Law Enforcement Specialties >> Special Units (K9, SWAT, etc.) >> Special Operations Divisions and Medics

+1

Special Operations Divisions and Medics

230 Views
16 Replies Flag as inappropriate

-380 posts

back to top

Posted almost 6 years ago

 

Im curious, you officers, deputies, and troopers who are assigned to special units such as warrants (either criminal or mental), SRT, narcotics, vice, fugitive recovery, etc etc.....does your division require one or a certain amout of officers trained as medics (CLS, EMT-B/I/P) etc etc?


 

-380 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted almost 6 years ago

 

bump


 

Th_germanshepard_max50

1941 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted almost 6 years ago

 

Several of the Troopers assigned to SWAT are EMT's. When on a call, we also have a volunteer surgeon that travels with us. He specializes in trauma care and ER tactics.


Beyond fatigue lies compensatory hypertrophy

Usmc_max50

3224 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted almost 6 years ago

 

Most of ours are EMT and Combat Medic qual'd. EMT is the standard and required to get on the team.


Happiness is a belt fed weapon.
Great danger lies in the notion that we can reason with evil.

-380 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted almost 6 years ago

 

Taffy says ...



Most of ours are EMT and Combat Medic qual'd. EMT is the standard and required to get on the team.



EMT quals for every officer on the team you mean? To what level, B? I? P?

-451 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted almost 6 years ago

 

there was a police paramedic program around here a few years ago, but I dont know what happened to it.

Usmc_max50

3224 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted almost 6 years ago

 

Basic. Then some are selected for Combat Medic training with the Navy Corpsmen assigned to the FMF at Camp Pendleton.


Happiness is a belt fed weapon.
Great danger lies in the notion that we can reason with evil.

-380 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted almost 6 years ago

 

Taffy says ...



Basic. Then some are selected for Combat Medic training with the Navy Corpsmen assigned to the FMF at Camp Pendleton.



Are we talking military police here or civilian police?

Usmc_max50

3224 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted almost 6 years ago

 

Federal.


Happiness is a belt fed weapon.
Great danger lies in the notion that we can reason with evil.

-380 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted almost 6 years ago

 

Taffy says ...



Federal.



That is one thing I would like to see more, law enforcement making use of the experience of the military. In the states, the National Guard has the role of supporting civil authority....I dont know why more departments donr make use of the Guard and or the federal military. The military is a WEALTH of knowledge right now, after 7 years of constant warfare.....knowledge of terrorist TTPs, tactical medicine, MOUT/CQB, etc etc.


 

003_max50

88 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted almost 6 years ago

 

All of our officers are EMT cert. If you are on the SWAT team then you get some more advanced training.

Usmc_max50

3224 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted almost 6 years ago

 

PSDTeamLeader says ...



Taffy says ...



Federal.



That is one thing I would like to see more, law enforcement making use of the experience of the military. In the states, the National Guard has the role of supporting civil authority....I dont know why more departments donr make use of the Guard and or the federal military. The military is a WEALTH of knowledge right now, after 7 years of constant warfare.....knowledge of terrorist TTPs, tactical medicine, MOUT/CQB, etc etc.


 



I'll second that. Learn from those that KNOW. Good plan.


Happiness is a belt fed weapon.
Great danger lies in the notion that we can reason with evil.

-380 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted almost 6 years ago

 

Taffy says ...



PSDTeamLeader says ...



Taffy says ...



Federal.



That is one thing I would like to see more, law enforcement making use of the experience of the military. In the states, the National Guard has the role of supporting civil authority....I dont know why more departments donr make use of the Guard and or the federal military. The military is a WEALTH of knowledge right now, after 7 years of constant warfare.....knowledge of terrorist TTPs, tactical medicine, MOUT/CQB, etc etc.


 



I'll second that. Learn from those that KNOW. Good plan.



I blame my fellow veterans for not having more of this. All the cops who have served in the 5 branches should be blowing up the ears of supervisors, chiefs, constables, and sheriffs about some exchange training. The guys who havnt been in, they dont know. Its the guys who have who should be submitting paperwork and making contacts at local Guard armories.

-380 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted almost 6 years ago

 


Army Halts Use of New First Aid Item

 

December 23, 2008
Associated Press
<!-- Uncomment this when the Jive comments functionality is available
<span class="comments art1199421204127">
</span>
-->

<!-- quick fix for IE6&7 render bug where duplicate word being added. hasLayout-related-->

WASHINGTON - Until more testing can be done, U.S. Army medics are being told to stop using a new product just sent to the war front to help control bleeding among wounded troops.


Officials were in the process of distributing some 17,000 packets of WoundStat, granules that are poured into wounds when special bandages, tourniquets or other efforts won't work. But a recent study showed that, if used directly on injured blood vessels, the granules may lead to harmful blood clots, officials said Tuesday.


The Army Medical Command will continue its research and work with the manufacturer in hopes of figuring out in the next few months whether to resume use of WoundStat, said Col. Paul Cordts, head of Army health policy and services.


WoundStat manufacturer TraumaCure, Inc. had no immediate comment.


The product had been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. It was one of the latest in a series of Army efforts to improve survival rates on the battlefield.


