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In_remembrance_of_oakland_pd_max50_max50_max160_max50

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Posted almost 6 years ago

 

Hey ya'll!  First, I would like to say thanks for the invite.  Second, I do have a couple of questions. Normal academy time is about 22 weeks from what I hear. Now after that, are you guaranteed a job or is there still the whole interview process?  Another question is relating to branching out after initial hiring. I want to join the department's SWAT/SRT/ERT.  Now for most departments I think you have to do a minimum of 5 years on patrol before they even look at an application to the program. Is that across the board or are there opportunites to further your career before that 5 year mark?  Lastly, the marriage topic.  How do you as officers, balance that time with your families with the job?  I know it can't be easy especially when you are working 12's or 10's.  I assume it's alot like being married in the military and I don't see a lot of those go well so I just want an officer's ideas on the matter.  I have about 2 years left before my time in the Navy is done and right now I'm looking at attending the Chautauqua County Sheriff's Academy up by Jamestown, NY. OUU! That reminds be of one more question.  How easy is lateral transfer? I know it changes from department to department but if I went to that academy and went to get a job in Colorado or North Carolina would it be relatively easy?  Once again, thank you for the invite and I hope to see you all around PoliceLink!


 

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Rate This | Posted almost 6 years ago

 

In Florida.  You can get to the academy in two ways one being hired by an agency and sent through the academy on their dime or two being an independant and paying for it yourself  (GI Bill will cover this).  


Swat/Srt and specialized units vary by department so there is no set answer for that question.  As far as marriage is concerned I went in to this job straight from the Army with my wife so she was use to long hours and all that.  She then went on to the academy because she figured I was having to much fun. 


Marriage is what it is.  If you have a commitment to each other you will find ways to make it work. For laterals to another state check out http://www.fdle.state.fl.us/ for a general idea on that subject as each states requirements are different.


I would not start asking about transfers and job hopping before being hired and completing the Chautauqua County Sheriff's Academy! That's not looked upon very well!

Th_detective_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 6 years ago

 

Hello Jon,


First and foremost, thank you for your service to our country.


1. Academy length varies from state to state, but the average is 20-22 weeks. Some agencies hire first, then send you to the academy.  In New Jersey we have what is called the Alternate Route Program where you pay your own way through the academy then seek employment ,although agencies usually approach you during the final weeks of the academy with offers of employment).  I am not sure if this occurs in other states, perhaps other members can answer that question.


2. After hiring it usually takes at least three years before you will be considered for promotion or assignment to special duties (SWAT, K-9, etc).  This too can vary between agencies.


3. Marriage can be tough even when you are not in the military or LEO work.  Shift work is definitely something you need to think about.  You will be working various shifts, weekends, holidays, etc (this can cause issues in the marriage if it is not agreed upon beforehand).  You will miss birthdays, holidays, family functions, etc.  LEO is far more than just a job, it is a commitment.


4. Lateral transfers are possible, but again, the requirements vary from state to state.  For example, if you transfer from New York to Florida you may have to go through some facets of their Academy to learn such things as state motor vehicle laws and training matters that are specific to that state.  You will also need to qualfy with a firearm ubnder that states law.  In some instances a state may not recognize your academy training and can require you to comlpete their entire academy program.  Check with the states and agencies that interst you to find out the specifics of transfers.


   


 


Good Luck in your endeavor to join the LEO community.


"Be a yardstick of quality. Some people aren't used to an environment where excellence is expected."
Steve Jobs

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Jpd_new_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 6 years ago

 

In Illinois you have to complete 400-480 hours in a State certified academy, unless you get hired by the State Police or Chicago PD (20-25 weeks).  The Department you get hired by usually sends you to the academy, for now.


Don't think you can walk into a specialized unit once you get hired.  You got to put some time in and learn the job and prove yourself. 


The divorce rate is high in police work, as well is suicide.


