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former convicts

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Posted over 7 years ago

 

I would like to know if you think serving long sentences helps the offender to understand the consequences of the crime. Do you feel that when they are released after say 10 years or longer, the person has benefitted from being removed from society. Do you think it is more harmful?

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

I think that the corrections system should be overhauled in general, as the inmates typically do not reform. However, a longer sentence keeps the convicted offender away from the general public, where they could continue to commit crimes. The corrections system in place now is not to reform the criminal, but to punish the criminal for the crime committed. Does it cut down on crime? Yes. If you were to release all of the convicted offenders today, the crime rate would sky-rocket. So, the benefit is not to the convict, but is to the public.

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

It's not so much about the benefit of the offender, as it is the benefit to society. Naturally you'd like to think that providing a consequence to an offender would help the rehabilitation of that person, but in reality, long prison sentences provide for the prophylactic incarceration of the dangerous where the inmate is unable to victimize society. From what I've seen, there is so much discretion used at all levels, that by the time a person is sent to prison - they have more than earned their place there.

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

Terri the correctional system does what it can to help improve the life style of convicted criminals. We have many educational programs in place for the inmates, we also have counsuling and mentoring programs in effect. The hole problem is if a person does not want to improve themselves and their lifestyles no one can force them to do it. We can only offer them the opportunity to do it.

Cpd_star_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

We all should know that prison doesn't make people better. Instead of blaming the system that locks that offender up or the one who houses him or her but blame the individual who places themself in prison. At some point you should understand the concept, "If I point a gun at someone and take their money, this is wrong."

Ltsh1_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

Throw away the key!

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

Ive seen in several cases that when a subject is released they made a 100% turn around. I guess the possibility of going to prison and the reality of being in prison kinda sets in.


Mercy to the guilty is cruelty to the innocent. .

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

My reason for asking this question has to do with the fact that I became involved with an offender who served 22 years. He was incarcerated at age 20 and is now 42. All his adult experiences were through inmates and programs. When he got out, it was a new world for him and his experiences about daily life that we know of it are new. Going out, being able to have family all the time, fishing, driving, having a woman take care of him, paying real bills and the cost of living. He is scared. What is the best way to handle this situation?

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

I don't know how this would be possible, but see if you can find some folks (former convicts) that recently got out and are trying to do the right thing. This may give him someone to vent to or even talk to about his experiences and what he's going through. There is some things that you will not understand and he probably doesn't want to get upset when he tells you the truth...........etc...

22yrs incarcerated - I would assume after that long, he is either a smarter more mature criminal or a Man of God. I have two uncles in the Pen and they just got better at the crime life..........yes they all do good at first since their running off adrenaline and that freedom sense, but when it really sinks in........I don't think he'll make it unless he is or is giong to be a God fearing man........that's my opinion anyway........no disrespect.......just that's what I've seen time and time again........Goodluck and tell him I said Hi

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

He told me alot already about the poor treatment by officers but also his rebellion periods. He was able to have a good man, church going to be his mentor for many years. But that person died in prison. I feel that he has many issues to deal with and I know that having a mentor outside the walls would be helpful. We went through alot already....how to do a job interview and he got the job, finding a vehicle (now it is how to repair it and what happens when it makes a "noise"), trying to stay away from the bars. I think dealing with all those personality types in prison has given him multiple personalities. It's not good....he plays the part too well.

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

I don't know what to tell ya then........Only you know when you should get out or stick with it...........I know my grand parents tried for 30 yrs and those two boys spent their retirement up and my grandpa retired twice........once in the Navy and once in the jewelry business...........all the $$$ gone.......m-m-m........I don't know.......pray

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

terri, try doing an on-line search for programs that help ex-convicts make the transition.

When I lived in NYC 25 years ago there was a program called "Inside Out" that worked with prisoners before and after release, dealing with very practical issues like: where to live, how to support oneself, how NOT to fall back into the same crowd. It had cut down the recidivism rate dramatically for the prisoners it worked with, but I have no idea if it is still functioning.

However, if it is not functioning still, or where you live, there may well be some other sort of program available. You could try a search for "Kairos", which is a Cursillo-type ministry to convicts-- they might be aware of any programs that are out there for ex-cons. If there was a chaplain at his prison, you could try contacting him/her to ask about local programs.

Good luck! No one wants him to do anything that will get him landed back in prison.

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

Incidentally, terri-- just looking up a counselling service in your area might be a good idea. They might be able to find a counselor who has specialized expertise, but even if they could not, a regular counselor could be helpful. I know counselling has a reputation for being expensive, but the fact is there are many places that have sliding fee scales, based on income.

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

You could research addictive personalities. People can be addicted to things other than substance abuse. I think it's about what motivates the person.


In like manner the spirit also joins in with help for our weakness, for the problem of what we should pray for as we need to we do not know but the spirit itself pleads for us with groanings uttered.

No man serving as a soldier involves himself in the commercial businesses of life, in order that he may gain the approval of the one who enrolled him as a soldier. 5. Moreover, if anyone conten

New-patch_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

I would say that for the large portion of the population that has been to prison, the answer is NO. All you need to do is look at the rate of recidivism. It's also important to remember that in some cultures in the United States, going to prison is a status symbol.

Me_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

Long sentences does not help. That just gives the convicts more time to think up a plan for their next crime.


