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Reserve/Auxiliary Officers

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Me_lookin_cute_max50

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Posted over 7 years ago

 

I would like to know if anyone is a Reserve/Auxiliary Officer and how is the training in their state. Thanks everyone.

Fleu_dis_lis_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

I am a reserve officer for a Sheriff's dept. in Louisiana. The training we go through is exactly the same as the fulltime officers go through. The only difference is we don't get paid. We get all the same training, all the same arrest powers, and all the same responsibilities. Most of us would do it for a living if it paid better.

063_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

God Bless our Reserves/Auxiliaries. You hit it on the head watercop9901. Same training, same powers, no pay. You have got to be one committed person, and truly want to "give back" to the community. I do it by being a member of the volunteer fire dept. We do the same. All for no pay. However, I've never lived in a town with a paid dept, so I don't know any different. I do know that reserves/auxiliaries are putting their lives on the moreso than I am. If I feel unsafe, I can back out. You don't have that option. Thank You for what you do, and you as well NycAux.

Fleu_dis_lis_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

Well thank you jims4, but actually most of the reserves I know never think about the "giving back to the community aspect". We do it because we love it but can't afford to live on the pay. I say can't afford it, but what I really mean is that most of us had already commited to a particular lifestyle and didn't want to give it up. The brotherhood also becomes addicting. Police are a special breed of people, a family. Once you're part of the family you don't just leave. I have been a reserve for 17 years and wouldn't know what to do with myself if I wasn't. Some of us have been around longer then most of the fulltime deputies, and I think that they respect us for that.

Me_lookin_cute_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

Thank you so much jims4 and watercop9901 for your feedback. Watercop9901 you are right when you say some can not live on the pay of the regular police officers. I been an auxiliary for almost three years now and I love helping people. I love participating in events and all other activities.

Photo_user_blank_big

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

Hi All, I started as a Reserve Deputy more years ago than I care to admit. We had to buy our own uniforms, equipment and weapon. To boot, the unit was very strict and you bought what the command told you to wear. At that time I didn't have a lot of money (still don't Ha Ha!) and was working 2 jobs, but I did it. Back then-now I'm dating myself-there was no mandatory training for police officers. Most larger depts had their own academy or would send selected candiates to the state police academy. In our case, we went to a 100 hr course plus firearms qualification. We went one or two evenings every week. Believe me, when I graduated and was allowed to wear the badge and uniform, I was proud as heck! We worked various details in the county like fairs, parades, security at church bingos, bicycle safety fairs etc. There were certain paid details where you teamed up with a ful time deputy, or other events where the sheriff specifically ordered reserve deputies out. Then you were paid hourly the same as a regular deputy. As far as authority, we had the same as a regular deputy but only when you were on a detail. Our poatches and badges were the same as the regulars except for the work Reserve on a panel on the star. I learned a lot on that job, made a number of friends on the unit and had a heck of a good time. I'm glad I joined. I feel that was the first step in my law enfocement career and I'm the better for it.

063_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

And I forgot to mention one thing about NYPD's Auxiliaries. They dress in the same uniform as the paid officers, do most of the same things the regulars do, have patrol cars, walk beats (scary) and everything else they do, WITHOUT A SIDEARM. That is real commitment.

Fleu_dis_lis_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

That IS commitment. I don't know if I could do that, not carry a side arm that is. I grew up in Schenectady and remember it being almost impossible for a private citizen to get a handgun permit. When I moved to La everyone had a gun. It was a little weird at first, standing line at the grocery store and having a lady dump her purse out on the belt and have her pistol roll out and no one gave it a second glance. If it still the same up there, maybe it's not so bad. But as we all know, the criminals are the first ones to have guns, especially when they're illegal. Was that what you were looking for NYcAux?

0701071541_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

i'm nypd auxiliary.. been one for a little over a year.. the training is about 3 months i think.. 3 hours a week.. and we study some law and limited defensive tactics and baton training.. but dont' really get to use it that much.. i have only had one time where i was about to cuff the perp.. and twice when i joined reg officers in a chase.. it's not really a physical job.. but i love it


Do what you love, Love what you do

1979_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

Been a very long time since I was. In San Diego we went through a police academy that was abbreviated from the regulars but still received maybe 3/4th the training including becoming EMT's as that was required. I worked usually around 30+ hours a week or more depending on my military schedule. I had a military commitment so naturally it had to be reserves. No pay but they did supply the badge. LOL We bought everything else including the firearm. We were not allowed to CCW, (we did anyway), and only had arrest powers while working. While working I was looked upon by the regulars as a regular cop simply because I worked so many hours and proved myself to them.

1979_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

IN G'Ville they started the reserves when I was there and we put them through a police school at the training center we had and then they were placed with a regular officer who had experience. The only ones that were ever allowed on there own were the supervisors. The reserves also were State Constables for awhile which technically gave them more powers than we had! That ended up changing when they it was determined you could not hold two sworn offices at once. I am not sure what the status of them is right now. Most of the reserves were damn good people and I enjoyed them and they were a great asset. Of course you had a few that were idiots but we got rid of them quickly.

Me_lookin_cute_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

I do it to help the community and to see what it was like out there since I am considering a career in law enforcement. I been doing this for 2yrs. Once I had to use my cuffs and that was in the presence of a regular police officer. I only cuffed the guy because the officer did not speak spanish. When I tried to talk to the guy he was very violent. He had just assaulted someone and they were asking him questions. In the command I am in there is not too many spanish speaking officers working the 4-12 tour.

Blank2_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

I've alway wondered how the auxiliary police in NYC works . I know you wear different badges and different patches but what are your powers? Do you carry firearms? I not breaking balls I really am curious.

Blank2_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

Sorry, missed Kciampa's post. 10-22

Training-3-20-07_015_002_0001_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

I'm full-time LE now and have been for the past fourteen years but I started out as a reserve police officer in the San Francisco Bay Area. I was still in the Marine Corps at the time and couldn't go full-time until I got out. When I went through the Academy, the training was just short of what was required for a full-time officer. The agency I worked for did that specifically because people were graduating their academy and then going out and getting full-time jobs with other departments and not having to spend the money necessary to put themselves through an academy. The state now divides reserves up into levels. If you want to be a level 1 (the top level), you have to go through a full academy.

Picture_156_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

Every state and every agency is different. For instance, I work for a small municipal agency outside of Portland, Oregon. I'm fully sworn, have powers of arrest, am a "solo" reserve (meaning I operate my own patrol car, make my own stops and take calls if necessary), am unpaid, and have the same rights and responsibilities as the full time officers. If you go 15 miles up the highway to the next city, they also have reserves, but they're neither sworn nor are they allowed "solo" status. In the next county over, their reserves are fully sworn and have powers of arrest, but they don't have solo status; however, one of the major cities in that county has reserves that are sworn, have powers of arrest, can achieve solo status and get paid for certain events. In the State of Oregon, reserves go through an academy put on by a local Sheriff's Office. The academy I went through was 6 months long for a total of 336 hours: every Tuesday and Thursday night for 4 hours and every Saturday for 8 hours. Our academy covered every thing from firearms (pistol qualifications), criminal law, search and seizure, EVOC (emergency vehicle operations), defensive tactics, RADAR/LIDAR, traffic stops, building searches, and con-sim (contact simulations - my favorite part). In addition to my initial training, my agency has firearms qualifications every 4 months and defensive tactics once a year. I also try to attend as much outside training as possible and I try to work a minimum of 1 shift per week to keep my skills up.