Law Enforcement Specialties >> Corrections, Probation & Parole >> PREFERENTIAL TREATMENT OF AN INMATE

Rate

PREFERENTIAL TREATMENT OF AN INMATE

586 Views
11 Replies Flag as inappropriate
Lol_sun_in_clouds_02_max50

17 posts

back to top

Posted over 4 years ago

 

Alright Brothers and Sisters;


Ethical question/situation for you. 


About 20 minutes ago I had a new admit, escorted by a Lieutenant and a Corporal, brought to me in the SHU. I was given a readers digest sit rep by the LT that immediately lowered my A$$hole level a notch. The new guy was brought in on a low level misdemeanor (tresspassing) but he suffers from severe PTSD ( Post Traumatic Stress Disorder). Also he is a recent veteran Iraqi/Afghan war, purple heart recipient. This all hit close to home for me because I have a few friends that have come back different after completing tours of duty in one or both theaters, I have friends who just deployed out this month, and a couple more awaitng orders to do so. Normally the inmates under my watch know that they have a better chance pissing an escape hole through the steel door than getting any special treatment or consideration from me. But watching this new guy (with no criminal history by the way) just about jump out of his skin and under the bunk whenever a loud noise occoured, made me think about what I could do to maybe take it easy on him during his hopefully brief stay. Anybody else feel that we should have special protocols for this type of situation. And what have you done or think you would do in this situation?


Don't get your knickers in a knot. Nothing is solved and it just makes you walk funny. ~Kathryn Carpenter

Just be ordinary and nothing special. Eat your food, move your bowels, pass water, and when you're tired, go and lie down. The ignorant will laugh at me, but the wise will understand. ~Bruce Lee

Don't compromise yourself. You're all you've got. ~Janis Joplin

People sleep peaceably i

Online-photo-sharing-gallery-animal-cat-cougar-artct45_max160_max50

6164 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted over 4 years ago

 

I am NOT a correctional officer but a Probation/Parole Agent. I have supervised several Viet Nam vets (my age group by the way) who have gotten sideways with the law due to PTSD. I always handled them differently than other cases. Remember, my caseload is always convicted felons  so my vets usually had alcohol and/or drug issues not to mention anger management issues. I don't see a problem in dealing with an offender in a humane way. If your guy is coming out of his skin for a loud noise and he's one of our damaged heroes, do what is necessary to let him know he's safe and then make sure he is ! I've spent lots of time with cases just talking about what happened and how it led them to us. You can't fix this guy, only years of hard work with a really good shrink is going to do that, but you can make the time he has to stay in your facility bearable. Oh, and I don't consider it "preferential treatment". If this guy is trained in hand to hand ( and you know he is) you could be setting him up for additional charges if he feels he has to "protect "himself. Not to mention do you really want to have to get in a physical altercation with him?


PL's Mamacat

Picture_204_max50

184 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted over 4 years ago

 

agree w/ CAT D.


i was a corrections officer and every now and again you got an inmate that was unstable. ( i know - hard to believe) . his situation seems harder and by no means because there is no criminal history doesnt mean this isnt the start of something really bad. it could be PTSD or there may be some drug use in the past.


a lot of times , there may be mental issues compounded with the PTSD. prison is not a place for the mentally ill. there needs to be a seperate facility for them where they can get "treatment".

Jennsuit_max50

1 post

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted over 4 years ago

 

I think that every inmate is different and in addition to the many situations you encounter, you should handle them as such.  Some have special needs, whether they are a behavior management issue or mentally deficient.  In my experience, I have learned that as an LEO, you have to be many different things (i.e counselor, teacher, disciplinarian, role model, etc.)  When I first started I was somewhat put off by those that I did not understand.  As I have gained more experience, I have learned more about different types of people and different types of disorders and mental illnesses out there.  I enjoy working with these people.  I think it takes a special group of people to communicate efficiently with these folks and definitely a lot of patience.  As with the man you were talking about suffering from PTSD, I don't believe it's preferential treatment to act differently with him.  You can still be fair but firm.  The approach is what makes the difference in my eyes.

