the power to arrest", REALLY????? What kind of background investigation do Security guards/officers undergo?  How long is the academy that they attend? What kind of In-Service training do they receive in investigations, search & seizure, interview and interrogation, evidence collection & preservation, crime scene investigation, etc, etc, etc. How many are on the local SWAT team? How many are firearms qualified, how many are state certified Law Enforcement Officers (LEOs, and as a primary job, not a second job). How many are assigned to the Narcotics Unit, the Sex Crimes Unit, the Homicide Unit, the Special Investigations Unit (White Collar Crimes), the Computer Crimes Unit, the K-9 Unit, the Air Unit, the Traffic Unit?????????


Somebody appears to have an overinflated idea of what a guard/security officer is and does.  I repeat my initial point, I appreciate the job that the Security Services provide, but our jobs ARE NOT THE SAME!



"Be a yardstick of quality. Some people aren't used to an environment where excellence is expected."
Steve Jobs

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