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Police Officers & Dispatchers

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Me_max50

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Posted about 7 years ago

 

I have been a Police dispatcher for almost 4 years. The relationship that I had with the officers were that of a friendly one, of course, but I wonder what officers really think of their dispatchers knowing that the majority of us dispatchers are not sworn officers.


"Help me today to be a help and example to all. To bring strength and encourgement wherever I am, Through Jesus Christ my Savior, Amen

Ltsh1_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

They have a stressfull job and are very much appreciated here in New York. When the $hit hits the fan they usually remain calm and do an outstanding job. It's very rarely said, but thanks for all you do.

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

I have been a Police Dispatcher for almost 11 years now. I will be the first to tell ya , I look after everyone of my guys.. We have three sides of town and when I am working I am paying attention to all of them. I want my guys to go home just as much as they do to.. My dad was an officers back in 92 and I now know what it is like for him not to come home. (was killed by drunk driver while on duty). I do my best at all times and give 110%. Not that I am bragging.. but if you ask any officer here they will tell you I am very good at what I do .. I take pride in my job and I am very passionate about it. My relationship with the officers.. simple .. we are all family .. we take care of each other.. and thanks NYPDLieutenant for your comment.. it means alot to us.. You are right.. we dont get thanked enough.. I think I speak for all dispathcers... so to all my fellow dispathcers out there. ..Thanks for all that yall (we) do .. keep up the good work .. I know that our officers appreciate us... ;)

Img_3413_sq90_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

sweetpea I am sorry for your loss. While it was not a family member I too have had someone I care about killed by a drunk driver. In addition within the last two years we came close to losing two oficers by drunk drivers...one intentionally ran Nicole down. I too want to thank all you dispatchers for keeping my guys and gals safe by knowing where they are and hearing them call for backup and knowing their locations.

Misty_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

Once a dispatcher and now an officer...I know first hand both sides of the fence. I can say that as an officer...we appreciate our dispatchers. They are our life line and get our back up to us in an emergency. I know that if it hadn't been for my dispatcher on May 3, 2007, I probably wouldn't have walked away from an alteration/fight with a suspect high on crack. She heard me and got me the help I needed. With the exception of OC exposure and a few bruises, I walked away, The criminal on the other hand could barely walk and had a busted lip. I also know how a dispatcher feels about her officers. Even though dispatchers are not sworn...they are still our brothers and sisters and have our back and for that we are appreciative. Keep up the great work!

Photo_user_banned_big

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

Having worked as security and police, I have had some of the best dispatchers (thanks, RoseMary, where ever you are these days), and some of the worst (got forgotten on a mark-out on an open door on at empty residence; I had told my dispatcher that if she didn't hear from me within 10 min (our hand-helds sucked so I wouldn't be able to get out on the air from inside the structure and would have to clear from the car), to send cover from the Sheriff's Dept. I forgot to clear... 45 minutes later when I was LONG down the road and realized it, I cleared. Her only response was, "Sorry, 914. I forgot." Obviously didn't have her head in the job. My better half dispatches for the P.D. in a suburb a couple of towns over... I've heard her on the radio and on the phone under some high-stress situations (she even walked a guy through delivering his own child over the phone before the medics got there). She feels unappriciated often, but I always tell her, if I'd had her on the other end of the radio throughout my years, life would've been SO much easier. A sincere "thanks" to ALL OF YOU who are dedicated to your jobs; I don't know firsthand, but I know the pain you feel when you hear a tight fix on the other end of the line and there's nothing you can do but pray, and the joy you feel in a situation as described with the childbirth above, but above all, I know you're the LIFELINE. "It's good to be in good with God, and it's great to be in good with God AND your dispatcher, but if you're not in good with your dispatcher, you'd better be in REALLY good with God!" May He Bless you all. Keep up the great job.

Michael_pic_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

I'm not a police officer yet but trust me I keep track of what goes on and I am very thank full 4 every-thing you all do because I know when I get out there I will get all the help I need.