Today, 90 percent of injured troops survive their wounds, the highest rate of any war, Cordts said in an interview. He credited better training of combat medics, better body armor the troops wear and better tactics they use on the battlefield, as well improved bandages, tourniquets and so on.


Defense Department figures show that as of this month, more than 4,800 troops have been killed in Iraq and fighting terrorism. The latter category counts casualties mostly from Afghanistan. Some 34,000 troops have been wounded in the wars, where insurgents have made wide use of roadside bombs and other explosives.


Excessive blood loss is the number one killer on the battlefield, and the Army announced in October that it was sending two potential lifesavers - the WoundStat packets and a bandage called Combat Gauze - to replace older other products that had been in use at the time.


A committee of Army medics, Navy corpsmen, surgeons and others recommended the Combat Gauze bandage - which has an agent that triggers blood clotting - should be the first-line treatment for life-threatening hemorrhaging in cases where a tourniquet could not be placed, such as the armpit or groin area.


The WoundStat granules were to be used if the bandage failed to work.


Cordts said the Army put out a message on Dec. 18, directing the temporary halt in use of WoundStat. Though it has arrived at the war zones, officials are unclear on how widely it has been distributed so far. They're working to identify any soldiers who got the treatment, study their cases and examine them for any problems with blood clotting, Cordts said.


He said he did not know whether it had been used on any soldiers and thus had no reports back from the field - positive or negative - on how effective it might have been.


Cordts said that after an additional few months of study, officials will likely determine whether they should discontinue its use altogether or perhaps redistribute it with warnings for how it is to be used.

Usmc_max50

3224 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted almost 6 years ago

 

PSD_Team_Leader says ...



Taffy says ...



PSDTeamLeader says ...



Taffy says ...



Federal.



That is one thing I would like to see more, law enforcement making use of the experience of the military. In the states, the National Guard has the role of supporting civil authority....I dont know why more departments donr make use of the Guard and or the federal military. The military is a WEALTH of knowledge right now, after 7 years of constant warfare.....knowledge of terrorist TTPs, tactical medicine, MOUT/CQB, etc etc.


 



I'll second that. Learn from those that KNOW. Good plan.



I blame my fellow veterans for not having more of this. All the cops who have served in the 5 branches should be blowing up the ears of supervisors, chiefs, constables, and sheriffs about some exchange training. The guys who havnt been in, they dont know. Its the guys who have who should be submitting paperwork and making contacts at local Guard armories.



I have to agree there. Knowledge is power and with budgets getting slashed across the board there has to be a means to fill the vacuum on training for the eventual terror attacks in the States. Veterans bring a huge and valuable resource in potential experience and training. Sounding off and preaching the gospel to Department leadership has to start happening a lot more. It is happening, but the pace seems to be rather slow. At the same time, Departments have to recognize what experience their Officers have and make an effort to tape that potential. The level of training our Medics get from the Navy Corpsmen is built around the experience they got on the ground in Iraq and in Afghanistan. You can't beat that kind of training in an LE enviornment. Prep for IEDs and the kind of tactics we saw in Mumbai is essential to a successful Police and SWAT response to those kinds of attacks when they start here. We in Federal LE are doing this already, but I am seeing more of it in LE as word spreads. This is critical training, the time to get it is now, and it is available if we ask for it.  


Happiness is a belt fed weapon.
Great danger lies in the notion that we can reason with evil.

-380 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted almost 6 years ago

 

Taffy says ...



PSD_Team_Leader says ...



Taffy says ...



PSDTeamLeader says ...



Taffy says ...



Federal.



That is one thing I would like to see more, law enforcement making use of the experience of the military. In the states, the National Guard has the role of supporting civil authority....I dont know why more departments donr make use of the Guard and or the federal military. The military is a WEALTH of knowledge right now, after 7 years of constant warfare.....knowledge of terrorist TTPs, tactical medicine, MOUT/CQB, etc etc.


 



I'll second that. Learn from those that KNOW. Good plan.



I blame my fellow veterans for not having more of this. All the cops who have served in the 5 branches should be blowing up the ears of supervisors, chiefs, constables, and sheriffs about some exchange training. The guys who havnt been in, they dont know. Its the guys who have who should be submitting paperwork and making contacts at local Guard armories.



I have to agree there. Knowledge is power and with budgets getting slashed across the board there has to be a means to fill the vacuum on training for the eventual terror attacks in the States. Veterans bring a huge and valuable resource in potential experience and training. Sounding off and preaching the gospel to Department leadership has to start happening a lot more. It is happening, but the pace seems to be rather slow. At the same time, Departments have to recognize what experience their Officers have and make an effort to tape that potential. The level of training our Medics get from the Navy Corpsmen is built around the experience they got on the ground in Iraq and in Afghanistan. You can't beat that kind of training in an LE enviornment. Prep for IEDs and the kind of tactics we saw in Mumbai is essential to a successful Police and SWAT response to those kinds of attacks when they start here. We in Federal LE are doing this already, but I am seeing more of it in LE as word spreads. This is critical training, the time to get it is now, and it is available if we ask for it.  



Couldnt have said it better myself. Guys with boots on the ground experience fighting terrorists, familiar with current terrorist TTPs, have tactical knowledge in firearms and medicine do indeed bring a wealth of experience, knowledge...and most importantly imagination to their departments.


The resource of using the military for aid to law enforcement should be something every last police department in America uses.