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At what age do you retire from Police Work???

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100_0972_max50

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Posted almost 7 years ago

 

I am 3 1/2 yrs away from retiring from Police Work with 30 yrs combined military & civilian law enforcement service. Since we don't receive any medical benefits after retirement, I am tossed between continue working in LE or getting out and finding some other field to work in. I will be 49 yrs old when I reach retirement eligibility to start drawing my pension. What's the general consensus, stay in Law Enforcement or find another line of work????

Newhk_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

Lol my old Chief retired in his 70's


"Don't interfere with anything in the Constitution. That must be maintained, for it is the only safeguard of our liberties." -
-- Abraham Lincoln

Mcso_patch_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

Well i dont think that you can ever leave law enforcement. one of my 'role models' is 64 and he is 'retired' but still works for the Sheriffs patrol(reserve deputy) he said he will never be able to completely leave law enforcement. i would say to stick it out as long as you are physically able and willing to do the job


I'm strong on the surface, not all the way through I've never been perfect, but neither have you So if you're asking me, I want you to know When my time comes, forget the wrong that I've done Help me leave behind some reasons to be missed Don't resent me, and when you're feeling empty Keep me in your memory

Newhk_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

Yeah.. all personal prefence though i guess... like i said my chief retired in his 70's... 7 years he before he retired his wife died and 6 months before his daughter was killed in a traffic accident and he's rasing her 8 yr old son... its a small town here... the office phone was forwarded to his house.. he'd be out answering calls all night when nobody was around... looking back he'll tell you now he always thought this job was sooo important.. but looking back on all the times he lost with his family and now that he isnt able to spend time with them... he woulda retired earlier.


"Don't interfere with anything in the Constitution. That must be maintained, for it is the only safeguard of our liberties." -
-- Abraham Lincoln

Photo_user_banned_big

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

FireCop, I'll retire from the Army at 44 and plan on returnig to LE for a second career, working till I'm 60. I figure that's 44 totaly years of public service, age 16 VF/EMT, solider, cop, back to soldier and LE again. Will I ever truly stop working? I doubt it. Why not move south and take a small town chief job where it's warmer and your pension plus new chief salary will afford you some nice comfortable living??? Just an idea, TX is pretty damn nice. LOL

L_4eb5ff4ba9f23b380178c8b242362722_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

It depends on what you want to do. You can still work in a law enforcement field without being law enforcement. I can't work in the public police field anymore because I was diagnosised with Remitting Relapsing MS which apparently makes me a liablity. However I still work in the private sector working investigations, searchs and a variety of other tasks and make a good living. On top of that I can work in my pjs if necessary and I can set my own work schedule. I would love to still work in the public sector but I can make more money to support my family this way so it's a catch 22 depending on what your wants and needs are.

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

Old enough to know better still to young to care! Fishing sucks this time of year catch nothing but ice and hunting is over in a few weeks except varmints.

Srt_tactical_patch_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

I hear retirement stories like this I consider myself lucky. Retirement without medical benefits? The upside is that you will only be 49 at retirement. Personally the experience you have gained at this point in your career puts you in a great position. If you still enjoy going to work at retirement age you can continue unless you have mandatory retirement. Or you can take that experience and offer it to another public safety agency or related field that will earn a paycheck and the benefits needed. Who knows you may stay long enough to earn a second pension.

Detective_coin_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

I retired at 42 with 21 on. Then hired back on in a different retirement system & started all over again. Mean time I am drawing my retirement and enjoying life!

Motor_cop_comic_max160_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

I'm 54, working on year #29...haven't decided when I will retire...


"You can't lead from behind" Gen'l James Longstreet, CSA

Robertmitchum_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

I will retire when I am good and ready............. Once I have enough in my retirement and supplemental accounts to actually retire and not have a worry.


For so long as one hundred men remain alive, we shall never under any conditions submit to the domination of the English. It is not for glory or riches or honours that we fight, but only for liberty, which no good man will consent to lose but with his life.

The Declaration of Arbroath, 1320

SCREW TIBET FREE SCOTLAND !!!!

Photo_user_blank_big

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

Regarless of age, it's when your body tells you you should stay in bed instead of going to work! Listen to it!

Samp134754c0b5af0df7_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

Its hard for me to imagine retirement because I am just starting out but I have always thought that you should retire when you're ready.. not count down until a specific date.

Mmp_race_04

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

I was lucky in life and my career. My plan allowed me to retire at 20 years and start drawing immediately, which I have been doing for the past 16 years. I retired on Friday and went to work as a civilian communications manager the next Monday, in the mountains of Colorado. Drew double income for the next 14 years, so I am now between careers without having to worry if I ever work again, which I don't plan to. Too much volunteer stuff to keep me busy. I don't have medical coverage through my agency either. I buy mine through AARP which you can join on your 50th birthday, if you wish. Their rates and coverages are about the best I could find. They are now including family coverage in many states, as well.

