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Prison Reform

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Thomaslennon_reno911_240_max50

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Posted over 7 years ago

 

What is everyone's stance about prison reform? Some say that prisons are overcrowded and are a bastion of dehumanization. On the flip side, isn't it better to have criminals off the street?

3734983337_1__max50

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

i believe the prison being overcrowded issue has been proven many times over.

Th_plugman1_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

I wish we could just execute the ones on death row instead of giving them years and years of appeals. That would take care of some of the overcrowding. I think sex offenders need to fall on the same path as death row inmates, just get rid of them or put them in general population and let them take their chances. I think that would also get rid of some overcrowding. I don't believe in reform for many inmates. It's ironic that everyone wants us to pamper these people. They are there because they put themselves there. They chose to do what the did so they need to stop bitchen.

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

With tougher laws and stricter sentences, aren't we obligated to put them somewhere (after the initial arrest, screening by probation, recommendation to the court, the court/plea process)?

Inmates don't just check into prison's. There is a complete front end and middle in the criminal justice system they must exhaust before being remanded to the custody of the state.

So if we agree, punishment is being segregated from society for a duration of time (vs. corporal punishment, etc.), then isn't the prison system doing their job by accepting them, and releasing them back into society after their commitment (which was imposed by the courts) is completed.

Or is Corrections tasked with somehow "rehabilitating" an offender? I don't think we're talking about volunteers here...

English_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

I have a great idea for overcrowded prisions. You go with the 3 strikes and your out rule, and instead of letting them rot in prision, put them in a shark tank. Problem Solved ;)

1039971279_m_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

Prison should be for punishment, not rehab. If you can't obey our laws, you don't deserve your rights. When you infringe upon some one else's rights, you shouldn't get your own. There is no such thing as rehab. There are some people who learn from their mistakes, and will actually come out of prison and make a good life, but, LOOK AT RECIDIVISM statistics. They're awful. Especially for violent crimes. When someone broke gets out of prison and is on parole, I guarantee you they're not making 6 digits working at Chrysler or Plante and Moran. They're going to be broke, its going to be impossible to find decent employment, which is likely going to resort them back to a criminal lifestyle. Im not saying everyone, but, in criminal justice, you can't look at the exception, you have to look at the majority. Let these A-HOLES ROT IN PRISON WITHOUT TV, WEIGHTS, POTTERY CLASS, etc. Work them to death.

9-11-logo_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

Back in the late 70's or early 80's, I ran into a program called "Inside Out" in NYC, where volunteers were paired up with inmates who were soon to be released. The volunteers were trained to work with prisoners on the specifics of such things as, how are you going to support yourself, where will you find clothing for a job interview, where are you going to live, how are you going to avoid your "previous associates". The recidivism rate for those who participated in this program was hugely improved. I have no idea if it is still going on, as I haven't lived in that area since 1981.

Of course, that took a lot of volunteer time and effort, and you wonder if you couldn't avoid some of those people turning to crime in the first place by applying that same effort to "at-risk" youth BEFORE they commit the crimes. And there are people who do just that.

One thing I've noticed over the years, some people feel called to work with one population while others feel called to work with a different one. Some people really want to work with prisoners, while others are repelled by the idea. If we worked on all fronts, following our interest, we would each be able to do our little part to improve the whole situation.

B27_1__max50

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

I started out typing a long response to this but found myself preaching so I decided to keep it simple.
1. Yes over crowding is a problem; it feeds every other negative issue in jails like staff assult.
2. No jail should not be looked at as punishment from an LE prospective it is a way to separate someone from society who is a danger to the general public.
3. So if #2 is true why do we lock up a drug addict for years but give a child sex offender ppj on the 1st 2nd 3rd…offence??? If we locked up only the really bad ones then we would not have any overcrowding,
4. Never forget any condition you put on the inmate you put on the officers that have to work there

Sooner or later they all get out so whatever they become we all have to deal with it in the end.

Photo_user_blank_big

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

Maybe we as law enforcement officers are failing. Perhaps it is us and not the judges, prosecutors, attorneys, etc that have this wrong. Maybe if we went kindlier and gentlier things would be different. Or, maybe the situation requires more compressed breaths, more pull directly to the rear, and a little more ride the recoil out and plot your shot. Just a thought....

9-11-logo_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

Jack, are you saying the way to solve the problem is to put a little bit of lead behind the ear?

8-O

;-)

Sheriff_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

Execute the ones on death row and not wait 20 years.Put murderers and rapist and cop killers on death row and execute them quick.

Photo_user_blank_big

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

Chap, I'm just saying that in many situations, we could have already dropped the bad guy and ended the whole debate. However, in the litigious society we live in, no one wants to put themselves in that precarious situation, so we wait until we are forced to shoot, and that is too late to stop the bad guys from killing us, see officer down threads, all ten thousand of them. Cops are not afraid of much, but being sued and losing everything you have worked for. Scares the crap out of me, I'll tell you that. We drop a few on a regular basis and prison life looks a little better. I'm not saying anything, just saying........

