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HOW DO YOU FILL OUT REPORTS?

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Me_and_partner_rex_max50

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Posted about 6 years ago

 

I would like to get your input on how your officers complete incident/police reports:


Do they write in the first person/third person?


Are they using police codes on the report?


Computer or hand written?


If you use a computer is there a hard copy printed/signed and filed?


Is your records clerk a sworn or unsworn person?


Who reviews the report Shift Supervisor/Shift Commander/Chief?


Is there one standard report or do individual units have thier own specific incident report to complete?


How many days before reports are available?


Do you save or destroy your field note?


 

Me_and_partner_rex_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 6 years ago

 

1) First Person


2) Avoid using police codes or jargon


3) Computer


4) Signed hard copy filed and stored in a hard file


5) Unsworn


6) always the shift and tour commander (sometimes chief depends on what it is)


7) Standard reports for incidents and Motor vehicle accident reports


8) 3 working days however officers must complete all reports prior to going off duty


9) Destroy field notes

Hunter_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 6 years ago

 

First person, no codes, hand written (or yes, we do still have typewriters), All reports are filed and kept for at least 7 years, unsworn clerk, Patrol Supervisor and Shift Supervisor are responsible for review, Incident/Preliminary Crime Reports and Accident Reports, 48 hours, I have every notebook from day one for my own records.


FORMERLY KNOWN AS wgipson1073.
Proud Member of the Michigan Snowmobile Association and the Seney Snowmobile Association. "Keep the track side down." (If you have to ask, you wouldn't understand.

Mud_pic_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 6 years ago

 

3rd person, no codes(unless you explain the code), computer, there is no hard copy, sworn clerk, each shift supervisor reviews makes comments then sends it back to the creator and they fix it and submit again for approval, ours system has drop boxes on most of the report except of course the narrative, 5 days before a civilian could come in an get a report of an incident, usually save field notes for personal reference before trials and such, but never taken into the court room.

Photo_user_blank_big

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Rate This | Posted about 6 years ago

 

All done on computer- all reports & traffic accidents ( templates for everything) Everything is saved to mainframe at central dispatch & dept. copies are printed out. Chief reviews all reports & traffic citations, warning, etc. Use officer's narrative & public narrative ( brief statement of type of call-for press release purposes) All a pain  in the ass! Old school works better- If they had just let me do everything on Microsoft Word I would be OK, but these drop-down menus & boxes are for the birds!


mike nichols

Me_and_partner_rex_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 6 years ago

 

OK for the Departments that do not print and sign a hard copy let me ask a question: If you need to produce a hard copy for court or requested discovery do you sign the hard copy when printed and if you do what date do you use? The date the report was written or the date the report was printed??

Mud_pic_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 6 years ago

 

We print a copy but we don't sign or date it.

200718_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 6 years ago

 

1. First Person


2. No codes or jargon -- plain language


3. Computer


4. Only certain types of reports are signed in hard copy (e.g., Use of Force)


5. Records is not sworn, but administrative staff taking action on reports are sworn.


6. Area supervisor and shift commander review reports.


7. All reports are standardized.


8. Electronic copies of reports are available immediately (unless designated confidential)


9. Depends.

Private_property_sign_max50

48 posts

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Rate This | Posted almost 6 years ago

 

1.) Reports are typically written in first person but third person is acceptable.


2.) We do not use police codes in reports.


3.) Computer reports that are printed and sent to records department.


4.) We have one records clerk that is non-sworn.


5.) Reports are reviewed and approved by shift supervisor (sgt.) or the corporal when the sgt. is off


6.) All officers file the same standard report


7.) reports are typically available in 3 to 5 business days


8.) The decision to keep field notes lies soley with the reporting officer

Reno2_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 6 years ago

 

I work for the City of Reno Police Dept. (Reno, NV).  Our criminal/incident reporting system can be done either by transcribing the report or by computer.  Transcription can be done by an officer either by transcribing over a recording system in the report room or by calling in to the transcription program and transcribing the report telephonically.  Once the tapes or recordings area received by our transcriptionists the reports are written on the computer reporting system and an email is sent to the officer (usually within 24 hours) that the report is ready to be reviewed and approved by the officer for submission.  All in all the whole process is time effecient and keeps officers out on the streets longer.  However, an officer can still type their report on the computer.  All of our officers (close to 400 sworn) are issued thumbdrives (portable electronic storage devices) which the officer can plug into the USB port in the computer inside the patrol cruiser.  The officer can then write his/her report and save it onto the thumbdrive.  Later the officer can submit the report into the system personally.


As for how reports are written we teach the recruits to speak in the first person and to include any an all pertinent information that was heard by the officer themselves or any statements and information given to the officers.  We do not use police jargon or 10 codes and any field notes are kept or destroyed at the officer discretion.


Our records personnel are non-sworn and they collect all of the reports and file hard copies as well as electronic copies.  Reports are available usually within 3-5 working days.  All reports with the exception of traffic accident reports are done on the same incident/crime reporting system that we use in the department. 


Officer P.R. Blas
Reno Police Department - Regional Gang Unit
455 E. 2nd St. Reno, NV 89505

Lone_ranger_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 5 years ago

 

I preferred my trainees to write their reports in third person being as they weren't guaranteed of being around if/when the report ended up in court. 


My agency is computerized and all reports are standardized.  My last agency was going to computer generated reports when I left.  I made sure my trainees were familiar with the hand written reports because the computer system was the best low bid would buy.


No codes were allowed but some abreviating was.  This allowed for the officers to refer to him/her self as R/O for reporting officer.


The computer reports are left in the computer for the records people to get.  \The records clerks were not sworn but a sworn officer was over that division. 


Reports are generally available after noon the next day.


There are no rules for maintaining the officer's notes but it is recommended.


"You can get much further with a kind word and a gun than with a kind word alone"- Al Capone

PL Mentoring Team Member

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Rate This | Posted about 5 years ago

 

From a leadership course I've imprinted the acronym K.I.S.S. (Keep It Simple, Stupid) in my mind. Our reports are written first person, no code, on the computer. Traffic cites are written in letter format to "Your honor", printed out, and then signed. Vehicle crashes are in a different format yet, using a digital state form. Our records clerks are all sworn, and reports are reviewed through an assigned officer at the department. All forms are standard across the department (I believe we have 35 various paperwork items that can be completed). We always tell people it's a 3-5 day wait on reports, but this depends on the approving officer's schedule. Field notes are all kept, and eventually put into storage, along with videos that correspond to the incident.


There's a wonderful PL article about report writing. It had great tips, and we distributed it through the department for training purposes. I would suggest finding it in the training area of the website!