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Elementary & High School District Police

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Jim_g

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Posted about 4 years ago

 

Is Elementary & High School District Police a good career choice?

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Rate This | Posted about 4 years ago

 

Not enough infor.  As compared to what? a career at McDonalds, a career as a BP Agent.  And remember one persons ideal career is another person hellish career.  You also have to consider co-workers and working environment, good bad, indifferent?

Jim_g

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Rate This | Posted about 4 years ago

 

My question is: how does school district policing  differ from university and, college policing?


I have noticed that there are no comments here by school district police officers; and, I would like to discuss the job they do with them as; I


am considering this career option; thank you.

White_shirt_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 4 years ago

 

What?

Nintendo_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 4 years ago

 

I'm not a LEO, but it sounds like you are asking about SROs (school resource officers).  If so, I suppose a SRO position would be a good choice for someone who enjoys law enforcement and children.  A SRO is still a certified police officer and usually they complete some time in regular patrol before they can take on this specialized assignment.


"I have a strict gun control policy. If there's a gun around, I want to be in control of it."

- Clint Eastwood

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Rate This | Posted about 4 years ago

 

gn13 says ...



I'm not a LEO, but it sounds like you are asking about SROs (school resource officers).  If so, I suppose a SRO position would be a good choice for someone who enjoys law enforcement and children.  A SRO is still a certified police officer and usually they complete some time in regular patrol before they can take on this specialized assignment.



i assumed that he was asking about police employed by the schood district, not SRO's, some HS have their own police departments, and I don't know much about those at the HS level, though I did encounter some of them at a previous job.

Nintendo_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 4 years ago

 

Casscocop says ...



gn13 says ...



I'm not a LEO, but it sounds like you are asking about SROs (school resource officers).  If so, I suppose a SRO position would be a good choice for someone who enjoys law enforcement and children.  A SRO is still a certified police officer and usually they complete some time in regular patrol before they can take on this specialized assignment.



i assumed that he was asking about police employed by the schood district, not SRO's, some HS have their own police departments, and I don't know much about those at the HS level, though I did encounter some of them at a previous job.



Sorry!  I knew I shouldn't have stepped in here!  I didn't know there were police departments at the high school level.  I have seen them at the college level, but never below.  Sorry again!


"I have a strict gun control policy. If there's a gun around, I want to be in control of it."

- Clint Eastwood

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Rate This | Posted about 4 years ago

 

gn13 says ...



Casscocop says ...



gn13 says ...



I'm not a LEO, but it sounds like you are asking about SROs (school resource officers).  If so, I suppose a SRO position would be a good choice for someone who enjoys law enforcement and children.  A SRO is still a certified police officer and usually they complete some time in regular patrol before they can take on this specialized assignment.



i assumed that he was asking about police employed by the schood district, not SRO's, some HS have their own police departments, and I don't know much about those at the HS level, though I did encounter some of them at a previous job.



Sorry!  I knew I shouldn't have stepped in here!  I didn't know there were police departments at the high school level.  I have seen them at the college level, but never below.  Sorry again!



No problem, that is why I bolded assume, I'm not sure if he is talking about HS police or SRO's just assumed the former, I have never encountered any LE at the elementary school level around here of either kind, other than  D.A.R.E. officers.

Bronzestarribbon_max50

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Rated +2 | Posted about 4 years ago

 

School Police v. University Police.  There is a slight difference as traditionally Campus Police refers to Secondary Educational Instittutions and University Police are College.  Both have state sanctioned ORI's and police powers that allow them to enforce all laws of the land as well as school code violations.


Administrative differences obviously because colleges are run by Chief / Director whom answers to the board of regents or the school administrative officer as do School Police.  Jurisdictionally is where the slight difference is.  Campus police are empowered by the state and can enforce violations on school properties and at school sanctioned events.  University Police do the same, but often depending on the jurisdiction will have additional jurisdictional responsibilities.  Its a name play and obviously saleries may differ as well.  Some powers may be limited and or enhanced according to the school administration. 


Campus is governed from a school district and office of a superintendant and University Police are not.  The other obvious difference is the clientele age.  Campus Police deal mainly with Juvenile offenders or perpetrators and University Police by enlarge deal with adults just like all other agencies.  Many University Police and Campus Police also enter into Memorandums of Understanding between city state and or county, as to jurisdiction to carry out investigations off school property.  If there is no memorandum of understanding then an officer from the affected jurisdiction must accompany the Campus or University Officer while conducting his / her investigations. 


