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Is being a LEO hard?

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Rated +1 | Posted over 5 years ago

 

Thank you retleo for this post. I am working on getting my CJ degree and so far I have not heard one person state the facts as you have. It is nice to have a better understanding of what I am stepping into. I would be a fool to not understand the dangers that come along with this particular career choice, but I can't help but be excited as well. This is what I was born to do. To serve and protect the communitythat I love so much. As a cop you must have to be a very understanding, patient, forgiving individual and learn not to take things personally. It takes a very special breed of men and women to do what you do and I can only hope to learn from the best and work my butt off to work my way up from the bottom of the dog-pile. Thank you again for the honesty. It is truely appreciated by all.

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BUMP


Happiness is a belt fed weapon.
Great danger lies in the notion that we can reason with evil.

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Heroes Live Forever!

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this has got to be THE best explantion i have read about an LEO's life.

Avatar_wild_max50

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Heroes Live Forever!

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Man, if only the people that LEOs have to deal with constantly could read this and understand what they have to go through.


I wish I could quote this everytime I heard someone near me bash a police officer and it's sad that the greatest job in the world does not recieve the respect it deserves, but if everyone appreciated the police, then there would least likely be crime and their jobs might be obsolete.


I try to tell everyone who discourages me about being a cop, something along the lines of what Retleo wrote. I could not agree more with it being the greatest job on Earth. The satisfaction through self-sacrafice in knowing you made a difference in another's life is udoubtedly the best feeling in the world.


Is being an LEO hard? I believe it will be for me or anyone else, but I would say...it's worth it. 

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In a word. YES

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I've had this poem laying around for a while..A friend of mine sent it to me and I really liked it.


 


 


THE POLICEMAN'S LAST ROLL CALL ...


THE POLICEMAN STOOD AND FACED HIS GOD, WHICH MUST ALWAYS COME TO PASS. HE

HOPED HIS SHOES WERE SHINING, JUST AS BRIGHTLY AS HIS BRASS. "STEP FORWARD

NOW, POLICEMAN. HOW SHALL I DEAL WITH YOU? HAVE YOU ALWAYS TURNED THE OTHER

CHEEK? TO MY CHURCH HAVE YOU BEEN TRUE?"


THE POLICEMAN SQUARED his shoulders and said, "No, Lord, I guess I ain't.

Because those of us who carry badges can't always be a Saint. I've had to

work most Sundays, and at times my talk was rough, and sometimes I've been

violent because the streets are awfully tough. But I never took a penny that

wasn't mine to keep, though I worked a lot of overtime when the bills just

got to steep. And I never passed a cry for help, though times I shook with

fear. And sometimes, God forgive me, I've wept many unmanly tears. I know I

don't deserve a place among the people here, they never wanted me around

except to calm their fear. If you've a place for me Lord, it needn't be so

grand. I never expected or had too much, but if you don't, I'll understand."


There was silence all around the throne where the Saints had often trod. As

the policeman waited quietly, for the judgement of his God. "Step forward

now, policeman, you've borne your burdens well. Come walk a beat on Heaven's

streets, you've done your time in hell."

 

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Nice Poem!!!

Wolf_max160_max50

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I've been out of uniform since 03/04/09 after I blew out a disc in my back and had corrective surgery since.  I'm back to at least 4 hr a day shifts light duty, but man I'll tell you what -As "hard" of a job being an LEO is... I am about coming out of my skin I want to be back on "the beat" so bad.


Firearms are second only to the Constitution in importance; they are the peoples' liberty's teeth. -George Washington

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does everyone have to work on holidays???

Th_detective_max50

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We ALL work our share of Holidays, weekends, days, nights, afternoons.  The Police Department doen't shut down for Christmas, New Year, 4th of July, etc..........we are out there working the streets every day and night.


"Be a yardstick of quality. Some people aren't used to an environment where excellence is expected."
Steve Jobs

Retleo (MODERATOR #8)
Mentoring Team Member

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Rate This | Posted over 5 years ago

 

The only time an LEO will not be working on the Holidays, is when there is no Crime being done. No criminals on the streets.


And even then You will see a cruiser or two out on the streets just checking to be sure.


My hats off to all of the LEO's Past, Present and Future.

