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BEST WAY TO START FLYING??

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317_max50

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Posted about 6 years ago

 

HELLO ALL,


I AM CURRENTLY GOING THROUGH MY BACKROUND INVESTIGATION WITH THE COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE IN CALIFORNIA. I WOULD LIKE TO ONE DAY BECOME A PILOT FOR LAW ENFORCEMENT. WHAT IS THE BEST WAY TO GO AT THIS AND ABOUT HOW LONG DOES IT TAKE? I WOULD GREATLY APPRECIATE ANY ADVICE THAT CAN BE PROVIDED.


THANK YOU


DAVE KARNS

2152_2664_008_edited-1_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 6 years ago

 

 Best bet:  Go into the military OR pay out the nose for flight training (which will only give you about 300 - 500hrs).

Pic_004_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 6 years ago

 

Becoming a pilot is very affordable if you do some research and put forth a little effort.  Forget about high priced schools and instructors that get paid by the hour.  Some are only interested in the next money making flight.  I went out and found my own plane.  I bought a '61 Cessna 150A with around 4000 airframe hours and 100 hours engine time.  All I had to do was replace the transponder and I had the sweetest 2 seater in the area for only $17,000.  Next, find an instructor.  I found a guy who is a border patrol agent and instructor pilot.  I went all the way through to my private pilot checkride for only $350!!!  Every municipal airport has freelance instructors who are great pilots that give you personal instruction on YOUR time.  1 on 1 instructor time is more valuable than anything else when it comes to learning.   Airplanes are VERY affordable.  People think because it's a plane, it's expensive.  Well, it's not.  The expensive planes are the $68 million Boeing Business Jets or the $400,000 C172's with the G1000 glass cockpits.  Sure, you can learn to fly in a Cirrus SR-22 Turbo, but it has about $300,000 worth of stuff that you don't need.  Would you learn to drive in a Lamborghini Gallardo or an Impala?  Initial flight training is the most important step in learning to fly.  Do a little research and find what best suits YOU.  Money doesn't always buy the best in flight training.  What ever you choose to do....remember that safety trumps ALL in the air.

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Rate This | Posted over 5 years ago

 

Helicopters are significantly more expensive to rent than fixed-wing aircraft. It would be more cost effective to work in helicopters and fly fixed-wing recreationally. If you aren't rich and are not over 28ish (varies per service?), apply with the Army for helicopters; Navy, Air Force, or Marines for fixed-wing, generally. All the services have both, but the Army has more helicopters. Most branches of the military require a four year degree. The Army did not require one when I went through, but requirements change during war time, etc. The military pays you while you train and pays for training that would otherwise be very expensive. It may sound like I'm a military recruiter, but I'm not. The suggestion I just made came from a career helicopter pilot/mechanic that I asked 27 years ago. He said that even if you get your private pilot's license, no one can insure you to work for them with that little experience. It made sense to me. I came off active duty Army with 1800 flight hours. That is still shy of what some employers want, but the experience I had was in a civilian marketable helicopter (OH-58). The employer I applied with knew well of the training/reputation of a US Army Aeroscout Instructor Pilot. I have been flying helicopters now for 22 years, and destiny offered the opportunity to fly fixed-wing now for 7 years.

 


Some police agencies train police officers to be pilots, but a police officer who is already a pilot will save the department money if that officer is selected for the pilot position. It all comes down to how badly does someone want to fly? Some people would not hesitate in joining the military to realize the dream. Some people have taken out student loans. Some people piece together some ratings over many years, running into age issues without alot of experience. There is no time to procrastinate.

 


I don't think it matters what kind of flight school you go to? Larger schools may be more expensive, because they have higher overhead costs? Flight schools also hire instructors with low flight time (300 hours), pay them peanuts, because they know the new, young instructor is just glad to be flying. The newer instructors are supervised by a more experienced "Chief Pilot". Larger schools may, however, have a well established, solid curriculum. A good curriculum is necessary to train a safe pilot. Larger schools may include aviation programs at universities or the military. The US Army Aviation Center is the largest helicopter flight school in the world. You may find a freelance instructor that may be the perfect fit of experience and price. It may be helpful to ask aviation law enforcement officers in your area. They probably know of a reputable school or instructor? I hope my suggestions are helpful to anyone who wants to fly.

Dmed1_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 5 years ago

 

I'm in agreement with mfelcher 211. I got suckered into flight training with Silver State Helicopters here in Vegas. The $47,000.00 for initial training from private to CFI turned into $66,500.00. By the time its payed off its going to be $111,000.00.


The company went Bankrupt took all the money, now the bank is after me for the loan amount. I now have the worlds most expensive private pilots license. The bank and the school are under investigation for Fraud and being charged under RICO, BUT, this all could have been avoided if I had spent the time researching other options. I've had to file personal bankruptcy...the loan may or may not be discharged.


One on one, per flight hour type lessons are probably the best way to go. What ive learned from my personal pain, is ask questions. The most convenient isnt always the best.