Law Enforcement Specialties >> Special Units (K9, SWAT, etc.) >> Attention K-9's... I need your help

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Attention K-9's... I need your help

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100_2704_max50

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Posted almost 7 years ago

 

Here’s the deal, myself and 3 other deputies applied for an opening as a handler. I only have real competition from one other applicant though. I am the only translator for my S.O. and the other guy just had a 2 yr stint in narcotics but he quite the S.O. to go to DPS. Three weeks later he found out his wife was pregnant and came back to the S.O. with a demotion. We all have to take an oral board being put on by area handlers and former handlers. So what I need help with is some possible scenario questions the board may throw at me and or other things I may face.

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

One question that I was asked was- If you know that a armed suspect is in a building and a superior officer orders you to send in your dog, would you do it? Not wanting my dog to get hurt I first thought no, but pay attention to the question, I was ordered to do so. My reply was that I would do so in following the order presented to me by my superior..

10-1-2007-03_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

I agree w swat13laz... there would be questions reguarding whether to send your dog or not... remember the dog is a tool- just like your gun or tazer, etc. Be aware of when to use the dog... You have to be mentally prepared that you might send the dog out, and he/she might die... There could be q's reguarding where you might put the dog, if there would be many people in contact with it... Most departments down here will approve on the handlers choice to choose safety over anything else for the k9, but there is always that possibility... Also training... I'm not sure what your departments training schedule would be, but the some dprtmnts down here require a once a week training with eachother at least for a 4 hour block, and then a once a month training with a master trainer for an 8 hour block... The position requires a lot out of both dog and handler... Good luck to you!! Just remember from a trainer/handler: You have to be able to control your emotions!!!! (VERY IMPORTANT!!) What ever you feel will go straight down to the dog, which could cause MANY problems.... Keep posted!!

100_2704_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

Thanks for your responses.

Photo_user_banned_big

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

I would suggest grab a copy of your Dept. K-9 SOP, browse and memorize key points of how they want to patrol and utilize your K-9. They usually go by the SOP's or at least they do in my dept.

Hobbs_kc3_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

Why do you want this job and what makes you better than the rest!

Best wishes!

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

jendmurray5 said:

I agree w swat13laz... there would be questions reguarding whether to send your dog or not... remember the dog is a tool- just like your gun or tazer, etc. Be aware of when to use the dog... You have to be mentally prepared that you might send the dog out, and he/she might die... There could be q's reguarding where you might put the dog, if there would be many people in contact with it... Most departments down here will approve on the handlers choice to choose safety over anything else for the k9, but there is always that possibility... Also training... I'm not sure what your departments training schedule would be, but the some dprtmnts down here require a once a week training with eachother at least for a 4 hour block, and then a once a month training with a master trainer for an 8 hour block... The position requires a lot out of both dog and handler... Good luck to you!! Just remember from a trainer/handler: You have to be able to control your emotions!!!! (VERY IMPORTANT!!) What ever you feel will go straight down to the dog, which could cause MANY problems.... Keep posted!!

I would most definitely agree, if you are tense or nervous, your dog feels that down the lead, ten fold. It is unfortunate sometimes that as a handler we have to make the decision to send our partner into a dangerous situation, but that's the job and they love it!!! Remember, you want and your teammates (shift personnel) to come home safe and sometimes that may be at the cost of your K9 partner. Remember the dog will not save your life, but give you enough time to save your own. Stick with it, It's alot of work, but definitely pays off in the end.. Best of luck

Jpd_new_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

wusmc1833 said:

I would suggest grab a copy of your Dept. K-9 SOP, browse and memorize key points of how they want to patrol and utilize your K-9. They usually go by the SOP's or at least they do in my dept.

That worked for me!!! Also, know your Department's use of force policies. One question asked was about my residence (yard, fence, etc.), and how my family and neighbors would handle this. Promotional testing and unit commitment (3years) was also brought up. GOOD LUCK!!!


"People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf."
George Orwell

“The supreme art of war is to subdue the enemy without fighting.”
― Sun Tzu

PL Mentoring Team Member

Ford_interceptor_8_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

I guess the only thing left to say is GOOD LUCK!!

Cop_on_cop_junior_m1_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

in my department, they dont pay any extra for being a drug handler, so they beg us to do it, I just got my K9 from another officer who was burnt out from doing it, works fo rme

K9_smile_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

payner6165 said:

Thanks for your responses.

Good Luck

Picture_059_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

I would definately look over my department's K9 policy and the use of force policy and be familiar with it. I am sure they would give you some "what if" scenarios and ask what would you do. As far as Swat13laz's comment, about following orders....in our department policy, the K-9 Handler ALWAYS has the final decision on NOT to deploy the dog. If he feels that it is not a proper situation to deploy the dog, then he won't. Because once the crap hits the fan, and something happens to that dog....come the next morning, that supervisor who ordered you to send the dog in, will turn it around and put if off on you and say "well he's the K9 expert, he should have not sent the dog, even if I told him too".

100_2704_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

I was informed today that I got the job. Boy, I'll tell you what...This past week has been very long and suspenseful... But I know it's gonna be well worth it. Thanks again to all who posted.

10-1-2007-03_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

Congratulations!

Photo_user_banned_big

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Rate This | Posted almost 7 years ago

 

Congratulations on becoming a K-9. Although police are a small band of brothers, K-9's an even smaller one. I see that you posted this a few days ago and i missed it, but to answer a few of the questions, everyone pretty much covered it. As for the Supervisor telling you to send in the dog, that is your responsibility and yours alone. You releasing a dog is the same as you shooting the suspect. You can't just release him on anyone. Ask yourself this, if that supervisor was wrong, would he be there in court for you, telling the jury that he gave the order? Would he tell the Mayor or the Chief that he gave the order? When it comes to the dog, you're the only one that givesthe order on what your dog does. The supervisor may suggest you send the dog in, but that's about it. I love my dog. Wouldn't give him up for anything. But they are truly a liability if you're not careful.