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Is being a LEO hard?

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Rate This | Posted almost 4 years ago

 

enough said. if you're in Law Enforcement it's because you love the work. like i was told in the academy, your life is worth more than $$$$ per hour.

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Rate This | Posted almost 4 years ago

 

bump


Hello my name is Inigo Montoya, you killed my father, prepare to die.

"It's not a constitutional violation for a police officer to be a jerk." Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy -December 4, 2000

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Rate This | Posted almost 4 years ago

 

Thank you Retleo, this kind of post id the whole reason I come to this site. To seek insperation and to make sure that I really have what it takes to be a LEO. It is nice to know that there is an upside to the Job. No one talks about that and it never really occured to me that there was one. It is heartning to know that it is worth it, thanx again. V.


V:... for the value and veracity of such shall one day vindicate the vigilant and the virtuous. Verily, this vichyssoise of verbiage veers most verbose, so let me simply add that it's my very good honor to meet you and you may call me V. " V for Vendetta" 2005

Vi Veri Veniversum Vivus Vici. By the power of truth, I, while living, have conquered the universe.

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Rate This | Posted almost 4 years ago

 

gn13 says ...



It is information and insight like that provided by retleo that make me proud to be a part of this site and even more proud to be entering this field! 



I agree. thanks retleo


In GOD We Trust (All others get searched, then checked through NCIC)

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Rate This | Posted over 3 years ago

 

Retleo says ...



IS BEING A LEO HARD?


YES, "VERY HARD". While the actual day-to-day routine of police work is not particularly challenging, and at times it can become pretty mundane and boring, there are aspects of the job that are very difficult and it takes a very special breed of person to be able to deal with those aspects.  The job is generally hours of tedium and repetition interspersed with seconds of sheer adrenalin rush, terror, sadness, euphoria, and any point of the emotional senses continuum that you can imagine. You must be a strong individual, physically, mentally, emotionally, and spiritually to survive in this job.


As a "YOUNG" officer you will be asked to intercede in fights, domestics, child births, deaths (natural, accidental, homicidal, suicidal, etc), car chases, accidents (motor vehicle, train, boat, aircraft). You will pull children from burning buildings, sometimes alive, other times dead.  You will be tasked with telling people that a loved one has died, you will attend autopsies, you will see, smell, hear, and touch things that you would never, in a million years, think of doing as a civilian. You will deal with people of other cultures, religions, sexual preferences, and ideological backgrounds.  You will be yelled at, cried to, lied to, thanked, congratulated, ridiculed and vilified ( ridiculed and vilified, both in person and by the media).  You may have to defend yourself against physical or verbal attack, get shot, stabbed, or be hurt or killed in a car wreck. You will be the one running towards danger as all of those around you flee from it.  There will be times when you feel that you just can't go on.  You will see the worst of people and you will see the best of people.


You will work weekends, most holidays (Christmas, 4th of July, Thanksgiving, etc.), days, afternoons, midnights.  You will miss family birthdays, anniversaries, the kid's school plays and dance recitals, their football, soccer, and baseball games. Your spouse and kids will ask why you are never around for them on such occasions, while at work you are there for other families, and your heart will ache.  You will turn down invitation after invitation for dinnner and other social events from family and friends because your schedule only allows you one weekend a month off.  You will  start to socialize only with other LEOs because their work schedule matches your own.  You may develop a "Us vs Them" mentality in which you view anybody who is none-LEO as an outsider worthy of only suspicion and mistrust (a sad and dangerous mental pitfall).


While most people learn about Police Work from the "Cop" shows on television, and it all looks exciting and fun, you must be aware that police work is a very dangerous job that is not for the faint of heart or mind.  People bleed, puke, shit and die on you.  You will become part of a Community (LEO) that is not looked upon favorably by many (Liberals and the Media for starters), and you will find that when you begin your LEO career some people that you counted as friends no longer want to associate with you.  You will no longer be invited to some parties or gatherings because you are a "Cop". 


You will find that you can only discuss some of the things that happen "on the job" with other LEOs because friends and family "just don't understand", or don't have the capacity to put what you are talking about into perspective.  You may find that you cannot handle the stresses of the job, and may "turn to the bottle" or some other form of self-medication as a method of coping or escape (beware of this serious pitfall, seek help if you enter this doorway). 


