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K9 Self-Training

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Posted almost 5 years ago

 

Hello everyone, i started a post already but cannot access it because i'm not a certified police officer yet, but if anyone could help me with some tips on training my new german shepherd puppy the right way, i would greatly appreciate it. thank you

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Rated +1 | Posted almost 5 years ago

 

Starters....basic training 101 now.  Sit, stay, come, down, and you can start on some focusing training.  Excercise is a must too.  How old is your puppy? If he/she is really young you will want to hold the training sessions, note the word sessions, to just little 5 minute drills (or less) several times a day.  Young pups pretty much all have ADD, they can't do 1/2 hour training sessions yet.  Make it fun!  The more fun they have the more they learn and the faster they learn it.  If you want some specifics you can enroll in a class at some place like Petsmart or Petco that can teach the basics on up or if you want I can send you a few things if you wish to p.m. me. (warning....it'll be a long reply...I believe in details.. which is why I don't take up an entire message board with specifics...btdt...LOL!) 


Do you plan to do K9 work with this pup?  That would entail a longer, more extensive, and much more detailed training and would also determine what you would be teaching them now.  For instance I usually remind people that dogs don't speak your language, they read your body language first, which is why I train most of my home "pet people" to do hand signals for just about everything.  A dog sees a particular gesture and he'll know that he's to sit, regardless of how far away you are to him.  A whisle and a point to the right means go this way to sniff for something.  Etc. However you don't really want to be teaching them that type of training if it's going to be a K9, otherwise the dog could become really confused if the bad guy somehow signals to it to sit while you've released it for a takedown.  Bad deal all the way around except for the bad guy.


Good luck with your puppy, remember patience, patience, patience.  And training every day.  I have two dogs right now and we still do 3-5 minute sessions every day.  It may be something a simple as a sit/stay at the door while I walk in and out for groceries as compared to me allowing them to "help".  We also walk every day, if the weather is crappy out, like now, we hop on a treadmill.  Basic training and excercise and you'll have a good pup, little to no training and little excercise and you're going to have problem child on your hands that could end up costing you big if it bites or tears stuff up.  It's entirely up to you what kind of dog you want, you put in the effort now and it pays you back 20 fold later on.

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Rate This | Posted almost 5 years ago

 

 


A Police Dogs Prayer
Author - Unknown
 
Oh almighty God,

whose great power and eternal

wisdom embraces the universe,

watch over my handler while I sleep.

Protect my handler from harm

while I am unable to do so.

I pray, help keep our streets and homes

safe while my handler and I rest.

I ask for your loving care because

my handler's duty is dangerous.

Grant my handler your unending strength

and courage in our daily assignments.

Dear God,

protect my brave handler,

grant your almighty protection,

unite my handler safely with the family

after the tour of duty has ended.

I ask nothing for myself.

Amen.

11-23-2006-10_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 5 years ago

 

I agree to keep the sessions short but frequent..my 12 year old shepherd had add his whole life LOL...hand signals are great.  Both my dogs are trained voice and hand. 


I will disagree with one thing you said, dogs do understand language, maybe not sentences, but they do learn words.  Example, most if not all police K9's commands are in german or other langage other than english for the obvious reasons.    My mix breed understands get or where's your brother (the shepherd), knows each toy by name and there has to be at least 50 or more toys, difference between treat and food.   Yes tone of voice and body movement has someting to do with it but there is a difference between babble ball and mitten. :)


retrever says ...



Starters....basic training 101 now.  Sit, stay, come, down, and you can start on some focusing training.  Excercise is a must too.  How old is your puppy? If he/she is really young you will want to hold the training sessions, note the word sessions, to just little 5 minute drills (or less) several times a day.  Young pups pretty much all have ADD, they can't do 1/2 hour training sessions yet.  Make it fun!  The more fun they have the more they learn and the faster they learn it.  If you want some specifics you can enroll in a class at some place like Petsmart or Petco that can teach the basics on up or if you want I can send you a few things if you wish to p.m. me. (warning....it'll be a long reply...I believe in details.. which is why I don't take up an entire message board with specifics...btdt...LOL!) 


Do you plan to do K9 work with this pup?  That would entail a longer, more extensive, and much more detailed training and would also determine what you would be teaching them now.  For instance I usually remind people that dogs don't speak your language, they read your body language first, which is why I train most of my home "pet people" to do hand signals for just about everything.  A dog sees a particular gesture and he'll know that he's to sit, regardless of how far away you are to him.  A whisle and a point to the right means go this way to sniff for something.  Etc. However you don't really want to be teaching them that type of training if it's going to be a K9, otherwise the dog could become really confused if the bad guy somehow signals to it to sit while you've released it for a takedown.  Bad deal all the way around except for the bad guy.


Good luck with your puppy, remember patience, patience, patience.  And training every day.  I have two dogs right now and we still do 3-5 minute sessions every day.  It may be something a simple as a sit/stay at the door while I walk in and out for groceries as compared to me allowing them to "help".  We also walk every day, if the weather is crappy out, like now, we hop on a treadmill.  Basic training and excercise and you'll have a good pup, little to no training and little excercise and you're going to have problem child on your hands that could end up costing you big if it bites or tears stuff up.  It's entirely up to you what kind of dog you want, you put in the effort now and it pays you back 20 fold later on.


Th_germanshepard_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 5 years ago

 

The best thing you can do for a puppy is to socialize it and let it be a puppy. If it hits the chewing stage, redirect that behavior to something the dog is allowed to chew on. Like a favorite toy. Let the puppy see the world, different floor surfaces, meet people etc. The more he sees as he grows up, the less chance he'll be afraid of something when  he gets older. I wouldn't worry about a lot of commands other than a good recall, maybe sit and stay. It doesn't matter what language you train the dog in. Dogs learn to associate sound wth a specific behavior, they really don't know "words" per se. Law Enforcement K9, in my opinion is the best thing going. First though, you have to become a law enforcement officer. Do good in school, get you education, join a department when you are ready. Get that out of the way first.


Beyond fatigue lies compensatory hypertrophy