General Forums >> Officer Down >> Going for your radio in a fight

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Going for your radio in a fight

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Copavatar_max50

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Posted over 7 years ago

 

We had an incident a few nights ago at a neighboring agency in that an officer went to arrest a suspect. However, instead of going quietly, suspect decided to fight the officer. What was different about this fight, is that instead of automatically going for the officer's gun (as many suspects do), the suspect went for the officer's radio instead. Later, the suspect admitted that he wanted the radio so the officer would not be able to call for help, and then go for the gun.

Has anyone else seen this tactic by gang-bangers or come by similar incidents?

New-patch_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

never heard of this happening to anyone I work with. Glad the officer made it out OK.

702928025505_0_alb_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

No, I have not heard of this but I will pass it along in roll call.

Email10_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

Wow, this has never crossed my mind... I'll definitely pass it along. Thanks!

Picture_109_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

Interesting point, this never occurred to me, but makes a lot of since. I will pass along, and we should keep a close eye on all our equipment that we wear. Sometiimes I believe it's a status thing to some gang bangers or just to get something that a cop carry's seems to have some type of symbol to them.

Photo_user_blank_big

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

Trooper Bruce Heck, who was killed in Glennallen, Alaska in 1997 was found with his radio turned off. The best guess is that during the fighting (which went to the ground) the bad guy turned it off.

Arms_crossed_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

Greetings,

I guess the question is how do we carry our radios? Are they on our hip, hand, in a radio case, on a whisper mc and etc. The radio is indeed our life line. I hope I don't ever encounter the same incident. I'll have to brief this during our next guardmount/mustard.

Thanks

v/r

Michael Munyon
www.munyondojang.com

Copavatar_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

Generally a radio will be (or should be in my opinion) on your belt... support side, with a mic on your shoulder of the same side. The reason being that if you do get into a sticky situation, you have your strong-hand available for defense and or open to get to your weapon (or protect it) while you use your support hand to activate the radio and call out for backup. The key is that it should be easily available and ready to go in all situations.

Panama2_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

Just goes to show you that you have to be ready for anything out there...

1460209889_m_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

Never heard of it but will pass it along, thanks for the tip!!


Mercy to the guilty is cruelty to the innocent. .

Markflag_-_jpg_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

We have (at considerable expense - advantages of private security) started to outfit our new radios that include GPS and a "panic" button. If it's pushed three times in quick succession (under 15 seconds), the radio starts screaming for help - it broadcasts an automatic "10-33, Officer needs assistance!" plea over the radio. (We're "10-33" here in Canada, instead of "10-13". Not sure why.)

Of course, if it gets turned off, it's no good either. Something for my recruits to think about, I suppose.

Dscn1263_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

This is very common in Florida. (they train for this in prison)...Had it happen to me a couple of times. Forget the mic on your shoulder and remember your key up on your hip. You can better defend yourself from the hip than the shoulder, plus your guarding your firearm and other equipment in an attack. Just remember BASIC FIREARMS RETENTION and wait for the troops.

Badge_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

Common in miami too. I've had guys try the same thing but tankfully our radios down here have a red button (3-15 in our radio codes means officer needs assistnace). Guys in prison practice this, stabbing you in places where your vest doesn't protect (arms pits, etc.) even taking and trowing away handcuffs and car keys. I've never been a big fan of the shoulder mic. To me, its something a subject can strangle you with. But like "aostone" said. Just remember basic retention and as long as you pressed that button, even if you didn't ask for 3-15's the whole world will be comming. Good luck. and be safe out-there.

Pm_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

Actually, a very interesting point. It happen to me last night. Fortunatley, there were others Officers already on scene. I was detaining a burlgary suspect who started to fight. During the incident the suspect grabbed my radio cord and started to yank it. I was unable to use the radio. If this act was intentional I am not sure, but it does happen. Stay Safe!

Me_in_front_of_destroyed_t-54_iraqi_tank_5-2-03_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

Question for those of you that this has happened to, or worse yet, the suspect is going for your gun, why don't you just either jab em in the eye, head butt them or strike em in the larynx?

I bet they'll let go in a NY minute if you do that!