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Rate This | Posted over 5 years ago

 

Retleo I have never heard this job put into such good words. I just started my career and am halfway through the academy. I have never had it put so... Clearly.. Thanks for the advice!

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Retleo you have nailed it on the head. That was wonderful.

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Retleo says ...



IS BEING A LEO HARD?


YES, "VERY HARD". While the actual day-to-day routine of police work is not particularly challenging, and at times it can become pretty mundane and boring, there are aspects of the job that are very difficult and it takes a very special breed of person to be able to deal with those aspects.  The job is generally hours of tedium and repetition interspersed with seconds of sheer adrenalin rush, terror, sadness, euphoria, and any point of the emotional senses continuum that you can imagine. You must be a strong individual, physically, mentally, emotionally, and spiritually to survive in this job.


As a "YOUNG" officer you will be asked to intercede in fights, domestics, child births, deaths (natural, accidental, homicidal, suicidal, etc), car chases, accidents (motor vehicle, train, boat, aircraft). You will pull children from burning buildings, sometimes alive, other times dead.  You will be tasked with telling people that a loved one has died, you will attend autopsies, you will see, smell, hear, and touch things that you would never, in a million years, think of doing as a civilian. You will deal with people of other cultures, religions, sexual preferences, and ideological backgrounds.  You will be yelled at, cried to, lied to, thanked, congratulated, ridiculed and vilified ( ridiculed and vilified, both in person and by the media).  You may have to defend yourself against physical or verbal attack, get shot, stabbed, or be hurt or killed in a car wreck. You will be the one running towards danger as all of those around you flee from it.  There will be times when you feel that you just can't go on.  You will see the worst of people and you will see the best of people.


You will work weekends, most holidays (Christmas, 4th of July, Thanksgiving, etc.), days, afternoons, midnights.  You will miss family birthdays, anniversaries, the kid's school plays and dance recitals, their football, soccer, and baseball games. Your spouse and kids will ask why you are never around for them on such occasions, while at work you are there for other families, and your heart will ache.  You will turn down invitation after invitation for dinnner and other social events from family and friends because your schedule only allows you one weekend a month off.  You will  start to socialize only with other LEOs because their work schedule matches your own.  You may develop a "Us vs Them" mentality in which you view anybody who is none-LEO as an outsider worthy of only suspicion and mistrust (a sad and dangerous mental pitfall).


While most people learn about Police Work from the "Cop" shows on television, and it all looks exciting and fun, you must be aware that police work is a very dangerous job that is not for the faint of heart or mind.  People bleed, puke, shit and die on you.  You will become part of a Community (LEO) that is not looked upon favorably by many (Liberals and the Media for starters), and you will find that when you begin your LEO career some people that you counted as friends no longer want to associate with you.  You will no longer be invited to some parties or gatherings bacause you are a "Cop". 


You will find that you can only discuss some of the things that happen "on the job" with other LEOs because friends and family "just don't understand", or don't have the capacity to put what you are talking about into perspective.  You may find that you cannot handle the stresses of the job, and may "turn to the bottle" or some other form of self-medication as a method of coping or escape (beware of this serious pitfall, seek help if you enter this doorway). 


You will interact with a variety of other LEOs during your career, from the excited and "Gung-Ho" Rookie to the cynical and "Do-Nothing" Grizzled Old Vet.  Do not follow the paths of the extremists in either camp.  Seek out the stable, dedicated and hard working officers in your department and learn from them.  If you find officers with 10, 20, or 30 years in Law Enforcement who still has a spark and is still enthusiastic about their job, then learn from these people. It is people like them that rise to the top and make the word "Professional" have real meaning in our LEO Community.


This is a job like no other.  Despite the costs that you pay, both physically and emotionally, the rewards are boundless and extremely fulfilling. It is, without doubt, the best job in the world!


 


Revised 9/23/08 11:15am (Retleo)



Very well put Sir. I believe you have covered it completely


The mere fact that i am smiling at you should concern you. JD

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Retleo says ...



IS BEING A LEO HARD?