Most importantly, there is life after policing and I found it to be VERY good...

Just_passin__thru_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

Yet, on the other hand .... from the Officer Down Memorial Page

"Officer Robert Winget was a US Marine Corps veteran and had served with the Ripon Police Department for 3 years. He previously served with the Los Angeles Police Department for 20 years and the Stanislaus County Sheriff's Department for 14 years. He is survived by his wife, son, and three daughters."

Bob died while riding a quad working patrol on a canal bank. Tipped over and it crushed him.

Do the math: unknown years as a Marine, 20 yrs LAPD, 14 yrs S/O, 3 yrs PD.

That's *37 years* in the saddle. He died at work.

A few months before his death he was asked about retirement. His response was something like, "I dunno but I'd like to spend some time at home."

Just for your consideration. We would all love to think we could ride into the sunset with a long retirement of messing around til you completely tap out your pension.

Would you want some newspaper somewhere to read "survived by ....." ?

Or something more like, "He completed a full and honorable career. He died peacefully in his sleep of natural causes with his adult children, his grandchildren, great grandchildren by his side. He is preceded by his wife of 50 years."

Just thinking out loud....


The Guy !
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Honoring the Fallen

Autumn_leaves_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

I started at 38, 20 years will mark my 58th birthday. I'll never really leave law enforcement. It's like leaving the Marine Corp. You are NEVER an ex, but a "former". My dad spent 30 years in the Corp, then retired and really never left. I think my career as an LEO will be the same. I can never imagine ever leaving.

Nypd_helicopter_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

In 7 1/2 years I'll retire at 45 years old, with 20 years on the NYPD. I'm not sure where I'll land after that. I've looked into Virginia and North Carolina. Maybe then I'll start another part-time or reserve officer position down there.

Just_passin__thru_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

Good point, rlindsey.

I think some people want to leave but don't leave because of that very thing: Leaving and the stigma versus being a former LEO after an honorable career. The Marines aren't the only ones that have the "Once a Marine, always a Marine" thing locked down.

Once a cop, always a cop. Just start up a conversation with someone and see if they don't start probing for answers. Some off our retired guys can speak to that.


The Guy !
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Honoring the Fallen

073009watchdog2_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

I am 43, when I hit 50, I will have 31 years in, and at 51, the pin gets pulled no matter what. I look at "The Sarge" post, and it reminds me of friends of mine that have come and gone during there "working" time. I want my obit to the same as the end of Sarges post! As for another job, there are states that I have not fished and hunted in, and family and friends that I don't get to spend enough time with, so that should keep me busy for a long, long time. Merry Christmas one and all!

Robertmitchum_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

nypdblue said:

In 7 1/2 years I'll retire at 45 years old, with 20 years on the NYPD. I'm not sure where I'll land after that. I've looked into Virginia and North Carolina. Maybe then I'll start another part-time or reserve officer position down there.

there are ALOT of retired NYPD officers working in central Virginia


For so long as one hundred men remain alive, we shall never under any conditions submit to the domination of the English. It is not for glory or riches or honours that we fight, but only for liberty, which no good man will consent to lose but with his life.

The Declaration of Arbroath, 1320

SCREW TIBET FREE SCOTLAND !!!!

Motor_cop_comic_max160_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

flsogrl said:

Its hard for me to imagine retirement because I am just starting out but I have always thought that you should retire when you're ready.. not count down until a specific date.

It happens far faster than you might expect. It seems like last week when I was sworn is as a deputy sheriff, and just yesterday that I was sworn in at my present agency. We are hiring officers that weren't even born when I became a cop. That will make you feel old in a hurry! Ahh well, as long as I can still keep my motorcycle upright...


"You can't lead from behind" Gen'l James Longstreet, CSA

Robertmitchum_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

sgt457 I know what you mean. Had a new rookie start about three months ago. I asked her if her mother knew where she was at and then asked her who gave her the gun.......


For so long as one hundred men remain alive, we shall never under any conditions submit to the domination of the English. It is not for glory or riches or honours that we fight, but only for liberty, which no good man will consent to lose but with his life.

The Declaration of Arbroath, 1320

SCREW TIBET FREE SCOTLAND !!!!

Auguste_gusteau_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

Unlike many here I plan on leaving LE behind when I retire.... I have 20 months until I am eligible, although I will probably stick around for another couple of years after that. When I retire I do not plan on coming back to LE, I have no doubt I will do something and have several irons in the fire, it just wont be LE.

Don't get me wrong I love being the police and will always have the police mindset, I just feel it is time to move on to something else.

