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Someone who is interested in joining the reserve police

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Wedding_stuff_073_max50

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Posted about 7 years ago

 

My Name is Danielle and I am interested in becoming a reserve police officer and eventually becoming a police officer. My question is what can I do the start the process. What kind of Schooling do I need??

Bbqxena_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

Find the agencies you're interested in and ask them what their requirements are. Some require just school period and not necessarily a particular class.....while some don't even require school. The schools that can definitely assist you since you're probably not certified yet, would be your local State Academy....You become a much more appealing candidate if you're already certified peace officer.......

Why do reserve then full time? If that's what you want to do........just jump right into the full-meal deal........If you're not sure you want LEO as a career then go out on a bunch of Ride Alongs.....

The only thing I can think of other than that would be keeping the PT up to par.........not good to let that slide anyway..........especially when you're looking around to apply at different places...........Goodluck........

Wedding_stuff_073_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

Thanks for your comment. Every bit of info helps. I want to start out as a reserve right now because my son is only 2 so i figured i could get a couple years in doing something a little simpler until he reaches school years. I am very new at all of this but I am extremely interested in it!
Thank you for your time!

In_remembrance_of_oakland_pd_max160_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

Reserving is a great way to get your foot in the door and certainly a great way to train. Just remember to keep perspective. Once you put on the uniform, pin on the badge and strap on the gun, you ARE fully committed and every other LEO out there has every right to expect you to be on top of the game. Not to mention you owe it to yourself to stay safe and to that little 2-yr old that you go home to.

I say all this from experience. In 1978 I joined my first reserve program in Arizona. We trained for real because as much as any of us full-timers... it IS for real. Volunteerism is the life-blood of America so I applaude you for wanting to start out your career that way. I just urge you to be very careful not to ever let anyone refer to you as "just a reserve" or do anything that will allow you to develop a mind-set of being anything less than a real-live, genuine article Peace Officer. Go get 'em girl!

Mark_email_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

First let me say that the other two comments are full of great information.

I just wanted to add that you need to find a department that:
(1) Has a good training program for their reserves.
(2) Treats their reserves with the respect they deserve.
(3) Gives you the opportunity to do various duties. Patrol, Search & Rescue, motors…

Go to the departments that you are interested in and talk to the Reserve coordinator, attend some of their meetings and trainings and that will give you a better idea of what your in for.

Becoming a Reserve is a great start as long as you know that when you want to switch to full time you will probably have to go thru the academy again.

I started off being a specialist with the Los Angeles Police Department doing everything from working the desk to surveillance of high crime areas. After about 6 years of that I joined the Los Angeles County Sheriffs Departments reserve program. There we had almost a thousand reserves, more then some departments have regulars. Again the training we received and respect that was given from the full time deputies was great. I was never made to feel like anything other then another Deputy.

Well I hope this was at least a little helpful.

Good luck.

Weinblattmsnbc_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

All of this is true. A someone who wrote a regular column on reserves in Law and Order Magazine (from 1991 to 2001), and has served as a reserve officer, reserve lieutenant, reserve coordinator, full-time officer, and a police chief who started a volunteer reserve program, I fully believe in the concept. It is a great way to put the police in the community and the community in the police. The reservists become the agency's ambassadors to the neighborhood.

Check out my website for lots of articles on reserves under the articles section: www.policearticles.com.

You may also want to check out the Reserve Police Officers Association: www.reservepolice.org.

From your perspective, it is a great way to become a known commodity to the area agencies (assuming that you do a good job, the reverse is also true). It'll give you a feel if you want to be in law enforcement, what type of law enforcement work you like (municipal. county, state, campus, hospital, specialized), and what agency you want to be attached to.

In some states, you don't even have to go back through the academy. Florida (where I run a police academy) has two levels of non-full-time law enforcers: Auxiliary which have an abbreviated academy and have authority while under the supervision of a certified officer (radio supervision may be adequate depending on the agency's policy) and reserve who have full academy training, take the law enforcement officer state certification exam and have full authority just like a full-time paid officer or deputy sheriff does.

In any event, being a reserve is a great step for you. Let me know if you have any other questions about being a reserve.

Sgts_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

www.fairlawnauxpolice.com I run the site and I have training information, etc.

Picture_174_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

I was a reserve deputy with a local sheriffs dept in Tennessee. We had to attend training put on by the dept before we were allowed to work as reserves. After that, we were treated just like the regulars and could go out on patrol with them. Each dept is different, but mine required us to work 48s hr per quarter, 24 of those 48 hrs had to be on patrol ( we were allowed to work paid security jobs too, they didn't us being reserve deputies just for the paid jobs), and 40 hrs of inservice training per year. I had lots of fun doing it. With my dept, it was a huge out of pocket expense though ( about $1500) because we had to buy all of our own gear, uniforms, guns ( had to be a model 22, or 23 GLock). I had lots of fun with it.

100_5892_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

I currently have my application in the local reserve police , the waiting is killing me.. *LOL*.. good luck with it.