"Help me today to be a help and example to all. To bring strength and encourgement wherever I am, Through Jesus Christ my Savior, Amen

1z6tp9w_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

some people will never change and some do. most dont

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

This is my take on the topic. Once a person has a felony rap or 2 on their record, they are pretty much SOLwhen it comes to getting hired by the govt/state/city, they can't apply for home loans or bank loans & they don't wanna work for 8$ an hr so they just figure "screw it" I can make way more $$ hustling/dealing, etc & take my chances with the law! The vast majority of repeat offenders that get busted on a daily basis proves that incarceration does nothing to change their ways & the revolving door policy of this country when it comes to criminals is a freakin joke! The main excuse I always hear is that the prisons are so overcrowded so they have to let out the least serious offenders earlier than they want to in order to keep the hard core ones in longer.

Real simple solution, take all those Navy ships that the Navy is always decommisioning & turning into scrap or museums & turn them into floating prisons, throw all the freakin criminals on them till you can't fit no more, take the ship out to sea about 10 miles out, anchor it & let the prisoners police themselves & once a month we chopper in a few pallets of MREs & water for them to fight over!

Am I a genius or what! LOL!

Semper Fi

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

Thanos0341- Sounds just like how the California Department of Corrections (and Rehabilitation) started!

I'm going to ask some serious questions, and if you can answer these, you get a free cup of coffee:

1. What is it a Corrections agency is supposed to accomplish?.....Reform? Punishment? Rehabilitation? And exactly how are they supposed to accomplish it?.... Hardship? Programs? Therapy?

This is why there hangs a stigma around "Corrections".

No, the only goal that any sane Corrections Department should have is designated straight out of Penal Code, and it goes a little something like this:

..(department) is tasked with the responsibility of housing and isolating the offender away from the community for the duration of their legally imposed sentence.

Period.

There is never any question about the front end of the justice system. Because patrol has not completely eradicated "crime", does this mean we need to overhaul the Police Departments?

What about probation and parole?

Isn't it the Probation Departments responsibility to ensure the sentenced gets resources in the community to stop his illegal activities in lieu of a custody commitment, and monitor for illegal activity?

Isn't it the Parole Departments responisibility to assist the newly released inmate with reintegration into society while monitoring for illegal activity?

As for the question of whether it is harmful, I have to ask in whose view?
The original victims of the parolee? The parolee's family, who have endured hardship and shame due to no fault of their own? Or the parolee, who made a conscious decision to destroy their own life and the lives of close family members, to victimize and then have their every need facilitated by the law abiding tax payers and the State?

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

So, after that tirade, I believe it is unrealistic to place the blame or failure on just one component of the justice system. That was the main point...

And if society, and by this I mean people, feel shorter sentences are "just", then boys and girls, we are only tasked with enforcing the laws that have been enacted....

Liz_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

Terri, I do not think you will ever find an answer that you like. I think that you have a long road ahead of you, as well as your friend. Responding to your original question. All people are different. Sounds like your friend did 20 years so it must have been a serious crime. If this crime would have been against you, what would your opinion be. 20 is not long enough or to long? You asked for my opinion so here it is. I think that a person should get what is given at the time of sentencing, that is why they have a sentincing hearing. Once it is given, then you should have to do ALL the time given. While you are there you should be made to do hard labor to self run the prision or instiution that you are attending. This will keep you in touch with the real working world. If you do not participate in the program then you will stay until you do. Force the inmates to keep up with the times. I think that if a person does what is required and goes along with the program which includes keeping the inmate up with current issues, that once they serve ALL the time issued to them they can transition back into society. My thought is if you do something to get 20 years than sorry if you do not like it. Hopefully you will not do it again.

Me_in_front_of_destroyed_t-54_iraqi_tank_5-2-03_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

I'm still sticking to using decomissioned Naval ships as floating prisons!

Back_yard_photos_014_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

Most offenders will return to prison...that is a proven fact. Even in our maximun security prisons, overcrowding is a major issue. Prison overcrowding, in turn, endangers the lives of those dedicated men and women that serve in the prison system. I think the only thing criminals learn in prison is how to be better criminals. I support the abolishment of the parole system. Money currently spent on parole boards and parole officer would be spent on improving the prison guards salaries. If we can spend billions in Iraq, then we can also spend billions in this country to build better and safer prisons (for the sake of the guards). Tear down the old, outdated prisons. House these individuals offenders for the entire length of their sentence. No gain time, no good time, just hard time breaking up rock and picking up trash on the sides of the roads.

Me_in_front_of_destroyed_t-54_iraqi_tank_5-2-03_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

Prison should be a hellish place that after these cons do their time & get out, they will never want to break the law & risk going back to jail! Get rid of the gyms, we don't need stronger criminals, get rid of the books, don't need smarter criminals either! Get rid of the 3 hots & a cot, give em a turkey/cheese sandwich 2x a day & give em a 1 inch thick isomat as a freakin mattress. Showers once a week. Like criminaltracker said, have them break big rocks into tiny little rocks 8 hrs a day & police up all the trash they can find on the roads as well.

I bet that would make them very reluctant to become repeat offenders.

Ah, lemme stop dreaming, this is America, where criminals have more rights than the victims they hurt, raped or killed did.