Many PD's and SO's have SRO's embedded within the school and deal with a lot of school infractions and enforce the respective statutes and or ordinances to include School Code of Conduct.  I work for a University part time and for a Sheriff's Office full time, so I bridge the gap as it were.   Its a good choice if that is where your interest, zeal or desire is focused.  If you want more traditional police "Action" you may want to look at State, County or Municipal...

Jack_bauer_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 4 years ago

 

csiguy says ...



School Police v. University Police.  There is a slight difference as traditionally Campus Police refers to Secondary Educational Instittutions and University Police are College.  Both have state sanctioned ORI's and police powers that allow them to enforce all laws of the land as well as school code violations.


Administrative differences obviously because colleges are run by Chief / Director whom answers to the board of regents or the school administrative officer as do School Police.  Jurisdictionally is where the slight difference is.  Campus police are empowered by the state and can enforce violations on school properties and at school sanctioned events.  University Police do the same, but often depending on the jurisdiction will have additional jurisdictional responsibilities.  Its a name play and obviously saleries may differ as well.  Some powers may be limited and or enhanced according to the school administration. 


Campus is governed from a school district and office of a superintendant and University Police are not.  The other obvious difference is the clientele age.  Campus Police deal mainly with Juvenile offenders or perpetrators and University Police by enlarge deal with adults just like all other agencies.  Many University Police and Campus Police also enter into Memorandums of Understanding between city state and or county, as to jurisdiction to carry out investigations off school property.  If there is no memorandum of understanding then an officer from the affected jurisdiction must accompany the Campus or University Officer while conducting his / her investigations. 


Many PD's and SO's have SRO's embedded within the school and deal with a lot of school infractions and enforce the respective statutes and or ordinances to include School Code of Conduct.  I work for a University part time and for a Sheriff's Office full time, so I bridge the gap as it were.   Its a good choice if that is where your interest, zeal or desire is focused.  If you want more traditional police "Action" you may want to look at State, County or Municipal...



 


 

Good reply, not too much to add to this except it depends on what state you are in. The arrest powers such differ. In Texas, college officers have county wide jurisdiction in every county the college has a interest in. School district's jurisdiction is set by the school board (usually within the district). With that said, if you have an investigation or arrest that takes you out of your jurisdiction, you have peace officer authority to deal with it. 


I have worked for a city, college and now a school district.  In a way, there isn't much difference between the three in that you are appointed to an office and take the oath to uphold the law. The only difference is(and really, it's up to each individual organization) on how you uphold the law. Some school districts, much like college campus are customer service oriented, but in saying that you must realize that means you must be professional in all aspects of your job.


I had a lot more freedom in the way of arrest and citations at the city/college pd. They were not scrutinized as much as they are now. Then again, you have the potential of a superintendent, some mid level administrator, a school principle or two, and whoever else who decides to inquire about what happened thrown into the mix. A college pd may have just your supervisors, your chief, and the director looking into your actions.


College or School districts can take actions or student discipline in matters of fights, disorder, or something else minor that doesn't require the attention of the police, and they can take actions administratively without calling us. That's fine, but once we are involved, we are involved. School or College, we take action and document.


Again, each agency is different and it's kind of unfair to make an adequate response here to cover all you may want to know. Just go around to some of these agencies as a prospective hire and ask questions.

25-1-13-a_1__max50

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Rate This | Posted about 4 years ago

 

I am a police officer who works for a school district police department.  Five (5) high schools (soon to be six) of which I am an SRO assigned to one of them plus two (2) continuation high schools, nine (9) middle schools and waaaaaaaaaaay too many elementary schools to count off the top of my head.  We are the seventh largest school district in California.  While we are specialized law enforcement and deal with crimes mostly committed by juveniles, we do the same things as city cops and sheriff's deputies.  We train (and work) with both on a regular basis.  We pull traffic, work DUI and SMASH (gang) details and sweeps and also deal with crimes committed by adults on and off of our campuses and district sites.  We are often asked by the city police department and the county sheriff's department for assistance because of the database we have access to regarding the juveniles.


Here is a link to an article you may want to check out:  BTW this just happened this last week at one of our continuation high schools.


http://www.sbsun.com/ci_16318522?IADID=Search-www.sbsun.com-www.sbsun.com

Photo__1__max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 4 years ago

 

It really depends on the school and location.  Everywhere is different.  I'm a LEO for a University Police Dept and we do everything the municipal PD's do.  Our primary jurisdiction is obviously campus property and 500 yards off property.  So we have quite a bit of area to patrol.  We assist any local, state or federal LEO's off property.  The high school police don't really do anything at all.  I'm not even sure if they are fully commissioned powers of arrest and im NOT talking about Police SRO's. 

