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Is rank just a matter of experience?

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Irresponsibility_max50

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Posted about 7 years ago

 

In the AF, the primary difference between officers and enlisted was a college degree. In many PDs that I've checked into, a 4-year degree is a prerequisite to employment, so what qualifies a person for advancement in the chain of command (Chief, Commissioner, etc)...are those elected officials who used to cops, or...I know many dept.s differ in their exact structure, but the general chain is pretty standard. What are the chances that today's rookie can advance to tomorrow's police chief?

Nag_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

When I was an intern at the PD, this is what a sergant, and LT both told me, "you have to start at the bottom and work your way up." Meaning you have to be a officer/ deputy and then after you put in your time ( years) move up to the next level and so on. Generally in a large department you will have more opportiny to advance, more openings, compared to a smaller department. Also, I'm not an officer yet, but I did make it to the second phase for a federal law enforcement position, so i'm almost there. :)

001_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

Promotion is based upon a number of factors. The first one is the desire for an officer to promote. Without that, the officer will likely stay an officer. After a certain amount of experience is gained, promotional exams are given for the rank structure to tests a candidates knowledge and ability in areas of the next rank and leadership. After the selection process is complete a list is compiled ranking the promotional candidates and the open positions are filled from there. Each department is different but there are some politics involved in it as well.

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

That's a good synopisis BCPS.

I would add that as an officer, corporal, sergeant, etc. - to take every opportunity that comes your way. It can be additional training opportunities, or temporary assignments, or even PR work, but the key is to gather a large breadth of experience to apply at your next position. Don't do it just to spotlight yourself, but do it out of personal or professional interest.

Also, as BCPS hinted at, with PD's it might be a good idea to explore what route your department heads and higher-ups took to achieve their positions - it's not uncommon to find a fastrack in a certain department, assigment, or division. Less so with Counties, due to the hierarchy changing every 4 years, BUT there's definately a different kind of system in place at SD's.

Th_plugman1_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

Each officer has to decide how much responisiblity they want as they go through their career. I for one always want to push myself to the next level. I can say even as a sargeant, I am always learning, so just because you get promoted to lieutenant or chief, you are still learning. Once you think you have learned everything you need to know in this job that is a sign to get out. I guess expereance is one thing when getting promoted, but there are a lot of other issues a LEO has to want to get to that position.

1979_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

One needs to have the drive to advance. I knew some that simply did not want to take the exam because they were happy being patrolmen. You also need to try and gain as much experience as possible in every area from patrol to investigations, vice, traffic, and whatever else your department offers. Gaining outside education as well as learning and accepting City, County, State, or Federal training is also a plus. You then take the test to advance when you have the time in and go before the panel for your oral. You simply answer honestly and explain why you think you should become a leader with this rank. It is easier to advance in a larger dept because there is less politics and more opportunities. I worked in a small Southern town and was one of the very few that was not born and raised in the area so yes, politics does play a large role. The Chief at that time called me the Calif. boy simply because I lived in Ca while stationed there for the US Navy! No chance of getting promoted with him. Later chiefs opened up to performance rather than the 'good ol' boy' system but I was retired by then.

Cpd_star_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

Hahaha. There are ome idiot bosses out there.

367926427_m_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

I like the bosses that get on the job as a patrolman, get and inside job, study while on duty, get promoted and come on the street and tell you what the text book said. "No shit asshole in the text book there was one car with a load of gang bangers...they never said what to do when the other one blocked in my patrol car". Apparently improvise isn't in the text book but I'll get back to ya...I'm taking the next exam. But this Ahole will still be one step ahead of me for now.

Fleu_dis_lis_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

BCPS hit it on the head as far as the way my dept. works. Be careful what you wish for though, because you might get it. I have been promoted several times and am now in a position where I can't work all the areas I would like because I must keep myself available for situations that may need a supervisor there. I used to ride horses on patrol or patrol the water in a boat, but now they want me in a unit available to go where ever I am needed at a moments notice. That is not what I like to do. Not to mention the butt chewings for something someone under you did that was stupid or foolish. Some times I wish I could just go back to getting out there and getting in the thick of things and then writting my report and going 10-7.

367926427_m_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

Watercop my post wasn't directed at someone like you. You have some time/experience. What I meant was a guy goes from the academy to the "inside inside" crime analysis unit and sits all day studying. I've been on 7 years, him 13, he couldn't cuff a suspect correctly because he hasn't done it in so long....(No BS)

Fleu_dis_lis_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

I didn't take it personally. I know each dept. has their own "special people". We have them too, and everone knows who they are. Lucky we have policies in place that prevent things like that from happening most of the time. But because it's a paramilitary structure and not a democracy, the top dog has the power to do what he wants. But that very rarely happens in our dept. I wouldn't feel comfortable not knowing each level of the ranks and being responsible for them.