YES, "VERY HARD". While the actual day-to-day routine of police work is not particularly challenging, and at times it can become pretty mundane and boring, there are aspects of the job that are very difficult and it takes a very special breed of person to be able to deal with those aspects.  The job is generally hours of tedium and repetition interspersed with seconds of sheer adrenalin rush, terror, sadness, euphoria, and any point of the emotional senses continuum that you can imagine. You must be a strong individual, physically, mentally, emotionally, and spiritually to survive in this job.


As a "YOUNG" officer you will be asked to intercede in fights, domestics, child births, deaths (natural, accidental, homicidal, suicidal, etc), car chases, accidents (motor vehicle, train, boat, aircraft). You will pull children from burning buildings, sometimes alive, other times dead.  You will be tasked with telling people that a loved one has died, you will attend autopsies, you will see, smell, hear, and touch things that you would never, in a million years, think of doing as a civilian. You will deal with people of other cultures, religions, sexual preferences, and ideological backgrounds.  You will be yelled at, cried to, lied to, thanked, congratulated, ridiculed and vilified ( ridiculed and vilified, both in person and by the media).  You may have to defend yourself against physical or verbal attack, get shot, stabbed, or be hurt or killed in a car wreck. You will be the one running towards danger as all of those around you flee from it.  There will be times when you feel that you just can't go on.  You will see the worst of people and you will see the best of people.


You will work weekends, most holidays (Christmas, 4th of July, Thanksgiving, etc.), days, afternoons, midnights.  You will miss family birthdays, anniversaries, the kid's school plays and dance recitals, their football, soccer, and baseball games. Your spouse and kids will ask why you are never around for them on such occasions, while at work you are there for other families, and your heart will ache.  You will turn down invitation after invitation for dinnner and other social events from family and friends because your schedule only allows you one weekend a month off.  You will  start to socialize only with other LEOs because their work schedule matches your own.  You may develop a "Us vs Them" mentality in which you view anybody who is none-LEO as an outsider worthy of only suspicion and mistrust (a sad and dangerous mental pitfall).


While most people learn about Police Work from the "Cop" shows on television, and it all looks exciting and fun, you must be aware that police work is a very dangerous job that is not for the faint of heart or mind.  People bleed, puke, shit and die on you.  You will become part of a Community (LEO) that is not looked upon favorably by many (Liberals and the Media for starters), and you will find that when you begin your LEO career some people that you counted as friends no longer want to associate with you.  You will no longer be invited to some parties or gatherings bacause you are a "Cop". 


You will find that you can only discuss some of the things that happen "on the job" with other LEOs because friends and family "just don't understand", or don't have the capacity to put what you are talking about into perspective.  You may find that you cannot handle the stresses of the job, and may "turn to the bottle" or some other form of self-medication as a method of coping or escape (beware of this serious pitfall, seek help if you enter this doorway). 


You will interact with a variety of other LEOs during your career, from the excited and "Gung-Ho" Rookie to the cynical and "Do-Nothing" Grizzled Old Vet.  Do not follow the paths of the extremists in either camp.  Seek out the stable, dedicated and hard working officers in your department and learn from them.  If you find officers with 10, 20, or 30 years in Law Enforcement who still has a spark and is still enthusiastic about their job, then learn from these people. It is people like them that rise to the top and make the word "Professional" have real meaning in our LEO Community.


This is a job like no other.  Despite the costs that you pay, both physically and emotionally, the rewards are boundless and extremely fulfilling. It is, without doubt, the best job in the world!


 


Revised 9/23/08 11:15am (Retleo)



Wow, speechless, really puts things into perspective. Thank you that was tense, yet still makes me want to pursue Law Enforcement....can i maybe borrow that, I will def give you credit for it hands down.

Dscn0118_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 5 years ago

 

I am a future LEO, hopefully, and this article is amazing.  Thank you for putting in the time and effort it took to write this.  I wasn't paying enough attention the other day and was pulled over by an officer.  I received a citation...and then shook the officer's hand before he walked away.  I suprised him with my 'odd' reaction after receiving a citation...with gratitude.  Thank you all for your service.

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Rate This | Posted over 5 years ago

 

I learned a lot from this post. Thank you all for sharing your thoughts on what it's really like out there.

Gods_team_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 5 years ago

 

Well said, Retleo......Being a LEO is not for the faint of heart that's for sure.


http://www.iamsorryivotedforobama.com/

How's that HOPE and CHANGE working out for you?

