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question for 911 dispatchers/operators

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Posted over 6 years ago

 

I was wondering if anyone who is a 911 operator/dispatcher has ever received a call in which the caller was calling 911 but pretending to be on the phone with someone else because there was someone there with them and they didn't want them to hear what they were saying.  I've only heard of this happening once but it was over twenty years ago and I was wondering if it a common occurance or if anyone has dealt with it before.  Please post and let me know. 

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Rate This | Posted over 6 years ago

 

This actually happens more in large cities, but at least here in TX when we go through the course they teach about how to decipher this type of call so that the officer response is not delayed. I have only experienced this once during a DV situation. And yes it is stressfull trying to get the information that you need without the other person alerting the person they are keeping away. It's a scary call.

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Rate This | Posted over 6 years ago

 

Happens alot in domestic violence incidents.  The best thing to do is ask simple questions that require yes and no answers.  It can be fustrating but it is best to try and obtain as much information as you can not only for their safety but for the safety of the Officer that you have responding to the call. 


I had one that after answering a few question pretended she hung up, placed the phone down,  then proceeded to give details through arguing with the husband. 


"A woman is like a tea bag. You never know how strong she is until she gets into hot water." -- Eleanor Roosevelt

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Rate This | Posted over 6 years ago

 

I have been a telecommunicator with my 911 center for 15 years, I personally myself...have encountered this situation several time. Most of the time it involves domestic situations. During the course of the conversation, I am prone to ask questions that require yes or no answers. Our CAD (computer aided dispach) system forms a history on addresses so we are able to pull up previous calls which helps up to gain some insight as to who the aggressor may or may not be. If the victim is not in the position of giving a name, based on call history, if indeed the person at the time is the same one causing the problem, by questioning the victim on a recorded line and receiving a yes to the question, we are able to obtain a lot of information needed prior to law enforcement arrival. We sometimes coax our victims to pretend as if they are talking to a friend and ramble on about trivial happenings, even if it means pretending to laugh out loud.  You would be amazed at some of the ideas, we have been known to come up with in order to calm callers down so as to get the information vital to ensure the safety not only for all emergency resources responding ,but the safety of the victims themselves.

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Rate This | Posted over 6 years ago

 

Slightly off the topic of your original question, but there is an excellent article in the current (June 08) issue of the FBI Bulletin detailing how dispatchers can obtain suble indicators that someone reporting a crime on 911 may, infact, be the person responsible for the crime.


It m ade very interesting reading - even though I am not a dispatcher.  The June edition is not available on line yet, but will likely be there soon at http://www.fbi.gov/publications/leb/2008/leb08.htm

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Rate This | Posted over 6 years ago

 

thank you so much to everyone who has replied- i really apreciate you taking the time to fill me in- if anyone wants to see a segment of the 90's show rescue 911 that has a call like this click here for the youtube video.  an actual recording of the call where the woman pretends to be on the phone with work while actually calling a friend, then 911 is in the video as well.  this is what sparked my interest and made me decide to ask.  thanks again to everyone!

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Rate This | Posted over 6 years ago

 

jabro77 says ...



Happens alot in domestic violence incidents.  The best thing to do is ask simple questions that require yes and no answers.  It can be fustrating but it is best to try and obtain as much information as you can not only for their safety but for the safety of the Officer that you have responding to the call. 


I had one that after answering a few question pretended she hung up, placed the phone down,  then proceeded to give details through arguing with the husband. 



 I agree have had this occur with me as well.