General Forums >> General Discussions >> Poll: Have 10-codes outlived their purpose?

+3

Poll: Have 10-codes outlived their purpose?

6,487 Views
107 Replies Flag as inappropriate

Poll: Have 10-codes outlived their purpose?

Pl_stamp_max50

313 posts

back to top

Posted about 4 years ago

 

And see how well you know your 10-codes with our newest quiz.

-191 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted about 4 years ago

 

Didn't do real good on the quiz as the 10 codes used where not the ones I had been trained on, what agencies use the 10 codes for the test, there are no standard 10 codes .

-9 posts

back to top
+1

Rated +1 | Posted about 4 years ago

 

In Montana, we are not supposed to use the 10 code system any more. We have many different branches of LE in our area (City, County, State, BIA, Border Patrol, FBI), and different codes are used. It gets confusing. It is better to use plain language, in my opinion.

-9 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted about 4 years ago

 

I just took the test too. We use a different set of 10 codes. I didn't do so well. I guess that just supports my last post. The codes are different everywhere.

-191 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted about 4 years ago

 

10 codes don't provide much security, i wouldn't  post the link again, but about 30 seconds searching in the internet will get you a list of 10 codes with various usages for each 10 code #.  about the only 10 code that i find still useful is when the dispatcher asks 10-12, which means  "are you with the subject" (that you just ran), that means you need to be alone since your subject is wanted.  We use plain speech otherwise where i work.

Avatar_wild_max50

5501 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted about 4 years ago

 

The first question on the quiz already showed me that we have a different set. I've said before that I would prefer a national standard for 10 codes versus abolishing them. I've known far too many officers that love the sound of their own voices over the radio. I think it sounds more professional.


Heroes Live Forever!

Afghanistan_151_max50

2826 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted about 4 years ago

 

10-4, we old skool it here and I say i'm 10-6 with the 10 codes!!!



Energizer Bunny arrested, charged with battery.

-77 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted about 4 years ago

 

Oddly enough, we use both. When talking to each other, and another dept. on our channel, we use plain talk, accept for 7 various codes (on station, traffic stop, warrant, clear, prisoner, intoxicated, lunch). When use our other radio to speak with the Sheriffs dept., we use a full list of tencodes.


It's very apparent that not all 10-codes are standard. When working with other agencies, it can get confusing, especialy when you don't have time to ask on the radio "whats a code ___". If you're rolling to a mutual assist, it's nice to know what you're getting into before you get there.

Evil_max50

7070 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted about 4 years ago

 

bmorgan says ...



Ther will always be a place for a FEW SIMPLE 10 codes.  For example.  On a traffic stop I can say "Please check this guy's DL and see if it is valid, also check for local and NCIC warrants, and please check if he is on probation or parole."  OR  I can say "10-31 on my subject"  


However, some places get way to complicated with codes.    



We don't do either of those here its.  'UNIT #' Check one.  Disp chks DOL, NCIC, WACIC and Local


You have the rest of your life to solve the problem, how long your life lasts depends on how well you do it. -Clint Smith

Respect it

Photo_user_banned_big

11 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted about 4 years ago

 

schultzy0004 says ...



In Montana, we are not supposed to use the 10 code system any more. We have many different branches of LE in our area (City, County, State, BIA, Border Patrol, FBI), and different codes are used. It gets confusing. It is better to use plain language, in my opinion.



Sir, in a way I agree but I am going to play devils advocate. If you have a felon standing next to you and you have dispatch running his criminal history and he comes back to having a warrant. Is the dispatcher going to say over the radio "This person has a warrant out of such and such county for drug distribution and is known to carry a weapon." ??


Just curious.

Online-photo-sharing-gallery-animal-cat-cougar-artct45_max160_max50

6130 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted about 4 years ago

 

My agency doens't use 10 codes, BUT we have our own radio system and we are not dispatched. However , we do have city and SO channels on our radios so we do learn their 10 codes. During emergencies, when GOHSEP is up and running, we have been told to use plain speak, to many different agencies involved to know what everyone uses.


PL's Mamacat

Newtcmbadge_max50

10 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted about 4 years ago

 

We (all law enforcement) are already under  a mandate to go to plain language.  There is no consistency in 10-codes as it is and the advent of scanners has all but eliminated the usefullness of 10-codes.   We need a system that all LEOs in every agency can (should) understand -- the English language -- and NO, we should not have to "press 1 for English."

0 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted about 4 years ago

 

Two items from the NIMS point of view.


Whenever an incident grows to where other jurisdictions or response disciplines become involved, there is a need for clear communications.  A few years ago there was confusion because a mistuned radio resulted in call between Virginia and Maryland State Police using a ten code that was a routine traffic stop in one state, and an officer needs assistance in the other state.  A problem with use of different ten codes also came up during the DC sniper apprehension.