What would you do for a Klondike bar?

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Rate This | Posted over 5 years ago

 

Some can because they must.


Some must because they can.


The level of difficulty for you will somewhat depend on which way you lean.


I can't top Retleo's post, nor would I try. All I can add, is you have to look inside yourself and try to place yourself in the many difficult situations of the good folks here who have tried to answer your question.


Let me put it this way, " If I could afford to do the job for free, I would."

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Rate This | Posted over 5 years ago

 

As a rookie, I find it extremely hard (maybe it's just me)... He're some things that I find difficult, in no particular order:



  • Getting dressed in a somewhat comfortable manner

  • Remembering all the items I need to drag into the cruiser such as extra tools, reference books, paperwork, food, beverages, etc...

  • Appeasing my FTO while trying my hardest to keep my mouth shut and not have an opinion

  • Pointing out things worth taking a look at without being overzealous or to gun ho

  • Remembering to use the civilian phonetic alphabet (and not the military one which makes 100 times more sense in my humblest opinion)

  • Trying to enter data in the MDT while talking on the radio, driving, and working the lights and sirens

  • Making a point to be polite, and not keep people on scene too long while bumbling through my paperwork (and while doing this remembering to ask if it's a current address, and make sure I get all pertinent information)

  • Staying awake and productive without getting into trouble

  • Trying not to be apologetic to those I have to stop and deal with even though they were stupid enough to break the law

  • Not swearing at people when they won't shut up, are rude and threatening, or make up excuses for even the dumbest of situations

  • Making time for paperwork and evidence when I've still got my hands full doing other things

  • Remaining proffessional when looking at a mess on the street that used to be a person

  • Asking the right questions to the right people and the right time

  • Not asking the wrong questions to my FTO's and other veteran officers (or anyone else for that matter)

It's not hard to be nice to people, and not hard to be mean - but it is difficult to know when to do which. Anyone can slap a set of cuffs on, but it's difficult to know when a person has crossed that line (at times). Policing seems like one of those things that takes a minute to learn and a lifetime to master (if even possible).


 

Clark__20david_20_20_20635462_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 5 years ago

 

Very well put to gether, We are a special breed indeed, Take care and be safe!!!!!!

Officer_down_max50_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 5 years ago

 

One of the best posts i've read. Shows the real insights and not the view of media.

Officer_down_max50_max50

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BUMP!

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Its not a job if you love what you do.  And I love my job!!!!!!!!!!!! Great post Retleo

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BUMP


"Be a yardstick of quality. Some people aren't used to an environment where excellence is expected."
Steve Jobs

Retleo (MODERATOR #8)
Mentoring Team Member

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Rate This | Posted about 5 years ago

 

I want you all to know that there are some of us "civies" out there who really appreciate what LEOs do. We are ususally good folks who don't end up interacting with LEOs much though. I personally make it a point to tell officers how much I appreciate them and the work they do every time I interact with them.


*


I am on the verge of starting a law enforcement career. At first, reading this puts a lump in my throat. My biggest fear is not that I will get killed or hurt but that I will loose my enthusiasm for the job and end up burning out or quitting. Its an honest fear. I don't know how many in my situation would admit to having it. But I've swallowed this lump before. None of this is new information to me. I have considered the consequences (good and bad) carefully many times before. This is just the first time I have had it all confirmed in writting all at once. I will press on and do my best. Some day soon I will be a LEO and on that day I pray that God will grant me the fortitude needed to do what you guys/gals do every day. God bless you all. 


*


Good post. Well put. I wish every civilian could read this and take it to heart.

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Rate This | Posted about 5 years ago

 

Thank you for those words, they were very well put together.


Supporting those that risk their lives to give me the freedom and safety I enjoy every day.
THANK YOU!

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Rate This | Posted almost 5 years ago

 

I would just like to add one more thing to this excellent post. 'just when you think you have seen, done, or heard it all. wham here comes something that makes you recoill and then strike with full force, because you have too. Always be safe and go Home, it's the greatest place on earth and your family thinks you are the greatest dad, greatest husband and coolest man around! "Then it's worth it all to be a hero and you know you have done your best at the end of each day. ****

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