Some Departments offer lateral transfers once certified, but its frowned upon and could hurt your chances being initially hired.  The Departments don't like to train and equip someone for another Department.


Thank you for your service to our country and good luck.


"People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf."
George Orwell

“The supreme art of war is to subdue the enemy without fighting.”
― Sun Tzu

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In_remembrance_of_oakland_pd_max50_max50_max160_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 6 years ago

 

Thank you guy's for the advice and insight into the field.  I think i should have been a bit more clear with the lateral transfer thing because it seemed to irritate you all haha.  I plan on staying in upstate NY for a career because my family lives up in the area. The girlfriend (soon to be fiance, then wife) is finishing up her business degree and might have to move to advance in her field.  No, no, I'm not planning on dept hopping haha. Sorry, I should have read that and clarified. Trust me, I'm not a big fan of moving around, I've had enough of that in the military.  Thanks again for all the advice! 

Sjoyce_bw_5x7_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 6 years ago

 

Hello Jon,


Great questions, and equally great answers from all those who have replied thus far.  I would like to add one thing regarding lateral transfers. If you are referring to lateral transfers from one police agency to another, you should understand that situation is a rarity for folks under the rank of Lieutenant, and in some places, Captain.  Most agencies start you at the bottom, regardless of your prior experience.  Some will start you at one or two pay steps above the bottom for your experience.  Hopping from agency to agency plants you firmly at the bottom of the seniority list each time you move.  Only you can decide if a change in agencies is worth the pain of being low man again. 


Having said that, you have a better chance at experiencing diverse assignments in a big agency.  You may have to wait a while to get there, but if its what you want, its usually worth the wait.  Small agencies may offer a quicker road to a special assignment, but probably lack in diversity of assignments.  Specialty assignments also tend to set you up better for promotion. You get a much better focus on the big picture when you experience a variety of assignments.


Welcome to Police Link, and good luck with your law enforcement aspirations!

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Rate This | Posted almost 6 years ago

 

Welcome aboard, Jon!


In answer to your remark regarding marriage and police work, you may want to look at this article I found on another LE web site: http://www.behindthebadge.net/truelife/tl20.html


Marriage can be difficult at best, but an LE career can be especially stressful and create problems between you and your spouse. Be sure that you both understand completely what the effects of your decision to take this career path will have on your relationship. Finding common ground so that expectations are met is important.


Good luck!

In_remembrance_of_oakland_pd_max50_max50_max160_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 6 years ago

 

Thank you all for the support and the awesome answers. It really helps getting the info straight from the horses mouth so-to-speak. I appreciate all the help each and everyone on this site has given me. That marriage article was jjust what i was looking for. It seems that having a ground understanding of what comes with the job before hand goes a long way in helping a marriage mature. As for the special assignments i have a question about qualifications.  I know all the physical and mental requirements that need to be met but what about if you have surgery to correct a problem like an ankle?  In the military they can disqual you from participation even if you have had corrective surgery and everything works fine now because of a fear that it could create a problem later on.  Is there a policy similar to this in the LEO field or would that be a department policy?  Sorry if these questions seem pretty self explanitory haha. Talk to you all soon!

Brass_collection__4__max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 6 years ago

 

Jon, the medical question is one will probably never become an issue, unless you make it one. I had ankle reconstruction a year before I went to the academy, and it hasn't affected my career in the least in the fifteen years I've served.. Besides, if you do this job long enough, you'll have plenty of new injuries to concern yourself with!


FTO Dave Harnett

In_remembrance_of_oakland_pd_max50_max50_max160_max50

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Rated +1 | Posted almost 6 years ago

 

HAHA! I like that answer! Sounds a lot like the Navy recruiter haha. I kinda figured that but just wanted to make sure. Thank you much for the insight lol.

Munz_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 6 years ago

 

Hey there, sorry i didnt answer this before. here's the deal from NY


You have to be hired before you can attend an academy. The departmentthat hires you sponsors you to the academy. There are full time and part time acadamies here. Full time is about over 6 months depending onthe zone you are in. Part time gives the very basic for about 3 - 4 months a few days a week as oppose dto every day like a full time academy.


