Group Forums >> Law Enforcement History >> Walking the 'Beat"

Rate

Walking the 'Beat"

2,582 Views
14 Replies Flag as inappropriate
Isabel2003_max50

90 posts

back to top

Posted over 6 years ago

 

I haven't posted lately, due to work and home demands, but here's some idle LE history thoughts...


Everyone in Law enforcement and anyone who's watch old cop shows or films know that police and deputies either 'walk a beat' or in the case of my department 'work a beat'.  Everyone also knows that a beat is a geographic location or zone...an area that an officer, deputy, or constable is assigned to protect and serve. But did a word that 'normally' is associated with hitting someone or winning against someone, get a tied to police work.


Well doing a little research and it seems that in Scotland during the late 1600's and early 1700's a king's hunter would be used to flush out  game on the king's preserve along well-beaten game paths.  Later these same hunters were given the duty to protect the preserves against poachers, so they would walk along the same well-beaten paths to look for violators.  These game wardens would often used the term that they were going to walk their beat (area of beaten paths) to patrol for poachers. 


That's one theory for the use of the term.  Has anyone else heard any other theories? 


How about the word nickname for police, 'cop'? Or why do some department issue their officer a 'shield" (bage). How many names do you know for our impact weapons (baton, ASP, nightstick, billyclub, etc.).  Thoughts for discussion.

-1019 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted over 6 years ago

 

I used to be involved in the Crime Prevention Unit and we were under the impression that "cop" came from the cooper buttons on the police uniform in the Robert Peel Era of 1829. I have read on here that it was in reference to the "copper" badge that police wore. I guess I should investigate it but I like my version better.

128846014394059542_max50

353 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted over 6 years ago

 

"Short for copper (“‘police officer’”), itself from cop (“‘one who cops’”) above, i.e. a criminal. Sometimes explained as deriving from copper buttons or badges of early NYPD uniforms, though this is often stated to be a folk etymology."


In the eyes of a speechless animal there are words only the wise can understand.

128846014394059542_max50

353 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted over 6 years ago

 

"How many names do you know for our impact weapons (baton, ASP, nightstick, billyclub, etc.)."


I simply called it the "stick." Remember the old stories of those wild weekend nights when the veterans would tell the others "well we got a lot of stick time in over the weekend."


In the eyes of a speechless animal there are words only the wise can understand.

Evil_max50

7070 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted over 6 years ago

 

Baton, Nightstick, ASP, Monodnock (sp?), Straight stick, PR-24, Side Handle Baton, Expandable Baton, and my personal favorite Dork Slayer


You have the rest of your life to solve the problem, how long your life lasts depends on how well you do it. -Clint Smith

Respect it

Robertmitchum_max50

6467 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted over 6 years ago

 

ValyCop says ...



"How many names do you know for our impact weapons (baton, ASP, nightstick, billyclub, etc.)."


I simply called it the "stick." Remember the old stories of those wild weekend nights when the veterans would tell the others "well we got a lot of stick time in over the weekend."



____________________________________________________________


 Stick time.??? What is stick time, I have never heard of that one before.. Or at least thats my story, I will have to take the 5th on that one...


For so long as one hundred men remain alive, we shall never under any conditions submit to the domination of the English. It is not for glory or riches or honours that we fight, but only for liberty, which no good man will consent to lose but with his life.

The Declaration of Arbroath, 1320

SCREW TIBET FREE SCOTLAND !!!!

128846014394059542_max50

353 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted over 6 years ago

 

bad_LT says ...



ValyCop says ...



"How many names do you know for our impact weapons (baton, ASP, nightstick, billyclub, etc.)."


I simply called it the "stick." Remember the old stories of those wild weekend nights when the veterans would tell the others "well we got a lot of stick time in over the weekend."



____________________________________________________________


 Stick time.??? What is stick time, I have never heard of that one before.. Or at least thats my story, I will have to take the 5th on that one...


 


Bad_LT that was a long long time ago........I know what you're going to say next "you're showing your age," right?



In the eyes of a speechless animal there are words only the wise can understand.

128846014394059542_max50

353 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted over 6 years ago

 

Oh and one other thing, yes I still carry the PR-24, but I have my original baton I carried as a rookie officer. It's made from black walnut complete with the leather handstrap. I can twirl it with the best of them either left or right handed; and when I walk I don't just walk I saunter. Yep..........showing my age.


In the eyes of a speechless animal there are words only the wise can understand.

Isabel2003_max50

90 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted over 6 years ago

 

ValyCop says ...



"How many names do you know for our impact weapons (baton, ASP, nightstick, billyclub, etc.)."