You will interact with a variety of other LEOs during your career, from the excited and "Gung-Ho" Rookie to the cynical and "Do-Nothing" Grizzled Old Vet.  Do not follow the paths of the extremists in either camp.  Seek out the stable, dedicated and hard working officers in your department and learn from them.  If you find officers with 10, 20, or 30 years in Law Enforcement who still have a spark and are still enthusiastic about their job, then learn from these people. It is people like them that rise to the top and make the word "Professional" have real meaning in our LEO Community.


This is a job like no other.  Despite the costs that you pay, both physically and emotionally, the rewards are boundless and extremely fulfilling. It is, without doubt, the best job in the world!


 


Revised 9/23/08 11:15am (Retleo)





~~T_9

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Rate This | Posted over 3 years ago

 

This is very well put. Every LEO should live by it. While anybody wanting to be a LEO should realize it

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Rate This | Posted over 3 years ago

 

I also think that was very well put! Besides, if it was EASY, everyone could and would do it, right? It does take a special breed!

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Rate This | Posted over 3 years ago

 

I also think that was very well put.

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Rate This | Posted over 3 years ago

 

Quite a stunning post if I do say so. Definitely one of the best I've seen in a while and it touches upon almost every aspect of the job.


Sincerely,
Chris

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Rate This | Posted over 3 years ago

 

Its the hardest job you'll ever love.....

Carbon_motors_connect_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 3 years ago

 

I have to disagree with the liberal thing. I am a liberal and i LOVE Law enforcement, couldn't have more respect for them. BUT i DO understand where you come from, if anyone is being a little turd and saying "Fuck the police" Its usually, and, sadly for our reputation ("Our" being liberals) a liberal. And then they go on spouting about how they are always bothered by the police for their drug problems or they are always complaining about some "New world order" or "Police state" garbage.


It's all the same, only the names have changed.- Bon Jovi

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Rated +1 | Posted about 3 years ago

 

FSS, you are not a LEO yet. There is not problem with being liberial. Fact of the matter is most LEO's are more Libertarian/Conservative than anything else. There are many things that we are pretty liberial on socially as the right to equality and fairness. We do believe in being fiscally conservative and that you should earn what you get and that there is no free ride for anyone, or there should not be anyway. We are cynical and we need to see it to believe it and even then we have our doubts. <G> If and when you actually become a LEO you will be surprised at how much you will change by the time you get out of the police academy and even more after one year and then five years.


As great experiment would be for you to write down your feelings about certain ideal you may have about society in general and specific areas. Tuck that away and don't even look at it until after you complete the Academy. Put it back away and then look at it again after one year and then again in five years and you will be amazed at how much you have changed and may even shake your head and think "How damn dumb and naive I was!"

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Rate This | Posted about 3 years ago

 

My 2 cents I would like to share is that its a tough job in every sense and as was said the rewards know no bounds. 


Just last week I pulled a vehicle from one of our local lakes and a simple vehicle recovery yielded an occupant that was missing for nearly 30 years.  The reward was locating family members, confirming an ID through forensic investigation and notifying the remaining family members and next of kin to return their loved one back to them and provide closure for the family.


This was only the third time in my career that I was a part of something like this and it was the greatest feeling in the world to reunite a family an provide them with necesary closure.  True reward of law enforcement at any level!

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Rate This | Posted about 3 years ago

 

csiguy i bet, monetary rewards only last for a short time, but those kind of rewards last forever.


It's all the same, only the names have changed.- Bon Jovi

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Rate This | Posted about 3 years ago

 

T_9 says ...



Retleo says ...



IS BEING A LEO HARD?


YES, "VERY HARD". While the actual day-to-day routine of police work is not particularly challenging, and at times it can become pretty mundane and boring, there are aspects of the job that are very difficult and it takes a very special breed of person to be able to deal with those aspects.  The job is generally hours of tedium and repetition interspersed with seconds of sheer adrenalin rush, terror, sadness, euphoria, and any point of the emotional senses continuum that you can imagine. You must be a strong individual, physically, mentally, emotionally, and spiritually to survive in this job.