9-11-logo_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

I once saw a cop demonstrate the weakness of putting your mic on the shoulder: you then turn your head away from your subject to speak, unless you have your body turned away already. He was a firm proponent of putting the mic right in the center so you could keep eyes forward.

I have indeed heard of cops losing their radio contact during a fight.

Michael_pic_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

That is crazy.

Cpd_star_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

This happened to an officer two years ago. She was recovering a stolen car a the bad guy came back for the vehicle. He attacked the P.O. and took her radio and struck her several times with it.

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

I wonder if there's case law about this. Would a suspect attempting to isolate the officer by disabling communication justify deadly force?

I wasn't refering to CPD's post...that one is obvious.

Uncle_sam_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

I'm not an LEO yet but i'm wondering if you're allowed to modify the volume knob on the radio .i.e placement of black electrical tape, subdued duct tape, or something of the sorts to inhibit their ability to turn the radio off if they do get a hand on the knob. I'm one of those McGyver kinda guys. I have a motorola shoulder mic at work that has volume control on the actual mic, might be a good investment if your agency can afford it.

Psd_fox_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

I have never heard of anyoe doing this either. I guess if someone did get my radio it would possibly buy some extra time to get to my taser, spray or gun if need be. the department I work for has gone to the ICOP Digital video in-car systme, the mic body pack has a Help button built in, so if someone did manage to get my radio off of me I could hit the help button and still get back up on the way.

Egale_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

This issue should be brought to the attention of the radio manufactures. They might be able to make an after market volume lock. Also, they may incorporate some sort of lock in future models.

100_1981_3__max50

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

This has been very common in the two departments I have worked for. My dept has provided every officer an ear piece for their radio that you run up through the inside of your shirt and the mic can be clipped to the inside of your shirt and is about an inch long and 1/4 inch wide. It would be a little harder for the perp to grap such a small mic. I think the panic button / GPS is also a good investment for any dept. There was a video I saw in the academy where an officer activated his panic button & the perp didn't know. The officers life was saved because of the panic button.


"It would be better for one to have a stone tied around their neck and thrown into the sea, than to cause a child to stumble."

"Well-behaved women rarely make history"

Photo_user_blank_big

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

Interesting tactic by the suspect. I know of no documented similar incidents, but I will do some research on this one and get back to you.....

Aa6e89f561d0434c9d5e491a4d740d38_1__max50

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

I have never had it happen to me. Nor have I heard of it happening in Georgia. It is some thing I will have to look at and prepare to prevent. I will pass it along.

Misty_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

This happened to me on May 3, 2007. The suspect, a known trafficker and user, went right for my radio. Thankfully, my partner was able to call for backup as I wreslted with him for those split seconds. I would hate to think what would have happened. Although I still could have pushed our emergency orange button and help would be enroute. I will pass this info around since reading this because until now, I really never gave it much thought. Thanks for the heads up.

Back_yard_photos_014_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

I have never had anyone go for my radio during a fight. I don't want to say this with any sense of bravado, but I am not thinking about calling for help on the radio once a fight has started. I work in a large department and the only time we normally find ourselves one on one is during a traffic stop. And in those cases, I am aware no one will get to me in time. So I am not thinking about grabbing the radio at that point. Again, I say this with no sense of bravado and I thank God above for watching over me these past 26 years.

Photo_user_blank_big

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

I have not been in a ton of fights as I have only had a year's experience, and I have never once even though about someone going for my radio to disable me from communicating with my fellow officers. I am extremely glad I read this posting, I can say now that just reading this opened my mind to better officer safety. Right after reading this, I brought this to my sergeants attention in an attempt to pass this along to the entire department.

Pl25_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

Hmmm that does worry me, I have never heard or even thought of that before. I will be sure to pass this along to the LEOs I come in contact with as well as those at the substation. Also 10-33/10-13 different areas have different brevity codes 10-35 and 11-99 are our assisstance calls. 11-99 being the emergency.

3734983337_1__max50

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Rate This | Posted over 7 years ago

 

this goes back to tactical patrol training.. we teach how to defend against this kind of attack .it is also covered in reading body language.

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