Once you complete the academy generally you have a probationary period that you do not need a reason to be terminated for. There is also Field training per department regulation from several weeks to another 6 months as in my Department. probation can last up to two years from date of appointment, or when you are hired.


Many departments do not require 5 years service to be placed in a different job within the department. In mine most jobs require 2 years service with an outstanding record. But then again, you are competing iwth some people who have been on many years and finally decide it is time to move around somewhat. So seniority will have a hand in play as well.


As far as lateral transfers. Most PD's will acept laterals directly withint he state without further academy training, Just some FTO stuff so you can get the idea of the area etc.


To go to another state I found that there were only a very few departments that did not acceept our training from Zone 7. Most thought it was superior to what they had goven their recruits. When I interviewed for jobs in other states only wanted me to go for penal law and criminal procedure for a couple weeks then FTO to learn the roads.


Some departments Like DADE / Broward in Florida and in California LAPD / LAACOSO- etc. wanted you to do the full academy because they were concerned about liability issues. On the other hand some counties in Florida tried hiring me the day i went in to just look around once they saw my schools.


Generally if you lateral from New York State, you would lateral to another department within the state though because the retiorement system is for NY only, so not wanting to lose the time you would stay within the state.


Hope this helps


 


Bob

S1509962333_30055001_6000_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 6 years ago

 

If you plan on serving in New York, the Criminal Procedure Law (CPL) dictates that in NYS you must do approximately 6 months in the academy. I can speak for the NYPD when it comes to getting into a SWAT unit, which is Emergency service Unit (ESU) in the NYPD. You must be off probation (2 Years), and then you can apply. Nevertheless, I assure you this, unless you know someone (hook), you're not getting in the unit.


After six months in the NYPD academy, you are then required to complete another six months in field training. If you’re lucky, you can get steady midnights in your assigned precinct - if not you will go onto a scooter rotating chart. Welcome to the world of foot posts, EDP's, and DOA's. All departments differ. If you come from an accredited academy/department and enter a Florida department as I did at one time - I went through an 80-hour conversion course.


However, of you go from the NYPD to Suffolk or Nassau county within NYS you have to go through the entire academy again - this includes going to NY/NJ PA.


 


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Munz_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 6 years ago

 

NYPD_Ret_Hwy says ...



If you plan on serving in New York, the Criminal Procedure Law (CPL) dictates that in NYS you must do approximately 6 months in the academy. I can speak for the NYPD when it comes to getting into a SWAT unit, which is Emergency service Unit (ESU) in the NYPD. You must be off probation (2 Years), and then you can apply. Nevertheless, I assure you this, unless you know someone (hook), you're not getting in the unit.



After six months in the NYPD academy, you are then required to complete another six months in field training. If you’re lucky, you can get steady midnights in your assigned precinct - if not you will go onto a scooter rotating chart. Welcome to the world of foot posts, EDP's, and DOA's. All departments differ. If you come from an accredited academy/department and enter a Florida department as I did at one time - I went through an 80-hour conversion course.



However, of you go from the NYPD to Suffolk or Nassau county within NYS you have to go through the entire academy again - this includes going to NY/NJ PA.



 A bit off topic but needs to be said.


NYPD is a world all it's own. It's so big and has so many different precints, jobs, officers and units it's hard to compare it to any other PD in the world. Hell being from Upstate we consider NY City proper almost another state entirley on some issues. It's so packed with people and so much diversity that you would need to go through the whole academy just for your own piece of mind! Not to mention that even though we are in the same state, the way that the laws are handled are so much different.


My best friend from College is a Sgt in NYPD also in ESU, and when we get together and discuss incidents, I am simply amazed how they are prosected there as opposed to here. Things are just ... I don't know ......... different. 


Cudos to NYPD's Finest!


 


be safe


Bob