As a "YOUNG" officer you will be asked to intercede in fights, domestics, child births, deaths (natural, accidental, homicidal, suicidal, etc), car chases, accidents (motor vehicle, train, boat, aircraft). You will pull children from burning buildings, sometimes alive, other times dead.  You will be tasked with telling people that a loved one has died, you will attend autopsies, you will see, smell, hear, and touch things that you would never, in a million years, think of doing as a civilian. You will deal with people of other cultures, religions, sexual preferences, and ideological backgrounds.  You will be yelled at, cried to, lied to, thanked, congratulated, ridiculed and vilified ( ridiculed and vilified, both in person and by the media).  You may have to defend yourself against physical or verbal attack, get shot, stabbed, or be hurt or killed in a car wreck. You will be the one running towards danger as all of those around you flee from it.  There will be times when you feel that you just can't go on.  You will see the worst of people and you will see the best of people.


You will work weekends, most holidays (Christmas, 4th of July, Thanksgiving, etc.), days, afternoons, midnights.  You will miss family birthdays, anniversaries, the kid's school plays and dance recitals, their football, soccer, and baseball games. Your spouse and kids will ask why you are never around for them on such occasions, while at work you are there for other families, and your heart will ache.  You will turn down invitation after invitation for dinnner and other social events from family and friends because your schedule only allows you one weekend a month off.  You will  start to socialize only with other LEOs because their work schedule matches your own.  You may develop a "Us vs Them" mentality in which you view anybody who is none-LEO as an outsider worthy of only suspicion and mistrust (a sad and dangerous mental pitfall).


While most people learn about Police Work from the "Cop" shows on television, and it all looks exciting and fun, you must be aware that police work is a very dangerous job that is not for the faint of heart or mind.  People bleed, puke, shit and die on you.  You will become part of a Community (LEO) that is not looked upon favorably by many (Liberals and the Media for starters), and you will find that when you begin your LEO career some people that you counted as friends no longer want to associate with you.  You will no longer be invited to some parties or gatherings because you are a "Cop". 


You will find that you can only discuss some of the things that happen "on the job" with other LEOs because friends and family "just don't understand", or don't have the capacity to put what you are talking about into perspective.  You may find that you cannot handle the stresses of the job, and may "turn to the bottle" or some other form of self-medication as a method of coping or escape (beware of this serious pitfall, seek help if you enter this doorway). 


You will interact with a variety of other LEOs during your career, from the excited and "Gung-Ho" Rookie to the cynical and "Do-Nothing" Grizzled Old Vet.  Do not follow the paths of the extremists in either camp.  Seek out the stable, dedicated and hard working officers in your department and learn from them.  If you find officers with 10, 20, or 30 years in Law Enforcement who still have a spark and are still enthusiastic about their job, then learn from these people. It is people like them that rise to the top and make the word "Professional" have real meaning in our LEO Community.


This is a job like no other.  Despite the costs that you pay, both physically and emotionally, the rewards are boundless and extremely fulfilling. It is, without doubt, the best job in the world!


 


Revised 9/23/08 11:15am (Retleo)





I know im late to this party on the fourm but i agree 100%

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Rate This | Posted about 3 years ago

 

" Doing good police work is the most fun you will ever have in your life."  Joe Wambaugh's Hollywood Station.  The statment from the Oracle a 40+ year Patrol Sgt.


As I think about it after 43 years on the bricks.  That's Dang Right.  It has highs and lows but overall I wouldn't have missed a second of it.  We did thinks that Hollywood makes movies about, "Only you were there".  The job is as hard as you make it.  Even if you work a one man (person) car it's still a team that gets things done.  If you think "I,I,I" you will cause yourself problems.  Let your actions speek for you.  Than go on to the next assignment and have fun.

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Rate This | Posted about 3 years ago

 

Is it hard??  i'll tell you how hard it is.  This morning, my phone rung...woke me up.  I was told that one of my fellow officers was just killed in a firey car crash.  He burned alive.  Today, it sucks!!!.

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Rate This | Posted about 3 years ago

 

oldtimer322 sorry to hear about your friend and co-worker. Yeah it sucks to loose a friend and loved one but he died doing what he loved. Yes being a L.E.O. is hard but I do not think a single solitary one of us would ever trade it away. I to have lost friends in the line of duty and I never second guess myself on wanting to do this job. They all knew the dangers going into this line of work as do all of us.


Once again I am sorry about your friend and prayers to you, your Dept. and his family.


Bad stuff happens to good people, handle it and overcome.
My motto for life:
Let go and let GOD,
Only HE can control everything.