As a good friend of mine, who is now retired said, he is on the "3 plan" 3 times less stress and 3 times more pay in the civilian world than in LE....Plus of course I won't have to work New Years Eve on the strip... did I mention how much I HATE NEW YEARS EVE..... DAMN DRUNKEN TOURISTS....500,000 ASSHOLES ALL IN ONE NIGHT... GOD I HATE THAT!


"Courage is being scared to death, but saddling up anyway"
John Wayne 1907-1979

Robertmitchum_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

I will either go to law school or open a motorcycle shop........


For so long as one hundred men remain alive, we shall never under any conditions submit to the domination of the English. It is not for glory or riches or honours that we fight, but only for liberty, which no good man will consent to lose but with his life.

The Declaration of Arbroath, 1320

SCREW TIBET FREE SCOTLAND !!!!

Shedevil2_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

well guys , got just a few months to go and i echo the sentiments of some that have already posted ...........after having to be a mother and an officer all my career , i'm looking forward to not having to go in and work the streets .........i'll have 22 years in ........and oh yea i plan on becoming a sex therapist..............but only after doing quite a bit of travelling............oh wait i forgot to answer the question ...........i think it is time to hang the belt up when it's not as good as it gets anymore...............


...don't play with me , i'll keep you way up after your bedtime.....

Mmp_race_04

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

Retirement is such an individual thing. None of us can even guess what the other will do. It's a bit like being involved in a shooting, you just don't know until it happens. I loved my agency, liked my job, and hated the chief. Biggest and most educated yojo who pretended to know policing. He set our relationship the first month when he sent out an 'Al Sharpton' memo that said, "I have met with many minority groups in the city and I am now convinced that this agency is a very racial agency and that every employee here needs to correct that situation" (or something similar - but the same message).

I responded with a not so nice one page memo and asked for an audience with him. He mentioned it later in the week when he visited the substation where I was being interviewed after having shot a guy who shot one of our officers. Then, the good chief said they needed to go to the hospital to check on the victim. I told him I had just talked to the officer and he was in good shape, a minor shoulder wound. He said, "I meant the guy you shot". The guy had shot our officer, was an escapee from the county jail, driving a stolen van containing a stolen Ninja motorcycle and proceeds from burglaries and robberies he had committed and he had shot at pursuing officers with two different stolen guns during a long high speed chase. Victim, my ass. Did I mention the chief was a registered Democrat? Yep.

Anyway, I got on a diatribe, but you can see why I put up with the guy and his manure for a couple more years and then hauled ass. Now, they have what seems to be a pretty good chief out of the east.

Be sure when you pull the plug you have something to keep you busy, whether volunteer or cutting lawns, whatever, and keep your medical coverage, if you can. Stay busy, and stay in shape, and enjoy life!

138f8481-ffcf-4a8d-a670-1d1606d5df00_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

Thanks Tommyo and do be sure to keep it up Sgt457 LOL I havent decided what I want to do yet. I have a long way to go.


"spirit has fifty times the strength and staying power of brawn and muscle" unknown

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

Does Mrs. Sarge know you are planning to kill her off first?

Camo_kimber_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

I am going out the door at age 43 after 20 years in the business. My very first FTO told me to have another job in my back pocket at all times. When I retire from LE it will be to a job that allows me to be my own boss. No more having someone tell me what to do. If I want to take a day off I will.

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

I like Tommy was able to retire at a young age (40) and immediately began drawing retirement. I then found my second career in Law Enforcement. I was fortunate to have entered at a time that allowed you to retire after 10 years annd reaching age 50 . Well after a situation strikingly similar to Tommy's and a demotion for going over the A$$hole boss' head to the City Council, who up held the demotion (long story) I retired. I did not give up the fight and am still keeping the city embroiled in the legal system (FEDERAL). Including both Military (USMC) and LE time I have a total of 35 + years in govt service. I draw two retirements earning enough "to get by" . When the wife retires and I finally begin to collect SS I will be making more than when I worked. I miss the LE world terribly and would return in a "N.Y. second", but unfortunately some physical problems won't allow it. Fishing and hunting are fun but it's kind of like how many nights in a row can you eat your favorite meal without it getting BORING!! I am fortunate to have other interest working with wood (make custom picture frames) and working for one of the boys (sitting in a skidster, airconditioned cab w/radio pushing two handles all day ) so I manage to keep busy. Also it's amazing how many HONEY DO CHORES the little lady can come up with. Yard and house look great. Finished most of the basement, new windows, paint,etc And the stress level is much, much reduced. B/P down to 115/55-65. The only down fall is it looks like I swallowed a damn basketball. LOL. LIFE IS WHAT YOU MAKE IT. Nothing more ,nothing less.

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