Law Enforcement Specialties >> Special Units (K9, SWAT, etc.) >> K-9 Retirement, When to Retire?

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K-9 Retirement, When to Retire?

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100_2704_max50

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Posted over 4 years ago

 

 


Ok Guys and Gals, I need your help. I have a 7 1/2 year Mal who has been on the streets for 6 years now. At the end of our shift he is exhausted. He gets home and lies around, does not even eat or drink until several hours after being home. My Mal has an affliction, He stresses out hard core when in the unit. From the time he loads up until we get home he is wound up drooling to an extreme excess, panting heavy, barking and spinning. They tried him on Doggy downers but naturally it killed his drive, same thing with Dramamine. He also has arthritis now. With this being said  I am pushing to get him retired and my Lt. has told me to put together an info packet listing a Nat’l avg for k-9 retirement age. So if you all could help me out within your own departments by finding out at what ages your past k-9 have been retired, that would be a great help. 
Thanks,
Cpl. Robert Payne
Wise County S.O. K-9 
 

Th_germanshepard_max50

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Rated +1 | Posted over 4 years ago

 

I manage a 45 dog law enforcement unit. Our retirement is not age related, but tied strictly to the dog's ability to perform. Having said that however, I can tell you the average age of a single purpose detector, generally Labrador Retrievers is 9.5. With GSD's, Mals and Dutchies, it's around 8 years old. I"ve have GSD's work until they were 10, but that is extremely rare. Unless they've change, the Military programs dogs for replacement at 8. However, dogs are still retired based on their ability to maintain proficiency, not age.


 


 


Beyond fatigue lies compensatory hypertrophy

100_2704_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 4 years ago

 

 


Yeah, I know that retirement is based on performance/proficiency and I feel that is where we are at. With that being said, the brass still needs the stats and a general #. It seems that 8 years old is a pretty popular avg. Thanks for the Intel!
 

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Rate This | Posted over 4 years ago

 

CBP used to be 9.


This was based on training 200 dogs a year and you can figure out how many dogs ( # @ 9 yrs old mandatory retirement) as a mangement figure. I would know I would have to replace XX # of 9 yr olds every year. Works great for that purpose.


Now they're trying to stretch it further based on the dog. (yeah, a $$ saving idea). Seriously, dogs with that workload need to go at 9.


IMHO that at 9 they should go.  The dog has earned it.


But that based on performance and reliability they could go earlier.


 


 

100_2704_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 4 years ago

 

Sounds good, appreciate the response.

Th_avatar_max50

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Rated +1 | Posted over 4 years ago

 

 We work em for 5 years. Very rarely do we go beyond that.  You can figure age from there.

Desk_top_pics-37_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 4 years ago

 

I've been a handler or San Diego sheriff for nearly 11 years; I am on my third dog.  All of are dogs are looked at really hard once they turn eight.  We do not have a mandatory retirement age.  It all depends on the dog and the handler.  Once the handler tells the coordinator they think it is time, and then we start looking for the replacement


 


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