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New reloader questions...

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Policelinkbadge_max160_1__max160_max160_max50

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Posted over 5 years ago

 

I haven't started reloading yet but have been very interested in doing so. My budget for reloading supplies is non-existant. What is the cheapest way for me to get started with reloading without getting turned off on the process all together?

Phil_beshoner_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 5 years ago

 

You might try visiting your local pawn shops. Many pawn shops in my area have used reloading equipment. I got all of my initial equipment there and then replaced it with better equipment after I decided that I love to reload. What calibers are you planning to reload and for what weapons?

Mr_ree_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 5 years ago

 

RCBS and Dillon are the bench marks. Save your money to buy a single stage press, good dies and reloading supplies.

Policelinkbadge_max160_1__max160_max160_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 5 years ago

 

I'm a competitve pistol shooter in Bullseye and Combat. I'm trying to start a pistol team at my current facility. I Love my S&W Model 66 and would love to reload some .38's to shoot through it for practice and maybe even competition. I want to find a way to make the ammo cheaper for us. Our Facility does not provide ammunition for training. (Cheap Ba******.) Thanks for the tip on the pawn shops, I'll check them out. I get the Dillon catalog periodically, I just can't afford their stuff yet. Again, thanks for the input though.

Meanass_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 5 years ago

 

HI, I'm new here. I can tell you that the stuff that LEE makes is good. Get a manual (doesn't matter what edition or year) (the sierra book makes a good one for cheap ammo) and find the loads you would like to make. Then, go to the hopefully local sports store that carries reloading components (or Midway.com) and start pricing bullets and powder. You can divide out and see exactly how much per round you will be spending. That way, when you run into stuff that comes in diff proportions, you will get a fair idea if it is saving you any money or not.


That said, for ALL you pistol needs, Lee makes a turret press deluxe kit for around $130. Everything you need except the dies, and you can find them on ebay/gunbroker/midway or cabelas. The carbide 4die sets are super easy, super nice, and super value. Get the dies for 357 and you can load that and .38spl. Reloading equipment will last forever if you take half as care of it as you would a revolver. So, used equipment is never a bad idea.


If you can shoot lead bullets, then look for the best price on those. Or even plated bullets. They are THE cheapest way to go. Keep velocity under 1000fps and never look back!


Watch out, it IS addictive,


Ryan


 

Pc1911reduced_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 5 years ago

 

Lee products are pretty good for the money, and will serve well for starting out and lasting you some time.  Lee offers a kit that includes most of what you need except for the dies and the components.


You'll want a good manual.  Lyman has a reloading guide with plenty of load data that is not specific to a particular bullet or powder brand.  It also has a good tutorial on getting started with reloading.  Another good source of load data is from the powder manufacturer's web pages.


MidwayUSA is where I got most of my reloading tools from.  For powder and primers try sourcing those locally for the smaller quantities you'll be starting with.  Once you decide to purchase 8# of powder and 10k primers or more at a time, then it becomes worthwhile to mail order the items and pay the extra hazmat shipping fees.  Powder Valley is where I usually obtain my primer and powders from.


For bullets, again, try sourcing locally for smaller quantities.  Once you get settled in, places like Precision Delta and Montana Gold have good prices that include shipping charges, but usually require minimum of 2 cases (2000 bullets) per order. 


For bullet choices, you have cast lead, copper plated (copper washed), and jacketed.  Dowside to cast lead is the lead deposits in the bore and shouldn't be fired through polygonal rifled barrels such as factory Glock barrels.  To minimize leading of the bore keep velocities on the low end of the spectrum.  On the plus side they are inexpensive and tend to be very accurate.  For the same amount of powder they will generate higher velocities than jacketed or plated.


Copped plated eliminates the leading problem of the bore, but weights and dimensions tend to be less consistent than jacketed.  Also, they can't be pushed as fast as jacketed, but can be loaded on the low end of the jacketed bullet loading guides or the upper end of the cast lead tables.   In my experience they tend to not be as consistently accurate as cast or jacketred bullets.  On the plus side with them, they are usually only marginally more expensive than case bullets.


Jacketed bullets are the most expensive of the three, but allow you to push the highest velocities.  These are the choice for shooting through a compensated gun.  They typically produce less copper fouling of the bore than plated bullets and tend to be more consistent in size and weight.  The copper jacket is thicker than that of the plated bullets.


I reload on a single stage as well as a Dillon 650 progressive.  The single stage is more versatile and I can load anything on it.  Currently my 650 is setup for .45 ACP and .223 as those are what I shoot the most.  Both presses have their pros and cons.  Biggest thing with the single stage is simplicity and versatility.  The progressive, however, lets me crank out hundreds of rounds per hour.  In fact, when I sit down at the progressive to load .45 rounds, I'll usually load 1000 rounds at a time in about an hour and a half sitting.


 


"Life is hard. It's even harder when you're stupid."

Photo_user_banned_big

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Rate This | Posted over 5 years ago

 

Get with someone that reloads and have them show you their setup and how it works. Buy a good reloading manual, or download data from the various powder/bullet companies.


Start with a single stage operation and do each step  the same way everytime that helps prevent mistakes which can be dangerous


Seriously consider used equiptment from ebay or gunbroker a huge savings there. You may want to think about casting your own bullets. I can load a box of .38 target for about 80 cents using cast bullets


There are several retailers besides Midway USA. Check them all out before to purchase.


I have been reloading for about 35 years and find that it is a great way to relax on a cold winter day then the snow is flying.


If I can help further email me @ hotmail.com">johnlaw484@hotmail.com


I'd rather have a sister in a whore thouse than a brother with a Glock

Pictures_old_085_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 5 years ago

 

johnlaw484c says ...



Get with someone that reloads and have them show you their setup and how it works. Buy a good reloading manual, or download data from the various powder/bullet companies.


Start with a single stage operation and do each step  the same way everytime that helps prevent mistakes which can be dangerous


Seriously consider used equiptment from ebay or gunbroker a huge savings there. You may want to think about casting your own bullets. I can load a box of .38 target for about 80 cents using cast bullets


There are several retailers besides Midway USA. Check them all out before to purchase.


I have been reloading for about 35 years and find that it is a great way to relax on a cold winter day then the snow is flying.


If I can help further email me @ hotmail.com">johnlaw484@hotmail.com



Couldn't agree more about learning with a friend...check out local rod & gun clubs for folks who reload; most are happy (and flattered) to share their knowledge.