Photo_user_banned_big

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

MPLinks: It's an upright goal, pursue your heart.


In like manner the spirit also joins in with help for our weakness, for the problem of what we should pray for as we need to we do not know but the spirit itself pleads for us with groanings uttered.

No man serving as a soldier involves himself in the commercial businesses of life, in order that he may gain the approval of the one who enrolled him as a soldier. 5. Moreover, if anyone conten

Me_max50

48 posts

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

I was a dispatcher for college police for almost 3 years. That is where I learned how to dispatch. I was never put through formal training. I trained myself. As a matter of fact the police department was finally recognized as such three months after I started dispatching there. I was not paid by the college, I was paid by a security company that the college had a contract with. None of the dispatchers were trained. We were all basically thrown in a chair and told to learn the codes and here is the radio. Although I always took my job seriously, I started looking at things differently even more seriously when the police officers were hired on. After about a year of asking to be sent to training I finally put myself through POST dispatching school for three weeks without pay. The police officers have always told me that I was an excellent dispatcher for not having any training. I just wanted to make sure that I was doing all I could to make sure they went home at night. After dispatching for the college for almost three years and getting paid a little higher than minimum wage and working with no benefits, I decided it was time to move on. Of course I cried when I left because I knew that I was putting the officers at risk. The only training that the other dispatchers received was from me. Lord knows I had no business training them. However, I had to look out for myself and my kids. I still today wonder if my leaving was selfish. Now I dispatch for the county police with better pay and better benefits than I thought I would get.


"Help me today to be a help and example to all. To bring strength and encourgement wherever I am, Through Jesus Christ my Savior, Amen

100_1981_3__max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

I was a dispatcher before I became a police officer. I have much respect for dispatchers. It is a very demanding job that few people are able to perform successfully.


"It would be better for one to have a stone tied around their neck and thrown into the sea, than to cause a child to stumble."

"Well-behaved women rarely make history"

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

No offense to anyone here, but my dispatchers are the biggest bunch of idiots I have ever seen. They don't relay accurate information from the complainant ( the correct color of a stolen vehicle), they hold "in progress" calls (burglary) until the Deputy from that sector finishes a trespass notification, even though there are several other units in service, and they lose hard copies of warrants.

This was just today!

Sorry...this thread came on the wrong day for me.

Img_1129_max50

117 posts

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

I have to say that 99% of the dispatchers I have worked with or know are top shelf people. True professionals, but there are the 1%'ers that are idiots. Some get very rude and act as if the officer answers to them in the chain of command.
I have listened to some heated arguments on the air btw dispatcher and officer over some trivial matters all the way up to critical ones. It comes down to where you are and what you need from the people who work the air waves and computers for you. I am lucky in that I along with all the other Border Patrol agents and Customs Officers have and outstanding sector on the console.
The San Diego Sheriff's Department dispatchers have a horrible rap and the two sides hate each other. I know, it was my first department. Several off duty incidents at LEO functions have led to fights once booze is added. All in all, it is a hard job that is not one I can honestly say I could do. My hats are off to the true professionals who care about my hide out and about on the rode.

1z6tp9w_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

when I worked for the sheriff dept and i had to aske the dipatchers were nice. but the ones for countys were not so nice. i just guess it depends on the person. but, I was thankfull for them caues if i was lost they helped me find my way. THANK YOU TO ALL DISPATCHERS : > )

603027000639_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

the dispatchers I deal with are top notch. At least I treat them that way because god only knows the day when the shit hits the fan, will be the day they will probably save my life. It goes to say that its not the officer that saves your life, its the dispatcher who is the one ultimately responsible for that. So, hug your dispatcher if you can, I have a couple of times. You know, come to think of it...is there such a thing s "Hug A Dispatcher Day" anywhere??

