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Professional Courtesy

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New-patch_max50

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Posted about 7 years ago

 

I have seen and heard many a debate about this subject. Let's get one going here. What's your opinion about giving a fellow officer some Professional Courtesy?

Deadliftskeleton_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

Well that depends,,, we have done so for many years to a point. The point being citizen safety, if you are speeding, you get a warning, if you are DUI no such luck. Of course, here in Ohio we have the State Patrol, and at one point, there was a little war going on since they cited one of our patrols. After that, it was game on. The primary difference is our tickets are federal theirs are civil. The Judges got together and put an end to it rather quickly.

Overall I agree, after all I will stop and do a check on any officer on a stop, regardless of what PD they belong to. If we dont look out for each other who will?

Rappellling_bank_tower_011_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

I have no problem with professional courtesy but with that being said it should not be abused either. If what they are doing is putting others at risk ie: DUI , they are on their own. I have met some who think they are above any laws and I do not agree! But for the most part I have no problem extending professional courtesy to a fellow officer.

Ashley_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

I agree. I've pulled over officers and once they produced their creds, they were free to go. Of course if it were a criminal act, as opposed to basic traffic violations, there would be a problem. I've been pulled over as well, and greatly appreciated, not only the courtesy, but the general attitude of a united law enforcement family.

Weinblattmsnbc_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

Ashley is right. Professional courtesy in my mind has to do with how professionally the officer or deputy I pull over handles him or herself. I have pulled over many officers and the idea is to handle yourself in a professional manner that makes the "stopper" want to give the "stopee" a break.

Goboat1_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

Professional courtesy, IMHO, isn't limited to just law enforcement. I sometimes have a heavy foot, but have been given profesisonal courtesy (as a civilian) because the officers know me, they know I am not a criminal, they know I was just trying to get from Point A to Point B in a hurry, but without intent of breaking the law. Sometimes my mind is on a hundred things at once, and while I'm careful and observant to the road and other drivers, obeying the speed limit hasn't always been at the top of the list. We, as civilians, appreciate it when we're given a break or a warning, so in my opinion, if they give other officers a break because of speeding, I have no complaint about that. If an officer that I am not familiar with pulled me over (and this happened on one occasion), he issued me a minimal citation. I disagreed with the ticket, but respectfully accepted it and the fact that he was doing his job. Ashley gets my thumb's up, too.

Jim_head2_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

Law enforcement to a large extent is discretionary. Police Officers are trusted with enforcing the law in a fair and unbiased way. Our job is to modify the behavior of the motoring pubic so that they obey the rules of the road. Having said that, issuing a ticket for a traffic violation isn’t always the best course of action. A verbal warning, also known as giving someone a break, is very effective in getting the point across. It is safe to say that far more warnings are given then citations issued. My mind is never made up until I approach the vehicle and talk to the driver. Their attitude dictates my response. If I get attitude from them, they get a ticket. If we have a civil discussion over the violation, they get a break. I am more lenient on police officers, doctors, nurses, school teachers and firemen. I have a zero tolerance policy for defense attorneys driving a car worth more than my house.

Blue2_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

Professional courtesy, is a fact of life. And happens in all job's, not just law enforcement. In the city I was in, Camden,NJ, we had very little time for traffic enforcement; which seems to be the most inter-agency contact mode. I recall having stopped a auto one night for some small infraction, turns out the guy had FTA (traffic) warrants on him. I took him in, during the ride in he says, "You know thats weird, I thought they did a full back ground check, on you." I said "What did you say." He repeated what he had just said. I questionably asked him, "Background check for what?" He said "The police department," "What department?" He said a small town that bordered our city. I said "why didn't you tell me you were a cop?" "I didn't think I had any warrants." Long story short I had to take the guy in, I all ready had him in my car, and cuffed, and advised dispatch I was in route to booking. The guy was out on an "OR" in a flash. But for the next few weeks I was berated endlessly by my fellow officers as an "A-Hole." For having locked up another cop.
The cop was not mad, just surprised, I was OK with it, in that he never said anything to me. But my fellow officers saw me as some sort of a idiot. Bottom line, I always gave another cop some Professional Courtesy, as long as it was not criminal. As I would hope someone would do that for me.
On a closing note, the one officer who stopped me down here in Florida, when I was in uniform, and on my way to work, was the classic cop who would give "HIS MOTHER" a ticket. I was doing 40 in a 30 MPH zone, showed him my Lifetime FOP Card, but still got the ticket, with a "NO ONE IS ABOVE THE LAW!"

702928025505_0_alb_max50

361 posts

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

I don't have a problem with professional courtesy. I have had excellent experiences with out of state police officers after being pulled over. I was in the wrong, speeding and I was given a warning. I don't expect it as no one really should but once again it is nice to have discretion.