I simply called it the "stick." Remember the old stories of those wild weekend nights when the veterans would tell the others "well we got a lot of stick time in over the weekend."



Oh, yeah...stick time.  I remember that phrase when I use to do real police work.

Jason_curtman_max50

222 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted over 6 years ago

 

Stick Time is a close cousin of Flashlight Therapy!

Bulldog_blue_beer_max50

20 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted over 6 years ago

 

ValyCop says ...



"How many names do you know for our impact weapons (baton, ASP, nightstick, billyclub, etc.)."


I simply called it the "stick." Remember the old stories of those wild weekend nights when the veterans would tell the others "well we got a lot of stick time in over the weekend."



Do you remember the "Kel Light"?

128846014394059542_max50

353 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted over 6 years ago

 

KSF says ...



ValyCop says ...



"How many names do you know for our impact weapons (baton, ASP, nightstick, billyclub, etc.)."


I simply called it the "stick." Remember the old stories of those wild weekend nights when the veterans would tell the others "well we got a lot of stick time in over the weekend."



Do you remember the "Kel Light"?


 


Oh yes, I carried one of the old KEL Lights for years. Love'm!



In the eyes of a speechless animal there are words only the wise can understand.

N725313004_1114080_3236_max50

362 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted about 6 years ago

 

RussLesco says ...



I haven't posted lately, due to work and home demands, but here's some idle LE history thoughts...


Everyone in Law enforcement and anyone who's watch old cop shows or films know that police and deputies either 'walk a beat' or in the case of my department 'work a beat'.  Everyone also knows that a beat is a geographic location or zone...an area that an officer, deputy, or constable is assigned to protect and serve. But did a word that 'normally' is associated with hitting someone or winning against someone, get a tied to police work.


Well doing a little research and it seems that in Scotland during the late 1600's and early 1700's a king's hunter would be used to flush out  game on the king's preserve along well-beaten game paths.  Later these same hunters were given the duty to protect the preserves against poachers, so they would walk along the same well-beaten paths to look for violators.  These game wardens would often used the term that they were going to walk their beat (area of beaten paths) to patrol for poachers. 


That's one theory for the use of the term.  Has anyone else heard any other theories? 


How about the word nickname for police, 'cop'? Or why do some department issue their officer a 'shield" (bage). How many names do you know for our impact weapons (baton, ASP, nightstick, billyclub, etc.).  Thoughts for discussion.


 



There might be a bit of cross contaimination of therory in your post, as I was taught and recollect it all anyway (which of course doesnt make me 100% right)


In the UK, hunting game with gun as you have described was for the wealthy/Royals/etc.  They could afford to employ Beaters.  Beaters would walk along game trails and "Beat the bushes" to drive our the quail or other quarry into the shooting range of the hunter.  Many would follow the same trails regularly, hence they were 'well beaten."  The forest wardens or game keepers (who were normally under private employ, not for the public good unless appointed by a Royal or Lord of the land)  may have also done this.  Keep in mind poaching was a crime against the Crown when done without permit or tax or against the private owner of the land the game was taken from.


Walking the Beat, as I was always told, had more to do with beating your show leather against the pavment.  Granddad and Dad both walked a beat.  Half way through his career Dad got to 'work a beat' when he got a cool 1965 Ford to ride in with a gumball on the roof.  Reportes use this terminology too, as they must press also beat sole to ground in order to get the 'scoop.


Also going back to the UK (England to be exact), COP actually was born from shortening the phrase Constable On Patrol.  Maybe that is why today in police work we are so submerged in acronyms - because our very monicker was one the first commonly used ones; COP.  In close relation to COP is the term COPPER - which I was taught did indeed refer to the metal that most police buttons/badges were made from.  CONSTABLE ON PATROL and COPPER were just coincidence in phraseology.  Copper is however, still a common term used for police in and around the Chicago IL area as well as in the UK.


"Let us speak courteously, deal fairly, and keep ourselves armed and ready."

President Theodore Roosevelt
13 May 1903

Isabel2003_max50

90 posts

back to top
Rate

Rate This | Posted about 6 years ago

 

I have heard the Constable On Patrol  theory in the past, however I could never find real refernce for it and I found several references regarding the use of the word copper as it referred to police badges.  However, I have since gone to a very good source of information (snopes.com) and have discovered another theory to the origin of the word cop (as it referrs to police officer). 


According to the website (http://www.snopes.com/language/acronyms/cop.asp) cop was used to mean sieze or arrest. They point out some vaild points and even site dates when the terminology was used as it relates to police actions.