Law Enforcement Specialties >> Communications Center >> An Officer’s “Thanks” to the Dispatchers

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An Officer’s “Thanks” to the Dispatchers

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Posted over 5 years ago

 

copied from 911 magazine online http://www.9-1magazine.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=248...">1-1magazine.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=2...


 


An Officer’s “Thanks” to the Dispatchers

by Deputy Tim Lindsey

Lamar County Sheriff’s Office, Mississippi


It takes a special someone to do the job you do.

To answer hundreds of calls a year with

“9-1-1, Where is your emergency?”

To ask all the right questions in order to get the needed help to someone in distress.

To patiently extract information from the kindergartner

who calls and tearfully whispers “My mommy won’t wake up.”

To cheerfully look up and relay phone numbers to the warrants officer when what you really

want to say is, “Why don’t you put a FREAKIN’ phone book in your car!”

To be partially responsible for the apprehension of the armed robber two counties over because YOU notified surrounding agencies of the vehicle description thirty minutes before the shift commander thought about it.



It takes a special someone to do the job you do.

To sleep on a cot in the records room, break room or in the hall while your agency deals with the latest man-made or natural disaster to come along.

To strain to hear till your eardrum cramps because some people absolutely refuse to hold the mike up to their mouth while they talk.

To carry on three different conversations, on the phone, on the radio, and in person and keep them all straight.

To deal with the drunk at the drive-thru who called 9-1-1 because they put too much ketchup on his hamburger. Yeah, he went to jail!

To talk the lady through the proper procedures when her daughter went into labor two weeks early and gave birth in the bathroom.



It takes a special someone to do the job you do.

To take control, give directions and calm down the hysterical woman who accidentally shot her loving husband.

To take control, give direction and calm down the hysterical woman who intentionally shot her abusive husband.

To run 28’s, 29’s, Triple I’s, “All Systems”, and warrants checks and not pull out all your hair in the process.

To spend hours on end training the “newbie” in the skills you have acquired over the years.

To work with the “newbie” for weeks at a time when you knew from day one that they weren’t going to be able to cut it.


It takes a special someone to do the job you do.

To answer your home phone in the middle of the night with “9-1-1, where’s your emergency?”

To ride the emotional roller-coaster on the call where the three year old boy followed his dog into the woods wearing only his Scooby-Doo underoos, got lost, got found three days later by search & rescue still alive, was carried through dense woods and thick underbrush over three miles to the command post, picked up by ambulance and then died fifteen minutes from the hospital.

To comfort, support, and encourage each other when one of your guys is killed in the line of duty.

To stay awake and alert from 0330 hours to 0530 hours when things finally settle down on Saturday night.

To work under enough pressure and stress that a CEO in the private sector under the same would earn a million dollar bonus.



You are that special someone!

You are the MY dispatcher and I thank God for you!



If it should happen that I leave this life before you, I will stand  face to face with God and thank Him for making people like you.

I will then go stand by the gates and I will wait for you.


 


Andrea ~ NC Highway Patrol Telecommunications ~ 15 years

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That was Awesome.....Thanks

Kimo_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 5 years ago

 

 Thanks for sharing this, shplifeline.

Vacation_133_max50

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Thank you so much for thinking of us dispatchers. God Bless Us All..

1037_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 5 years ago

 

It is not that some officers just don't appreciate what we do, they just simply don't understand what all we have to do deal with. It is so refreshing to hear such encouraging words from someone who does understand. Thanks!


911 Where is your emergency?

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Rate This | Posted about 5 years ago

 

I applied for a dispatcher job before I got into corrections. The first question the interviewer ask me was, "Are you prepared to take a call that could possibly involve a life or death situation involving your own family"? I lied and said YES but I knew then and there that I could never do dispatch work. I respect you guys and girls and give you MAJOR credit for the job you do!

Policecross_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 5 years ago

 

 


Wow, this was so nice to hear!


Thank you for posting this :)    Sometimes it's hard for anyone else to understand what it is like, but you hit the nail on the head. 


Thanks again for the post...you rock!!

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Rate This | Posted about 5 years ago

 

beautifully written and well said. thanks to all dispatchers

11-23-2006-10_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 5 years ago

 

I work in PACE and had an opporunity to shadow 9-1-1 and communication at my department thinking I might want to change my career path.  What an eye opening experience.   Dispatchers are an amazing group of people that have an extremely stressful job!   I take my hat (headphones) off to you!


PACE operator with the PHX PD

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Rate This | Posted about 5 years ago

 

I've always had the utmost appreciation for any telecommunicators.  They multitask like none other; it's impressive and also inperative that they possess these skills.  It makes the job us LEO's do much easier.  So, thank you.  We do appreciate all that you do.