9-11-logo_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

There was a bad guy here, who killed NYS Trooper Joseph Longobardo, and wounded another. Big manhunt, and all sorts of speculation by all sorts of people about whether or not he'd be taken alive. And, I have to admit, a lot of folks were hoping he wouldn't be.

He was, and now he sits in prison, paid for by my taxes. Every so often he gets trotted out to court, the cameras click on his smirking face, and reporters report his family's reflections on what a great guy he really is.

And I imagine Joe Longobardo's little family has a struggle to make a go of it. My church did a benefit for him and raised a couple thousand dollars, but what is that? I go through that pretty fast myself, and I don't have a little child to pay for or think of educating.

But that's what makes the difference between folks like Joe Longobardo and his murderer. Joe and his colleagues will play it by the rules and make the world a better place, sometimes at great personal cost, while the other will just diminish it.

9-11-logo_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

That wasn't very "chaplainly" of me, was it?

3734983337_1__max50

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

It was very human of you chaps.

9-11-logo_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

Yeah, I guess it's just common sense that it would go against the grain.

9-11-logo_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

http://www.odmp.org/officer.php?oid=18479

Joe's page

Flag911_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

There is a sheriff somewhere in AZ or NM that has "tent city" for a jail. He says that there is no need to waste taxpayers money to let them live better than the majority of the population with air conditioning and 3 hot meals a day...sitting on their asses. So, they live in tents and work all day. He has been hounded about it but says that "this is my county and my department and I will run it how I see fit...like it or not!" I think he is AMAZING and there should be more sheriffs like this!! That will cut down the crime rate!!!

Me_marching_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

Public shankings for small crimes, death for big ones and for those in prison, make them earn their keep or starve.

M_6f396fcae892882a13dee708edaef252_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

I read somewhere that in China, when a guy gets the death sentence, he has 30 days to appeal, then he's led out to a convenient roadside ditch, knelt down at the edge of it, and they administer a .32 bullet to his cerebral cortex. The Authorities then send his family a note telling them where they can retireve the body, along with a bill for the bullet.
Something like that might work here.
Seriously, I think the problem is really Recidivism. We put them in prison, pat their little behinds, teach them all kinds of wonderful new things they can do, arts, crafts and degree programs that they'll never get a chance to put iinto practice because they're convicted felons, and no one wants to hire an MBA or whatever with a felony record. SO they end up back in the same old situation, in hte same old place with the same people they failed with before, then we wonder why they go back to doing the same old crimes. Maybe we should use them to colonize the desert? The Oceans? Space? I don't know the answers, but I have lots of spiffy questions.

Images_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

Can't resist throwing my two-cents in............. Too many sit on death row for two long, exhaust all appeals and continue to sit there while it is debated on a humane way to execute them. I say we should be as humane as they were to their victims, and in a much shorter time span. A lot of death row inmates will die on death row of natural causes before the appeals games is played out.
Now as for prison "reform", today's prisons have revolving doors. Once they have been in the system for awhile or get into the system young, they tend to keep returning. On any given day, my co-workers and I can fairly accurately predict which released inmate we will see again or not. It is more often a matter of when rather than not. I have seen a guy released in the morning and be back in the same bunk by 2000 hour count. Had an officer from another agency tell me about a guy walked into a walmart picked up a TV, carried it out of the store, sat down on the curb and with asked by security what he thought he was doing, he told them to call the cops, he wanted to go back to prison. I could go on and on, but you get the idea. We will have to continue to build more prisons, or waste our tax dollars and safety by filling the private prisons, until we get back to the idea of personal accountability from a young age. Dr Spock did a great disservice to this country and people ate up the BS he was spewing. We have become a society that is too willing to accept excuses for unacceptable behavior. We also have multi-generational inmates, i.e. parent/child, siblings, cousins, etc. We are working very hard in Arizona to reduce the recidivism rate. We have programs for everything imaginable as a means to that end, but a lot of it comes down to the fact that these inmates have no coping skills, and have no firm values. The younger ones were raised with a if I want it I am entitled to it by whatever means, and working for it is usually NOT on the list. A large portion of the prison population cannot cope on the outside because they have no skills for making decisions. They spend years being told when to get up, make their beds, when to eat, to tuck in their shirts, etc. so on the outside, when they have no one to tell them step by step, what to do or how to do it, they are lost. In a lot of ways prison is very EASY. No real decisions, no real responsibilities (like working to survive, i.e. pay rent, food, medical, schooling, etc.). If they are not "coddled" you have a bunch of liberals hollering about human rights, but guaranteed these same liberals don't want that inmate getting out and moving in next door. *whew, I am stepping off my soap box now, as I have no real practical answers, though maybe some valid answers as to why*

Aa6e89f561d0434c9d5e491a4d740d38_1__max50

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

More Tent Cities...Speed up Death Row. It should take 25 years to appeal a death sentence. Step next door and review case transcript. If no errors, step next door and have a seat in the "Smoking Chair". You get the switch, I'll grab the bag..When the vans full, we go to lunch....We'll let Juan run the truck to the ME's office and meet us back at the Court House at 1400 for another load.