Scan0001_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

I agree that a courtesy should be shown only to those officers who conduct themselves PROFESSIONALLY during a stop. I once stopped a deputy when I was fresh out of the academy and I have to say that he didn't act professional, let alone respect me. I stopped him and immediatley, before I could get out of my car, he walked to and stopped at mry car door. Not knowing who he was I took a defensive stance towards him. He then proceeded, without prompt, to whip out his CC and hold it in my face. Disgusted, I let him go( but later realized I should have written him). I was still in a state of shock after the stop, that he would be so arrogant as to do what he had done. Never again! Professional courtesy is for officers who act professional and conduct themselves like they deserve the badge, not the ones who take it for granted that its shown every time and show no respect.

Mvc-002f_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

Proffesional courtesy is based on extending a courtesy to a PROFESSIONAL. If you place yourself in a position to need a this courtesy because you EXPECT it or feel that it is owed to you then you are violating the ethics of the profession.

Ptpd_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

I agree with ltdeputy, Professional Courtesy is based on extending the courtesy to a Professional. I have extended courtesy to Officers through the years for minor traffic violations. I did not appreciate extending the courtesy to someone who expected it be done and then did not appreciate that the courtesy was extended. We are all brothers and sisters out there working toward the same mission. We should treat each other with the respect we would like to be treated with.

Photo_user_blank_big

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

I have no problem with professional courtesy for traffic violations, but nothing gets under my skin more than being handed a badge when I ask for a license. Don't demand a break from me and you'll most likely get one. I understand this is how it's done some places, but that's not the culture where I work.

Around here, the subtle "My off duty gun is on my right hip" gets you much farther than flashing a badge and telling me you're in a hurry.

Us_af_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

Professional courtesy goes a long way in most areas. That being said we have a Reserve Deputy in town that is never stopped or given a ticket for the simple fact that he grew up here and his dad is on the force. He drives his motorcycle through town (25 mph) doing about 50 or more and 'popping wheelies'. No one has yet stopped him. This individual also thinks that since he works at the Detention Center and is a Reserve Deputy that it is his god-given right to do whatever. I feel that if you have this type of attitude when you are not in your own town that you deserve to be given a ticket and not just a warning. I also feel that too much leniency is not good for public relations: Why stop me if I am doing the same thing as this other person?

Photo_user_blank_big

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

My opinion is this: I am a professional police officer. I expect other police officers to be professional too - both on and off duty. My position on professional courtesy is - don't put me, as a professional police officer, in the position to have to take enforcement action on another police officer. Just obey the same laws you swore to enforce. Law Enforcement gets a lot of "black-eyes" because officers do stupid or inappropriate things. Why add cover-up to it? If the general public gets cited or arrested, then officers should too. I believe that an officer that lets another officer go, when he would arrest or cite a regular citizen for doing the same thing that he caught the officer doing, is dishonest and unethical and should find something else to do for a living.

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

I believe Discretion is the better part of Valor.

Kju_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

My personal feeling is that these are my fellow brothers in lawenforcement. It is my job as well as theirs to make sure that the relationships that we build stay intact. The things police officers are hired for is for their decision making and common sence. I know that if i ever need help it just might be that officer who is coming to help me. Now that being said if it is just some little citation that is one thing. If a crime is being committed.....sorry brother those are the laws i have sworn to protect.!!!!

Photo_user_blank_big

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

I do believe Trooper up above graduated from the Ohio State Highway Patrol. To re-hash what has already been said, professional courtesy goes both ways in many different professions. In my patrol car, it has been extended to prosecuting attorneys, sgts., cop's kids, etc. I will take a lot more crap from a cop's kid than I will from an ordinary citizen, but I guarantee the parent will hear about it. I have had fellow officers give me their blessing to cite their kids. That not-withstanding, I have to admit, that I do have a leadfoot. Trying to get home so I can see my kids or get a couple of hours of sleep before I head back downtown for court tends make me want to drive faster (gee, go figure). Nobody's above the law, and nobody should expect a break as a given, but come on...if we don't take care of each other, who will????? Just a thought (or two)

Police67_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

I think I have to agree with Mitch826. Ive been in Law Enforcement for 8 years. Ive extended alot of breaks to people. Other Officers that are profesional get trated just the same way. You never know, that night your fighting on a lonely dark road with no back up, a off duty officer may be your saving grace.....And par for the course, as your getting wheeled thru the E.R. and the Nurse you wrote a ticket to is standing over you....I'd be willing to bet a order for the biggest needles in the hospital are being written for you.