Native_clip_art_4_049_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 5 years ago

 

All dispatchers I have ever worked with can be summed up in one word PROFESSIONALS. They are the life line of every officer on the street and they are trained specialist in a field that many time are overlooked and under appreciated.  To all dispatchers by whatever term your job description  Thank You For A Job Well Done.  They are the only people I know that can tell us where to go

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Rate This | Posted about 5 years ago

 

I know that to be true very heart felt.

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shplifeline says ...



copied from 911 magazine online http://www.9-1magazine.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=248...">1-1magazine.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=2...


 


An Officer’s “Thanks” to the Dispatchers

by Deputy Tim Lindsey

Lamar County Sheriff’s Office, Mississippi


It takes a special someone to do the job you do.

To answer hundreds of calls a year with

“9-1-1, Where is your emergency?”

To ask all the right questions in order to get the needed help to someone in distress.

To patiently extract information from the kindergartner

who calls and tearfully whispers “My mommy won’t wake up.”

To cheerfully look up and relay phone numbers to the warrants officer when what you really

want to say is, “Why don’t you put a FREAKIN’ phone book in your car!”

To be partially responsible for the apprehension of the armed robber two counties over because YOU notified surrounding agencies of the vehicle description thirty minutes before the shift commander thought about it.



It takes a special someone to do the job you do.

To sleep on a cot in the records room, break room or in the hall while your agency deals with the latest man-made or natural disaster to come along.

To strain to hear till your eardrum cramps because some people absolutely refuse to hold the mike up to their mouth while they talk.

To carry on three different conversations, on the phone, on the radio, and in person and keep them all straight.

To deal with the drunk at the drive-thru who called 9-1-1 because they put too much ketchup on his hamburger. Yeah, he went to jail!

To talk the lady through the proper procedures when her daughter went into labor two weeks early and gave birth in the bathroom.



It takes a special someone to do the job you do.

To take control, give directions and calm down the hysterical woman who accidentally shot her loving husband.

To take control, give direction and calm down the hysterical woman who intentionally shot her abusive husband.

To run 28’s, 29’s, Triple I’s, “All Systems”, and warrants checks and not pull out all your hair in the process.

To spend hours on end training the “newbie” in the skills you have acquired over the years.

To work with the “newbie” for weeks at a time when you knew from day one that they weren’t going to be able to cut it.


It takes a special someone to do the job you do.

To answer your home phone in the middle of the night with “9-1-1, where’s your emergency?”

To ride the emotional roller-coaster on the call where the three year old boy followed his dog into the woods wearing only his Scooby-Doo underoos, got lost, got found three days later by search & rescue still alive, was carried through dense woods and thick underbrush over three miles to the command post, picked up by ambulance and then died fifteen minutes from the hospital.

To comfort, support, and encourage each other when one of your guys is killed in the line of duty.

To stay awake and alert from 0330 hours to 0530 hours when things finally settle down on Saturday night.

To work under enough pressure and stress that a CEO in the private sector under the same would earn a million dollar bonus.



You are that special someone!

You are the MY dispatcher and I thank God for you!



If it should happen that I leave this life before you, I will stand  face to face with God and thank Him for making people like you.

I will then go stand by the gates and I will wait for you.


 



AMEN, to this, takes a special person on both ends of that radio.  God Bless the dispatchers as well as the LEOs

Telecommunicator_rusch_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 5 years ago

 

Appreciated, thank you SO very much... 


September 11, 2001... I will always remember

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Rate This | Posted about 5 years ago

 

Absolutely awesome! Thanks to you for remembering that we dispatchers are more than "just the voice in the machine"!

Badge_2__1__max50

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Rate This | Posted about 5 years ago

 

thanks not nearly said enough by us officers, troopers, deputies, firemen, emt.  thank God for that angel on the underend of that radio.      to all dispatchers thank you!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


bigwill

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Rate This | Posted about 5 years ago

 

THANK YOU FOR THIS, I JUST GOT OFF WORK FROM A STRESSFUL SHIFT AND THIS MADE ME FEEL BETTER

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Rate This | Posted about 5 years ago

 

Thank you for all you do.


http://www.iamsorryivotedforobama.com/

How's that HOPE and CHANGE working out for you?

What would you do for a Klondike bar?

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Rate This | Posted about 5 years ago

 

This is a great way to say thank you to the behind the scenes brothers and sisters, who we depend on so much to get the information we so vitally need to carry out our duty. The critical part can be in the details and we wish to thank all of you for what you do and you do it so magnificiently! All calls require critical thinking at any given time. 2 THUMBS UP FOR THE ANGELS AND SAINTS OUT THERE WHO ARE MAKING A DIFFERENCE! GOD BLESS EACH OF YOU.

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shplifeline says ...



copied from 911 magazine online http://www.9-1magazine.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=248...">1-1magazine.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=2...


 


An Officer’s “Thanks” to the Dispatchers

by Deputy Tim Lindsey

Lamar County Sheriff’s Office, Mississippi


It takes a special someone to do the job you do.

To answer hundreds of calls a year with

“9-1-1, Where is your emergency?”