Me_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

GTS197....I'm sorry to hear about your unfortunate situation with your dispatchers. Maybe the suggestion to retrain them might help or even put them through a public relations course. It is b/c of dispatchers like that who make the rest of us look like crap. I have found officers who have come from a department with dispatchers such as yours have a hard time trusting their current dispatchers which makes it hard and frustrating for not only the officer but the dispatcher too. Good luck and be careful. My prayers are with you


"Help me today to be a help and example to all. To bring strength and encourgement wherever I am, Through Jesus Christ my Savior, Amen

Liz_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

Having been a police dispatcher for a large department, St Louis MO, for several years before moving on to an officer, I know that the job is demanding and stressful. I appreciate anyone that is willing to do the job right. However this is not just a job that you can throw anyone into. Now I work for a smaller department and we have hired some questionable people just to fill the slot so they don't have to pay overtime. We even caught one of our dipatchters notifying her brother( a drug dealer) when we were doing warrants.

Long story short is that I think that most officer will appreciate a dispather who is dedicated to thier job. Just like an officer, this is a job that is not suited for many people. Keep up the good work and remember that we are all one big family in the LE profession. Wheather or not you are commisioned is not an issue. I have had commisioned officers that filled in for the dispatchers and THEY could'nt keep up.

Ken__bike_patrol_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

I'm trained as a dispatcher as well as being a police officer, so I can speak freely. Most of the times, dispatchers are great, and very appreciated. However...here's a couple ways dispatchers can really upset me: 1) Just say "OK", because you didn't really hear what I said 2) Not answer me, because you were talking to somebody in the dispatch room and weren't really paying attention 3) Don't do what I asked, because you didn't write it down, and forgot about it 4) Copy me on a car stop, and then, when I call for backup, ask me where I am. There's no shame in asking cops to repeat things, or confirm things, if you didn't hear it. We NEED you!!

17_2007_337_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

Famous words from my sarg. during my training.....DO not get on the bad side of a dispatcher!.words to live by! they are the hub of the L E wheel.

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

I'm not down on dispatchers...just THESE dispatchers. My last agency, the dispatchers were top-shelf and I loved them to death. They were always looking out for us and were part of the "family". The ones I'm plaqued with now are more concerned with socializing and screwing around on the internet, when they should be focused on which officer is doing what, and where he's doing it at.

It's gotten to the point that when one of us checks out on traffic or on a call, the other officers pay attention to what's going on and act accordingly. We simply don't trust them.

101_abn_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

I am currently in the interviewing stage of an opening in our Offices' dispatch section. I would warmly welcome ANY tips, hints, gripes or anything that would help me understand your needs/likes/dislikes as in PAproud and GTS197's posts. I already understand the critical importance of this position , it's gonna be a handful if I get the position, I know, but I'll either be good or I'll go back to my job now(Corrections). Any tips?, I'm going to print it all out and put it at my desk should I get the job. Stay Safe All!!

Img_3413_sq90_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

In our area we have good dispatchers and bad dispatchers...sad to say in our area many of the bad ones are women. They tend to snap at the oficers for no reason, they don't always put down where you are (as a civilian employee I went to see a victim whose boyfriend tried to kill her. He had not been caught yet and so when I told the dispatcher my location I also told her that if I got on the radio it was because he showed up and we needed officers at that location yesterday. She told me of "course, I'll even make a special note." When I cleared the job the dispatcher could not even find the job! Another time a victim called me when her son broke into her house. I called 911 for a family problem/ burglary in progress. When I called dispatch later to find out who responded they could not find the job. I had to call around until I found who got the job. Needless to say the responding officer was NOT thrilled that there was no job showing where he and his backup went to what could have been a very violent call. I have many stories that i could list but I won't:-). I do have to say though that most of the dispatchers are good. All I ask is to pay attention to the officers calling out their location, type of job, etc. If they don't respond to you checking on them don't blow it off, keep trying to raise them and send someone to check on them and again, THANKS for keeping an eye on them. They need you.

