Law Enforcement Specialties >> Special Units (K9, SWAT, etc.) >> crime scene processing

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crime scene processing

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Calico_jack_max50

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Posted almost 7 years ago

 

what do your agency's crime scene officers do?
is processing crime scenes their only job?
when do you call a crime scene officer to your scene?


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Newpatch_sq90_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

Small scenes are processed by the detectives. Large scenes such as a homicide scene we would call in the Colorado Bureau of Investigation.


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Petebombsuit1b_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

In our agency, all the Investigators have attended Crime Scene training and handle most scenes. On occassion, I have been called to assist on some death investigation scenes, in that I was a Crime Scene Specialist with the Georgia Bureau of Investigation at the time of my retirement from them. On major cases the GBI Crime Scene Unit is requested simply due to having more technical equipment and being able to dedicate an Agent to the crime scene investigation which allows agency investigators to follow up on various leads, interviews, etc.

Detective_coin_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

Each patrol shift has assigned Uniformed Investigators who have gone to Crime Scene Processing school and are equipped with good digital cameras, fingerprint gear, dna collection, and evidence collection kit. They handle burglaries, robberies, thefts, and felony assault scenes.

For major scenes such as homicide, serial sexual assault, or multiple victim shootings, we have a three Crime Scene Teams that serve a monthly rotation. They respond with a 32' motor home that has been built from the ground up as a Crime Van and has more gear, they act as a team.

I posted Civilian Crime Scene Teams a week or so ago asking about Civilian teams because the one disadvantage we have is running these teams into the ground in a heavy call month. When they go to a scene they can be there 30 hours then have all the paper from the scene and have case loads or shift work to go back to. I am still looking for input there.

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

Small crime scenes we as Detectives process the scene..if it is a major scene, everybody rolls out from the Sheriff on down..once at the scene we are assigned our tasked by the Capt of Detectives....Also we call in the Texas Rangers to assist with the investigation

Auguste_gusteau_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

Ever see CSI Las Vegas? Well if you have you know what ours do........................... NOT!!

Yes they process the crime scenes, but NO the don't tell Detectives what to do and they DONT interview suspects.

akhunter, I did not see your post, but to answer your question our agency went away from commissioned crime scene analysts long ago, it is less expensive to have a civilian, and in addition the specialization required lends itself better to having a civilian as opposed to commissioned since commissioned tend to move around more and promote.


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Monkey_in_glasses_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

Our street officers process the small crime scenes (fingerprints, photographs done by supervisors...burglary's, some shootings, armed robbery, etc). Any blood collection or a major crime scene (homicide or major Assault with Dangerous/Deadly Weapon, officer involved shooting, etc) we call out our Crime Scene Unit, which is comprised of uniformed officers who have been through intensive specialized training. We only have 1 or 2 crime scene unit officers working per shift so they stay very busy.

Detective_coin_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

Oso337 said:

Ever see CSI Las Vegas? Well if you have you know what ours do........................... NOT!!

Yes they process the crime scenes, but NO the don't tell Detectives what to do and they DONT interview suspects.

akhunter, I did not see your post, but to answer your question our agency went away from commissioned crime scene analysts long ago, it is less expensive to have a civilian, and in addition the specialization required lends itself better to having a civilian as opposed to commissioned since commissioned tend to move around more and promote.

Thanks for the response, you are on track with my thoughts and what I am trying to document. I hear it's kind of the trend state side.

Marvin_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 6 years ago

 

I agree with Oso337, in my department, where I am a Crime Scene Investigator, we do not tell the detectives what to do. We are utilized at large scenes including Homicides (really any unidentified death), Armed Robberies, Sexual Assualts, and we do follow-ups. Burglary detectives handle their own, unless it can be considered a serial burglar, or its a large business or government building. We do not do car burglaries, that would require another whole division just for those. We are police officers, and our division has always used police officers. We teach our academy trainees how to process basic scenes, and we have retrainers for current officers. All new detectives go through an additional crime scene processing class, so they don't watch shows like CSI and think we can get DNA in 5 minutes.

Att00065_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 6 years ago

 

In our department we have a small division, which rolls on any calls by the patrol division, the detectives and anyone else who calls. They can call us out on anything and do. If it sounds  like we're swamped with calls it's because we are. Our division is still at the same staffing levels as the late sixties when the Crime Scene division handle eight calls a week. Once I had to photograph the fence that replaced the old fence which was torn down by a burglar the week before. The patrol deputy did this because his rank wouldn't let him handle a supplemental report to a burglary without calling for crime scene.

Copdonut_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 6 years ago

 

I was a Crime Scene Investigator (Evidence Crew) for my department for 9 years before getting promoted to Sergeant.  In our department our C.S.I. unit is combined with our Latent Print/I.D. section.


Our C.S.I. unit has 8 members that cover the city 24/7.  They work out of a garage behind one of our police districts and drive full size pick up trucks with utility boxes on the back.  They do not answer calls for service, staying available to answer beat cars requests for evidence unit.


Our policy indicates that Crime Scene Investigations will be called whenever the beat car determines that the need for specialized collection or preservation of evidence is needed.  Could be a multiple homicide which I did by myself, or to process a spray can that some vandal sprayed the railroad overpass with.


CSI (Miami/Ney York/Las Vegas/ et al) have made that job a lot tougher as everyone thinks they are a forensic scientist.  Whenever I would go to someones house to process their burglary and they would say.."Oh I watch CSI all the time" my favorite response was to reply.."Well your about to be severely disappointed then".