Photo_user_blank_big

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

Is there one among us who hasn't given an ordinary citizen a break? If we give those outside our profession a break on a traffic violation, why on earth shouldn't we give each other a break!!!?????? As for TROOPER, what state did you say you work for???? :)

Photo_user_blank_big

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

It is just speeding. Think about this. I am an LEO. Expecting a break, I am speeding on any one of our nations streets or highways. I meet Deputy Sheriff, Police Officer or State Trooper, who gives pursuit. Deputy Sheriff, Police Officer or State Trooper gets involved in an automobile collision, trying to overtake a speeding off-duty LEO. I work one of our nations interstates five days a week. This happens on a regular basis. Off duty LEOs, intentionally speeding, expecting a break. For those who don’t work traffic, here is how it works. You get clocked. If the enforcement officer was moving when he met you, he/she must 1) hit the median, 2)flip around into on-coming traffic, and 3)overtake you. It is not much different from the stationary mode. Patrol cars get torn up on a regular basis, flipping around in the media. Thanks for getting me written up for damaging my patrol car. Have you ever had to merge, from a dead stop, into traffic running 70, 80, 90 plus miles per hour. An accident at this moment would be fatal. From a dead stop, the speeds traveled to overtake the speeding off-duty LEO, expecting a break, would destroy a patrol car and cause severe injury or death if involved in an accident. How about being the reason a LEO was killed in the line of duty. I am sure there are many family members out there that would greatly appreciate you not putting there loved ones in any more danger than we already face.

Photo_user_blank_big

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

Absoluteky. Everything else has been taken from us. All we have left is our ability to take care of each other and our families.
The mindset that some officers have now is totaly foreign to me. I can think of almost no reason not take care of our own.

Photo_user_blank_big

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

I have noticed over the years that those who take a hard line and are willing to hurt another officer are dirty and hope that people won't notice thier improprieties if the put someone else in the jackpot.

Photo_user_blank_big

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

My response to some of the other posts is this: Why do the officers who are out there doing the RIGHT THING, by fairly and ethically enforcing the laws they swore to uphold, always have to be defending themselves from the attacks and criticism from other officers who are breaking the law? The problem is not with the officers who are writing the warnings or citations - it is with the officers who are violating the laws!!! Stop using your professional position for personnal gain, or go flip burgers or pump gas for a living. And to those who would not provide assistance to another officer just because he or she gave them a ticket - YOU ARE A COWARD - FIND ANOTHER PROFESSION!!!

Ltsh1_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

TROOPER states "If the general public gets cited or arrested, then officers should too. I believe that an officer that lets another officer go, when he would arrest or cite a regular citizen for doing the same thing that he caught the officer doing, is dishonest and unethical and should find something else to do for a living".

Let me guess........You must work in Virginia!! Cops don't write cop's, end of story..I let 99 percent of civilians go with a warning, I would never think of writing another cop. Dont take everything so seriously Lighten up and have a drink.

1460209889_m_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

In response to Trooper,,As most of the of the other comment state,,If we dont take care each other,,,WHO WILL?? Do you think the common criminal will or the common citizens that ''JUST DONT WANT TO GET INVOLVED''. You wont ever catch me writing another " professional " officer for a minor traffic violation, as I dont write everyone I stop.( Now if you write everyone you stop a ticket,,read on.) On the other hand if they are, lets say, 60 in a 35 or DUI or a felony, then they will get the same treatment as anybody else. When I began working in this family I started in corrections. My warden came in to speak to us in oriontation and in just a few minutes he changed my thinking process to this day. He asked the class " If a man walked into a bank, handed the teller a non-aggressive robbery note, and left with $400.00, Is he a criminal?? We all agreed yes!! He said ok,,,now that same man ( who lost his job a week ago ), leaves the bank and goes strait to a pharmacy and buys medicine( that cost $398.99 ) for his very ill child,,is he still a criminal??? Nobody answered yes or no. As the moral of the story goes, not everybody is a criminal and not everybody deserves a ticket.


Mercy to the guilty is cruelty to the innocent. .

1460209889_m_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

I completely agree with Ijmac787 on both comments


Mercy to the guilty is cruelty to the innocent. .

Policelinkbadge_max160_max160_max30_1__max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

I agree whole heartedly. I have received professional courtesy and i have given it many times. But if its a criminal act such as drunk driving or something else, i would do my job regardless of who the person was.

Ltsh1_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

If you pull over an off-duty LEO who may be DWI............Drive him home. I've done it numerous times. Why lock him up?

1460209889_m_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

If he/she is borderline DUI maybe, But if he/she is so intoxicated that a civilian would know better..........Besides my and most departments have policies against riders unless they are under arrest. What if he/she is from another jurisdiction and its too far away? You cant leave the city. What are you going to do with the vehicle? Some cities you cant just leave it, cause it sure wont be there when they come back to get it. I can understand a MINOR traffic violation, but total disregard for them self, the safety of the people they swore to protect, and total disregard for the law. It would depend mostly on attitude and availability on a ride home. His higher chain of command would be notified to be sure that he/she knew the courtesy was a one time favor. Luckily I have not been in that situation. Any additional input may help my judgment if the situation ( God forbid ) ever arises.


Mercy to the guilty is cruelty to the innocent. .

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