To ask all the right questions in order to get the needed help to someone in distress.

To patiently extract information from the kindergartner

who calls and tearfully whispers “My mommy won’t wake up.”

To cheerfully look up and relay phone numbers to the warrants officer when what you really

want to say is, “Why don’t you put a FREAKIN’ phone book in your car!”

To be partially responsible for the apprehension of the armed robber two counties over because YOU notified surrounding agencies of the vehicle description thirty minutes before the shift commander thought about it.



It takes a special someone to do the job you do.

To sleep on a cot in the records room, break room or in the hall while your agency deals with the latest man-made or natural disaster to come along.

To strain to hear till your eardrum cramps because some people absolutely refuse to hold the mike up to their mouth while they talk.

To carry on three different conversations, on the phone, on the radio, and in person and keep them all straight.

To deal with the drunk at the drive-thru who called 9-1-1 because they put too much ketchup on his hamburger. Yeah, he went to jail!

To talk the lady through the proper procedures when her daughter went into labor two weeks early and gave birth in the bathroom.



It takes a special someone to do the job you do.

To take control, give directions and calm down the hysterical woman who accidentally shot her loving husband.

To take control, give direction and calm down the hysterical woman who intentionally shot her abusive husband.

To run 28’s, 29’s, Triple I’s, “All Systems”, and warrants checks and not pull out all your hair in the process.

To spend hours on end training the “newbie” in the skills you have acquired over the years.

To work with the “newbie” for weeks at a time when you knew from day one that they weren’t going to be able to cut it.


It takes a special someone to do the job you do.

To answer your home phone in the middle of the night with “9-1-1, where’s your emergency?”

To ride the emotional roller-coaster on the call where the three year old boy followed his dog into the woods wearing only his Scooby-Doo underoos, got lost, got found three days later by search & rescue still alive, was carried through dense woods and thick underbrush over three miles to the command post, picked up by ambulance and then died fifteen minutes from the hospital.

To comfort, support, and encourage each other when one of your guys is killed in the line of duty.

To stay awake and alert from 0330 hours to 0530 hours when things finally settle down on Saturday night.

To work under enough pressure and stress that a CEO in the private sector under the same would earn a million dollar bonus.



You are that special someone!

You are the MY dispatcher and I thank God for you!



If it should happen that I leave this life before you, I will stand  face to face with God and thank Him for making people like you.

I will then go stand by the gates and I will wait for you.


 



Thanks so much for this!!!!!


IN GOD WE TRUST... ALL OTHERS WE RUN NCIC

RIP MOM... SEE YOU IN HEAVEN!

Mealeta_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 5 years ago

 

As a former dispatcher, I have a great understanding and appreciation for dispatchers. I loved dispatching. It takes a special person to do the job without coming unglued on someone.

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Rate This | Posted almost 5 years ago

 

Thank you SO MUCH for posting that shplifeline...it is so FAR & few

between...that we hear such encouragement & appreciation for what

we do & it is TRUELY refreshing...thank you ;-)

Kbrownpatch_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 5 years ago

 

Very few dispatchers ever get a true "Thank you".  I've made it a point to regularly thank the dispatchers where I work for all they do.  Many times, they don't find out how things end after they get off the phone, and dealing with the stresses they deal with is difficult.  All it takes is a simple "Thank you", some kind words (and yes, even a thing of brownies/cookies!) to brighten their day.


So from one officer to those 911 Warriors, Thank you for everything you do to keep us ALL safe!

Photo_user_blank_big

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Rate This | Posted almost 5 years ago

 

WOW..............


IT IS GOOD TO BE APPRECIATED.  A DISPATCHERS JOB IS NEVER IN VAIN.

Troublewithtribbles_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 5 years ago

 

We aren't in it for the thank yous but every once in awhile its nice to hear, especially after "one of those days...night...shifts"....so thanks to the ones that keep us in their thoughts....


Great danger lies in the notion that we can reason with evil.

Evil is powerless if the good are unafraid. - President Ronald Reagan

"You didn't think we give pretty women tickets? You're right, we don't...... press hard maam there are 3 copies."

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Rate This | Posted over 1 year ago

 

THIS IS SOOOO MUCH APPRECIATED!! SO OFTEN WE DISPATCHERS DONT GET TOLD THANK YOU ENOUGH!!


 

Photo_user_blank_big

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Rate This | Posted over 1 year ago

 

soo sorry for using all caps .... didnt mean to do that


 

Quickley-b240_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 1 year ago

 

newofficer2be says ...



THIS IS SOOOO MUCH APPRECIATED!! SO OFTEN WE DISPATCHERS DONT GET TOLD THANK YOU ENOUGH!!


 



02/04/13


that took some doing to drag out a 4 year old thread.


you are a dispatcher but soon to be a new officer???


"The hottest places in hell are reserved for those who, in times of moral crisis, do nothing." Dante

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