Secondly, people tend to fall back on habit and routine under pressure.  In a stressful mutual aid incident , someone may fall back on their local code useage instead of using mutually agreed upon words or codes.  Practice and consistent use of plain language results in better coordination and communications.

Author_max50

6 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted about 4 years ago

 

If you read the comments, you can see why they need to be retired. I have been in a dangerous situation and panicked and became tongue-tied trying to spit out numbers for situations that I didn't normally face. Ten codes also change from region to region or agency to agency which makes it confusing to communicate with other officers in emergency situations. Add mistakes to this and it's clear why plain language is the new methodology.


Plain language is the best and easiest way to go as long as dispatchers and officers aren't long winded. The challenge is keeping the "air" open for traffic.

Mets_logo_max50

2 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted about 4 years ago

 

These "10" codes have long outlived their purpose. If there were a UNIVERSAL 10 code list, then I would agree that they still have a use.


Simplifying the calls, and using basic language would better serve the officers in the field. Less chance of missing something oe being mis understood, or confusing a number called.


 

Jpd_new_max50

1893 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted about 4 years ago

 

2 wrong.  There are some codes that are not used here in IL.  I agree that 10 code should be standardized throughout the Country.


"People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf."
George Orwell

“The supreme art of war is to subdue the enemy without fighting.”
― Sun Tzu

PL Mentoring Team Member

Mets_logo_max50

2 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted about 4 years ago

 

fate300m says ...



schultzy0004 says ...



In Montana, we are not supposed to use the 10 code system any more. We have many different branches of LE in our area (City, County, State, BIA, Border Patrol, FBI), and different codes are used. It gets confusing. It is better to use plain language, in my opinion.



Sir, in a way I agree but I am going to play devils advocate. If you have a felon standing next to you and you have dispatch running his criminal history and he comes back to having a warrant. Is the dispatcher going to say over the radio "This person has a warrant out of such and such county for drug distribution and is known to carry a weapon." ??


Just curious.



If this guy is a predicate felon, or a career criminal...You don't think they know these codes better than us? LOL


Hell, I have seen perps who are better at printing themselves than a new jack..LOL I always got a kick out of that...." here kid, let me do it, and save ya some time, and having to reprint....

Avatar_wild_max50

5501 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted about 4 years ago

 

DaveRave24 says ...



fate300m says ...



schultzy0004 says ...



In Montana, we are not supposed to use the 10 code system any more. We have many different branches of LE in our area (City, County, State, BIA, Border Patrol, FBI), and different codes are used. It gets confusing. It is better to use plain language, in my opinion.



Sir, in a way I agree but I am going to play devils advocate. If you have a felon standing next to you and you have dispatch running his criminal history and he comes back to having a warrant. Is the dispatcher going to say over the radio "This person has a warrant out of such and such county for drug distribution and is known to carry a weapon." ??


Just curious.



If this guy is a predicate felon, or a career criminal...You don't think they know these codes better than us? LOL


Hell, I have seen perps who are better at printing themselves than a new jack..LOL I always got a kick out of that...." here kid, let me do it, and save ya some time, and having to reprint....



True, but I've seen more bad guys not know specific codes then do. Most know some of the very common ones in their area. I've also seen a lot of bad guys bail when hearing about their warrant from the officer standing next to them. I've started to wear an ear piece, which alleviates part of this problem.


Heroes Live Forever!

Photo_user_blank_big

342 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted about 4 years ago

 

I agree the the ten codes are out dated.  However some will live with us forever.  10/4, 10/20. are going to be with us for quite some time.  In addition some agencies use a "code word" as a warning to the officer if they are running a license or registration at a traffic stop, and the person of interest comes back "hot".  After that the officer can request that they hold the information, until he checks his patrol vehicle.  He returns to his vehicle and gets the information, and proceeds accordingly.

Photo_user_blank_big

2 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted about 4 years ago

 

 I am not anyone special - I got all of them correct just because I watch a lot of cop shows and movies.  But I agree with a lot of the comments here - there should be a formal, national set of codes - I know that would be a pain because all the states, counties, cities, that don't use whatever code means whatever in the "new", we'll call it the "Federal" list, would have to relearn the codes.  But I'm just a civilian who happens to love law enforcement, military, what have you and would have probably been a Marine or a police officer had I not chosen a different path.  Closest I got was working for a medium and low security federal prison on the inside (a job I loved).  Anyway, that's my 2 cents worth for what that means.

Photo_user_blank_big

2 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted about 4 years ago

 

ColoradoInvestigator says ...



We (all law enforcement) are already under  a mandate to go to plain language.  There is no consistency in 10-codes as it is and the advent of scanners has all but eliminated the usefullness of 10-codes.   We need a system that all LEOs in every agency can (should) understand -- the English language -- and NO, we should not have to "press 1 for English."