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Rate This | Posted about 3 years ago

 

Oldtimer it does suck and my thoughts and prayers are with you, your agency, and the family of Ofc Willingham! One of my guys had two pedestrians walk out in from of him last night. One is dead, the other probably will die, and he is an emotional train wreck. He is a rookie and I hope he can overcome this tragic accident.


For those of you thinking of making this your career goal take RETLEO's words to heart. This job is not for the faint of heart or mind, it is for the choosen few. I have been at this job for almost 16 years. I have lost friends in the line of duty. I have lost friends that crawled into a bottle and washed their careers away. I'm missed countless family functions, holidays, and events. I worked 12 hour shifts that turned into 36 hour crash investigations. I've worked countless fatality crash (I investigate fatal car crashes for my agency) and I've made that "knock" at the next of kin's door too many times to count. I've held hands, wiped tears, and been throw out of houses by grieving families.


Yet through all I've seen, endured, suffered through, and overcome I still love being a police officer. I cannot imagine doing anything else. There are very few careers where you'll find the caliber of people that exsist in this job. I'll walk through the gates of Hell. armed with a water pistol, if there is another cop in need of help or a "citizen" that needs our help. I love this job and it is a front row seat to the "Greatest Show on Earth."


PL Mentoring Team Member

My day begins when yours ends.

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Rate This | Posted about 3 years ago

 

Retleo says ...



As you may have noticed I have done some revisions on my original post based upon some of the posts that have been made in response to it.  I will keep it a "Work in Progess" and make additional revisions as needed.  Thank you all for your comments and input.  This job is our life and it is up to us to make certain that the newbies don't stumble into our world with blinders on.



Thank you soo much for not sugarcoating the LEO life.  I hate it when people don't give it to me straight.  I'm going to continue to go on as many ride-alongs as I can before I say goodbye to the Air Force and soak in all that knowledge.  Keep it up!

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Rate This | Posted about 3 years ago

 

This is the first time I have seen this.  Ret posted it before I was a member of PL.     Outstanding read.  Ret. has covered everything that is true about being a LEO.     Thanks you. Ret for you words of wisdom.

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Rate This | Posted almost 3 years ago

 

very motivating. retleo, you have written a true work of art.


 


i will be printing this out and keeping it in my wallet. the perfect reminder.

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Rate This | Posted almost 3 years ago

 

This is also the first time I've seen this, being new here.  It is a great read!!!


I would add one thing; coming in contact with people who have contagious diseases, and sometimes catching what they have.


I did not read every page of this thread, so forgive me if someone else already mentioned this.

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Rate This | Posted almost 3 years ago

 

Wonderfully put.

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Rate This | Posted almost 3 years ago

 

very well put retleo....though I am not a Police Officer I do work behind the walls of a prison and so much of what you wrote is true even for those of us working behind those walls....for us our greatest moments are knowing that we were there for each other when "shit kicked off" and that we all get to go home the same way we came in ( on our own two feet) and that we have done our part in keeping our families and communities safe from criminals ( even if only for a short while)...during my  yrs there I have had to put that black band on my badge more times than I want to remember and have been a pall bearer at our past Warden's funeral ( an honor for me to carry him to his final resting  place)....as hard as many of us work to be professional we still are looked at in such a negative light thanks in large part to the media and movies....but I love my career and couldn't think of doing anything else.


Never regret anything that made you smile.

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Rate This | Posted almost 3 years ago

 

Read and learned my work. There are no days off, there are no holidays. The family misses. But in another way to live already boringly.

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Rate This | Posted almost 3 years ago

 

 it's very informative and costructive negotiation has been. 


Keep it up !!!

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Rate This | Posted almost 3 years ago

 

My English doesn't allow me to speak seriously. I'm sorry.

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Rate This | Posted almost 3 years ago

 

No need to apologise officer-ru, your comments are understood and appreciated.  We are, after all, Brothers and Sisters of the Law!


"Be a yardstick of quality. Some people aren't used to an environment where excellence is expected."
Steve Jobs

Retleo (MODERATOR #8)
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Rate This | Posted over 2 years ago

 

Retleo says ...



Thanks for the kind words, glad that you all approve of the post.


 


I just read your post , that was amazing Retleo !!!  thank you.


 


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