Batman_max600_1__max50

3454 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted over 4 years ago

 

It is ok to treat them differently. We just had a man that we arrested who had served 5 deployments in Iraq. I informed him that I had the great respect for him for serving your Country. He was respectful and easy to handle. He also suffered from PTSD and alcoholism. He is getting the help he needs and I feel that he will heal and become the man his wife knows he can be. He did something stupid when intoxicated (image that). Good man made bad decisions. I don't mind helping them out when they need it and deserve it.  


Bad stuff happens to good people, handle it and overcome.
My motto for life:
Let go and let GOD,
Only HE can control everything.

Don_27t_20tred_20on_20me_max50

1252 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted over 4 years ago

 

You should always treat individuals with mental dissorders differently than you would a normal person....it's not preferential treatment by any means.


If someone had turrets would you spray him everytime he screamed at you? Just imagine it this way, if he didn't know English, would you expect him to understand everything you say?


I'm not saying to bring cigarettes in for the guy, I'm saying that sometimes you just got to take a different approach on how you talk to and deal with people with dissabilities and differences other than the norm.


And before anyone jumps down my throat about how I just said that PTSD guys aren't normal and have mental dissorders, realize that anyone that suffers trauma has some sort of risidual effect from it. If you got into a traffic accident at a 4-way stop sign, wouldn't you pay special attention to every 4-way stop sign? Would you not have the memory of that accident everytime you went down that intersection or one like it? Some people have it worse than others and some people deal with their trauma differently....some people get drunk and beat their wives, some find a hobby or a career that lets them "get away from it all" and others just bottle it up inside until it comes out unexpectedly.


¡GØÐ HņH ÑØ ƒÜR¥ †HÂÑ À Pϧ§ËР؃ƒ PÁRņRØØPËR!

Ríø†!™

Heart_max50

1243 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted over 4 years ago

 

There is a big difference between offering extended professional respect than preferencial treatment.  That is an unfortunate situation and is very hard to pin down a solid answer, but this is not about what I or any other corrections officer thinks.  This is about how you feel about it.  Good luck!


Above all, we must realize that no arsenal, or no weapon in the arsenals of the world, is so formidable as the will and moral courage of free men and women. It is a weapon our adversaries in today’s world do not have.

Ronald Reagan

Chris_and_i_in_uniform_max50

568 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted over 4 years ago

 

I don't see a problem with it.


NEVER GIVE UP, NEVER GIVE IN, AND ALWAYS FIGHT!!!!!!!!!!!!PL Mentoring Team Member

-165 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted over 4 years ago

 

I've been a shift Sergeant for more than 4 years now and on the job for nearly 10 years. I have always treated everyone with respect and have treated each person in my facility on a case by case basis. Everyone is different, inmates included, and I think any good officer would have acted as you did. in your scenario.

Image_max50

493 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted over 4 years ago

 

Once in a while we get a situation like this. Being the only Booking Officer, when I am slammed, I try and weed the inmates out of holding based on their circumstances, charges, illness or whatever. You have to make an informed decision. Just because we're C.O.'s doesn't mean we're not human. Sometimes you have to put yourself in their shoes, so to speak.


BroncoGator Logo

Img00074_max50

390 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted about 4 years ago

 

Preferential treatment- no! Hell no never!


Being human, understanding and doing your job, yes.


We are no longer titled, Jail or Prison Guard and many of us feel offended when we are called such. Most of us are now titled Correctional Officer and we are employed by a Department of Corrections or a system where the one of the main goals in addition to public safety is rehabilitation. If we demand society calls us Correctional Officers then we must perform our duties as such and part of that is to correct an inmates behavior. Correcting behavior goes beyond write ups and discipline but finding an inmate help. Does that make us soft- not at all, it makes us human. It also affords us the opportunity to provide public safety because correcting an inmates behavior makes them less likely to re-offend and they will give you less problems while in custody.


The trick is that you have to maintain a balance. Just because John has mental issues does not mean you don't write him a shot for doing the same thing as Joe who doesn't have a mental issue. It means that after your shot you refer John to someone who can help him. It means that if John feels he can talk to you, you listen and follow up on him. That my friends is not preferntial treatment- it's professionalism.


The above comments are soley those of the poster and in no way reflect the position of the Department of Corrections.