Hughes__20walter_1__max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

Danielle,
I am a retired Sergeant with the MNPD in Nashville and I know they are looking for some new recruits. You have to have at least 2 years college to join and they even have a program to help you with college while being a working reserve. This might be worth checking out. I am now in Real Estate and help in raising money for families of Officers and Firemen that are critically injured or killed in the line of duty. Check out my site. www.CODE-5000.com If you or anyone you know needs a Realtor, I am a member of a National Relocation Team and can help anywhere, anytime and it will help us to raise money for this worthy cause. Good luck in your future and God bless...

1979_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

It's a great way to find out if you really want a career in Law Enforcement. Check with your local agencies and see what they require. Being a reserve is very fulfilling work and a wonderful program. I served as a Reserve Officer in San Diego for over three years because I was active US Navy and could not go full-time. I still managed to work around 30 hrs a week and learned quite a bit that served me well later. I even managed to attain the rank of Sgt and because of my work ethic and willingness to learn and work with others, I was highly respected by the regular Officers who wanted to work with me all the time. Often some of them would call me and ask if I was coming in because they wanted me as a partner that shift. You learn a lot and appreciate the Police much more.

Photo_user_blank_big

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Rate This | Posted over 2 years ago

 

Robocop33 says ...



I served as a Reserve Officer in San Diego for over three years because I was active US Navy and could not go full-time. I still managed to work around 30 hrs a week and learned quite a bit that served me well later.



Off topic I know but how exactly did you manage this?  I'm currently in the Marines and would LOVE to be a Reserve Officer while off work.  I don't really know much about it at all except that the whole reason I joined the Marines was because I was too young to become an officer.  Did you have to go to a police academy during your off work hours at work or how exactly did that work?  Any help with this would be greatly appreciated.

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Rate This | Posted over 2 years ago

 

Not sure about other agencys but here in Tallahassee you just call them for an interview,fingerprinted,background check and then your sworn in,as a reserve.You go on ride alongs,work ball games (college town) and other such events.Its a great way to get some experience and make some good contacts.

White_shirt_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 2 years ago

 

Reserves is an excellent way to begin your career. Everyone gave excellent advice. In my state the requirements and P.O.S.T. training are the same as full time personnel. I cannot speak for other state programs. Best to you.

Rcsd04_max600_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 2 years ago

 

 Great advice from everyone on here. I am currently a reserve deputy with a nice size department in SC. My advice to is to start getting into shape now, and possibly spending a couple days at the range if one is near you. You want to be in somewhat good shape when going through some of this training. Also on the range part, that would help a lot to get yourself familar to the weapon they use and get some practice time in. Most departments don't require schooling outside of high school, while others want at least an AS in some type of degree. Do some research of departments in your area, expand it a little if you want. Some of the best departments maybe an extra few miles drive. Find that department that trains all the time, that also allows their reserves to be a lot more proactive then others. My department allows its reserves to be involved with so much its hard to keep up with sometimes. But what I do is mostly drug enforcement, traffic, and a little of special undercover ops. I know the departments around me only let there reserves out on patrol and that's it. 


But basically just call around, visit some web sites of the departments and get ready. Be ready for some good training and a lot of fun. Also make sure that you are ready for a lot of hours in training, and at weird times. At times it may conflict with personal stuff. Just stick with it and you'll be on the path to full time, just like me. 


You wouldn't go in there for a million bucks...A Cop does it for less...A Reserve does it for free....

White_shirt_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 2 years ago

 

StrykerBrig21. I must disagree on your advice for the OP to visit a gun range. I advise those entering the academy to not go near a hand gun until they either start the academy or have a professional instruct them. Key word professional. Start with a blank slate. Your getting in shape is good advice.

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Rate This | Posted over 2 years ago

 

uncledennis1 says ...



StrykerBrig21. I must disagree on your advice for the OP to visit a gun range. I advise those entering the academy to not go near a hand gun until they either start the academy or have a professional instruct them. Key word professional. Start with a blank slate. Your getting in shape is good advice.



Bump!  Dont teach yourself bad habits learn from an instructor.

New_picture__1__max50

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Rate This | Posted over 2 years ago

 

Tallgov says ...



uncledennis1 says ...



StrykerBrig21. I must disagree on your advice for the OP to visit a gun range. I advise those entering the academy to not go near a hand gun until they either start the academy or have a professional instruct them. Key word professional. Start with a blank slate. Your getting in shape is good advice.



Bump!  Dont teach yourself bad habits learn from an instructor.



This is the first time that I have disagreed with you on an issue like this uncledennis, but some of us grew up with firearms and you can't unring that bell.  You can unlearn and do away with bad habbits.  I was poor with a long gun, but good with a hand gun.  After continuing training I am also good with long guns at this point.  I just don't want anyone to think that prior experience with weapons is always a bad thing


One reporters opinion  


 

Photo_user_blank_big

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Rate This | Posted over 2 years ago

 

Whatever training I'm going to need hopefully I'll be able to do it on the weekends or during night hours because I'll still have a full time job in the Marines and theirs no way I can get out of that work in the day.  Also this reserve job would be a way for me to get experience before I go back to my home town and attempt to become a LEO there.


Thanks for all the advice.