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

Ok Pappy, here's a short quiz...

Let's say you're about to send an officer on a domestic disturbance call and you have a crying female on the phone talking to you, claiming that her husband/boyfriend assaulted her.

What questions do you think you should ask the victim?

Erics_boat2_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

Dont know how they do it. Been a cop for 10 years and there is noway I would want to dispatch even for a day. Very demanding multi-tasking job. Most do very, very well with my dept.

101_abn_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

Good question GTS197, give me your feedback. I don't even know if I'll have the right aptitude for this job, but, I do want to be more "forward" so to speak. After 21 + years of living with the best young men the country has to offer (Army Infantry)being surrounded by scumbags at the jail ain't cutting it. I do know domestic calls can be one of the most dangerous, I also know there are no written SOPs (something I've learned to put great stock in over the years)at our dispatch so one has no guideline or historically proven written framework within which to approach the wildly diverse situations I know I will run into day to day. I "dispatched" in Baghdad '04-'05 (known as TOC NCO military parlance) I realize every key of the mike or ring of the phone is potentially life and death, you and "TWO" now have me wondering, may all be "moot" anyway as I've not heard from the communications CPT

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

Dispatch is a job that not everyone can do, but neither is being a corrections/detention officer. I have no doubt that you would do a fine job and the purpose of my scenario above was to illustrate a point: If you were the officer going to that disturbance, what information would you like to know? It is a common sense approach that some people can't grasp (SOP aside, which will vary from agency to agency). Here are the things that I want to know prior to arriving on scene (each call will be different, but these are for the situation cited above).

1) Are weapons involved?
2) Who is the suspect and what's his description?
3) Is the suspect still on scene? If not, did he leave in a vehicle or on foot? Description of vehicle? Direction of travel?
4) Is anyone else in the house? Other possible victims?
5) Is medical attention needed?

These are just a few, but I think you see where I'm going. There have been many a time when a suspect had already departed, but due to dispatch asking the right questions and relaying the information to me, was able to identify the suspect either walking, or driving out of the neighborhood and detain him prior to ever speaking with the victim. Weapons involvement greatly dictates how an officer will react once on scene. Remember, no two calls are ever the same and the officer needs to remain flexible and adapt to however the situation unfolds.

I wish you all the best!

101_abn_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

Thanks COPS1521 and GTS197, still waiting to hear if I got the job, hope I do. I'm gonna print all this out so I can review from time to time. Keep yer heads down!

Cpd_star_max50

110 posts

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

There's a crew of dispatchers that work here on 1st watch on zone 3 that I think are the best in the city. Their calm voices helps to calm us down during foot or car pursuits and shoot fired at the police. They do a great job.

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

I have nothing but respect for dispatchers. When I first started in law enforcement, I was told this little saying and I have never forgotten it: "You may know where you are and God may know where you are, but if your dispatcher doesn't know where you are, then you and God had better be on good terms!"
Keep up the good work and thanks for doing a super job!

Misty_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

Kudos go out to the dispatchers in my city working Friday morning June 8, 2007 at 0341hrs. I came upon a suspicious vehicle and my dispatcher notified me immmediately, before I approached, that the vehicle was stolen out of another city. She also dispatched back up before I got a chance to ask for it. Way to go! Then she knew when I said...I got him, but he's struggling...that I needed the 10-13 right then and called it for me. After getting the suspect in custody and clearing the 10-13 she verified that I was OK. She did a wonderful job and I just wanted to let dispatchers know that they are appreciated.

Aa6e89f561d0434c9d5e491a4d740d38_1__max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

We have a special bond with our dispatchers. When we (Cops) have cook outs, we include of comminications officers as our own. They take care of us and we will not allow 911 callers harass or intimidate "Our Guy's & Gals". We are a force of "One". Alone, we are weak. We Love of Communications Personnel!!

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