25-1-13-a_1__max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 4 years ago

 

thestugots01 says ...



It really depends on the school and location.  Everywhere is different.  I'm a LEO for a University Police Dept and we do everything the municipal PD's do.  Our primary jurisdiction is obviously campus property and 500 yards off property.  So we have quite a bit of area to patrol.  We assist any local, state or federal LEO's off property.  The high school police don't really do anything at all.  I'm not even sure if they are fully commissioned powers of arrest and im NOT talking about Police SRO's. 



I will refer to my earlier post on the topic........ I don't know what they do in PA or if the "high school police" in your state are actually a "security" department or if the officers are actually commissioned police officers working for the local jurisdiction and assigned "SRO" (School Resource Officer) duties.  Again, referring to my earlier post and as a police officer assigned SRO duties for the School District Police Department, I can assure you that I work.

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Rate This | Posted about 3 years ago

 

what can a school district police enforce? can they give me a ticket for playing music loud in my van? i ask for i dont have a nice stero in the car and its not loud like the ones people put in their car, also i have never got a a ticket for this.

25-1-13-a_1__max50

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Rate This | Posted about 3 years ago

 

wwyd says ...



what can a school district police enforce? can they give me a ticket for playing music loud in my van? i ask for i dont have a nice stero in the car and its not loud like the ones people put in their car, also i have never got a a ticket for this.



YES.......... If I can hear it, crappy radio or not, the offense is citable and I can enforce it.

25-1-13-a_1__max50

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Rate This | Posted about 3 years ago

 

SkoolCop says ...



wwyd says ...



what can a school district police enforce? can they give me a ticket for playing music loud in my van? i ask for i dont have a nice stero in the car and its not loud like the ones people put in their car, also i have never got a a ticket for this.



Interesting first post with a skeleton profile from the OP.  Odds are that the OP was just issued his / her very first citation for the very offense that he / she is asking about in his / her post.  The answer is YES.......... If I can hear it, crappy radio or not, the offense is citable and I can enforce it.


Eagle_rwb_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 3 years ago

 


SkoolCop says ...


wwyd says ...



what can a school district police enforce? can they give me a ticket for playing music loud in my van? i ask for i dont have a nice stero in the car and its not loud like the ones people put in their car, also i have never got a a ticket for this.



YES.......... If I can hear it, crappy radio or not, the offense is citable and I can enforce it.



 



I direct traffic for a school police agency and we currently have one police officer. In the heyday of the agency, there were six officers. I have accompanied him to various school-involved events all over the state. He has state-wide authority, a former sheriff's deputy. He has a take-home car, and everything else a city cop has. Even my civilian position carries special authority as an exception because in my city only police officers may direct traffic without a permit. School Police are, in my case, considered special police, primarily focusing on school property. That authority is state-wide.



For instance, school bus drivers may report a "stop-arm" violator, someone who passed a school bus loading students. It will be taken to court as long as the bus driver is present. School police can charge that person.


Texas02n_max600_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 3 years ago

 

I am currently working security full time at a local school district and as a reserve as a city police officer.  There is no police department in my district because of the size of the district (13 schools.) In my experience, its a lot more information to keep track of because you have to keep track of the relevant state Penal Code, Criminal Procedure, Education Code, Health Code and Juvenile Justice Policy and Procedure and also the district policies and procedures. There were days that were very rewarding and exciting and other days where I wanted to smack someone upside their head, but that could be said about working in a city police department also. I've been working graveyards since July and have been enjoying how much more relaxed it is. I have to say that it would be in the best interest to check with each school district before applying to see what the expect out of the officer and the department. 


"Niether fire nor wind, birth nor death can erase our good deeds." Buddha

25-1-13-a_1__max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 3 years ago

 

rypete says ...



I am currently working security full time at a local school district and as a reserve as a city police officer.  There is no police department in my district because of the size of the district (13 schools.) In my experience, its a lot more information to keep track of because you have to keep track of the relevant state Penal Code, Criminal Procedure, Education Code, Health Code and Juvenile Justice Policy and Procedure and also the district policies and procedures. There were days that were very rewarding and exciting and other days where I wanted to smack someone upside their head, but that could be said about working in a city police department also. I've been working graveyards since July and have been enjoying how much more relaxed it is. I have to say that it would be in the best interest to check with each school district before applying to see what the expect out of the officer and the department. 



Interesting in that I would think that officers or deputys working in any city or county would at some point in thier career use a statute from each of these state codes and yet I know city officers that don't even know the city municipal code (thier own code mind you) for truancy.