 


That's all well and good - but as fate300m states - you're with someone you've pulled over and you've got him/her outside of their vehicle and the check comes back as the person has a warrant out for his/her arrest for murder, rape, major drug dealer, etc, etc, where you know that means the person could very well be armed and dangerous and you want the dispatcher or whomever has done your check to say that out loud?  Not if the perp can hear.  BUT, upon thinking about it as I was typing this, you could have your radio hooked to an earbud that only you can hear and that would make it ok to speak in English without codes.  Course, now I'm retracting myself because upon thinking further, if they are, say, a drug dealer, chances are good that they know the "important" 10 codes and would understand they'd been caught anyway.  So, I guess using the earbud would probably be the best idea to help keep it simple and keep the officer safe.


Photo_user_blank_big

2 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted about 4 years ago

 

We do not use 10-codes. Actually, many departments that do use 10-codes do not follow any particular guidelines. What you hear in one part of the state will not necessarily be what is used in a different agency. It leads to great confusion. I think clear language is the best was to communicate so that all listening agencies will be able to understand what you are meaning without guessing.

Photo_user_blank_big

13 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted about 4 years ago

 

We use 10-codes. half the times the new guy hasn't taken the time to learn them and they are useless. other times, Like when i am in a situation and they ask for 10-49 (information on the sitaution) I can give a code and back up is there without tipping off the person i am fae to face with.

Photo_user_blank_big

2 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted about 4 years ago

 

bmorgan says ...



Ther will always be a place for a FEW SIMPLE 10 codes.  For example.  On a traffic stop I can say "Please check this guy's DL and see if it is valid, also check for local and NCIC warrants, and please check if he is on probation or parole."  OR  I can say "10-31 on my subject"  


However, some places get way to complicated with codes.    


You can also make a procedure, here we say "Dispatch (callsign) Traffic, Location, Plate" Dispatcher runs plate and gives complete return. make approach, "Dispatch (call sign) State DL, Name/DOB" Dispatcher runs out party and gives complete return. Minimal radio traffic from the patrol.

Photo_user_blank_big

2 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted about 4 years ago

 

fate300m says ...



schultzy0004 says ...



In Montana, we are not supposed to use the 10 code system any more. We have many different branches of LE in our area (City, County, State, BIA, Border Patrol, FBI), and different codes are used. It gets confusing. It is better to use plain language, in my opinion.



Sir, in a way I agree but I am going to play devils advocate. If you have a felon standing next to you and you have dispatch running his criminal history and he comes back to having a warrant. Is the dispatcher going to say over the radio "This person has a warrant out of such and such county for drug distribution and is known to carry a weapon." ??


Just curious.



And to confrim your devils advocasy, there is a way to make sure that a unit is clear for that information without 10 codes... Thats where Department Standards come in. Your right there is no way to completly get rid of "Cop Lingo" becuase we have to protect ourselves.  Or you can make a standard that all patrols wear ear pieces its safer for the unit on scene either way.

Photo_user_blank_big

1 post

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted about 4 years ago

 

I agree about standard 10codes......They are helpful to be brief and say very little but get your situation across. Standard cross -country 10 Codes would be best!!

-1 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted about 4 years ago

 

I don't understand the purpose of the 10 codes anymore. They were widely used so that thoes people listening to the radio traffic on the scanners would have no clue what was going on. However now you can get the 10 codes for any department off the internet. So what is the point of the 10 codes any more?

0723081014c_max50

1 post

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted about 4 years ago

 

Altough there are a few 10 codes that are still useful, the majority of them we don't need.  The federal government does not use 10 codes except for maybe three.  Smaller towns do still use them for everything.

Christmas_picture_1_max50

1 post

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted about 4 years ago

 

 


<!--Session data-->
 

10-codes have their purpose, but there needs to be a more uniform 10-code language. Codes vary too much from dept. to dept. even PD vs SO.

Photo_user_blank_big

7 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted about 4 years ago

 

The ten codes are significantly useful to conceal coded conversation between dispatch, for the purpose of running data information thru NCIC, CLETS and other systems without the offender knowing what is being checked or the results received. If you the officer, use plain language in the presence of the offender, they will know what you are asking and also the results. You want the tactical advantage on your side FIRST! Example of what not to do;


Officer conducting pat down or detaining for investigation:


Unit 50 to dispatch - Request a wants and warrants check on Mr John Doe.


Dispatch to Unit 50 - Your request revealed multistate felony warrants for murder and assault on a peace officer.


What do you think the avaerage peace officer killer is going to do at the moment they hear that bit of good news? What do you think is going thru the officer's mind at that moment?


Lets take this using the ten codes:


Unit 50 to dispatch - request 10-29 on Mr John Doe, DOB, other descriptors.


Dispatch to Unit 50 - Confirm 10-29 return x4. Go 10-26 (California 10-15) for 10-99. 10-12, Unit 51 - 10-23 five mikes.


The successful results acheived thru computer checks should never be known by the offender until you have complete control of hid environment and available backup present to prevent or deter an unsafe reaction, that would compromise officer or investigator safety.

Next Page >