Law Enforcement Specialties >> Transit and Railroad Law Enforcement >> Railroad PD requirements in CA

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Railroad PD requirements in CA

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Mcalipat_max50

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Posted about 6 years ago

 

What is required to become a railroad police officer in CA  / What agencies exist in CA?

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Rate This | Posted about 6 years ago

 

Okay,


Don't hold me to this, but what I've heard from my counterparts out West, the requirements for a railroad police officer is to be POST certified. Once hired on by the railroad, you are commissioned through the state of CA (Governer actually signs off on your commission).

Mcalipat_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 6 years ago

 

Thanks, I had heard the authority came from the governer even though railroad officers are federal.

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Rate This | Posted about 6 years ago

 

Actually, it's a little more complex than that. Railroad police are employed by the individual railroad itself. They are commissioned through their state just as any other police officer. Each state has its own laws pertaining to railroad police. Some limit their jurisdiction to just railroad property, while other states open the jurisdiction just as a state trooper would have, including traffic enforcement.


In Texas, we are paid by the railroad (to include retirement), appointed by the Director of the Texas Dept. of Public Safety, and commissioned by the Texas Railroad Association. Our primary jurisdiction is railroad property or off property while investigating crimes. We are not allowed to enforce traffic laws, but we still have the authority of arrest off property, but must turn the prisoner over to the locals who have primary jurisdiction. 


The federal authority we get is from the United States Code, it allows us to carry our police commission out of state while on official railroad business. Basically if I go TDY to California to work a detail, California honors my TCLEOSE (aka POST) training, and I become a California peace officer. Again, depending on what state you get sent to limits what powers of arrest you have. 


We like to joke that our jurisdiction is 50 ft. wide and 53,000 miles long.


AMTRAK police are commissioned and enforce laws in the same manner that a private railroad carrier's police department can. 

Mcalipat_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 6 years ago

 

Thanks for all the information, I really appreciate it. It must be tough to see some of those bad drivers and not be able to enforce traffic.... I bet you guys keep busy in your field though. Have a great day.


 


AL

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Rate This | Posted about 6 years ago

 

 


First post..........
I am a Railway Police Constable in Ontario, Canada.  Up here railway police receive their authority from the Railway Safety Act, which is federal legislation.  It states, in a nutshell that railways may appoint police constables who are then sworn by Superior (Federal) Court Judges. Our jurisdiction under said legislation states on or within 500m (1/2 mile) of the property for provincial or federal laws. In some provinces we have “provincial” jurisdiction for provincial offences. Meaning we can enforce laws anywhere. Traffic enforcement makes up a large portion of our duties. 
 
 
 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CN_Police

Boris_current_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 5 years ago

 

Hi to all,


I’m Railway Police Officer in Novi Sad PD, Serbia. Here in Serbia things are little different then in US or CAN. First off all, Serbian police are highly centralized organization under Ministry of Interior. That means every police officer has full authority nationwide. Our police are territorially organized in 14 PD’s. PD’s are divided in several municipal Police Stations with strict territorial jurisdiction.


Only exterritorial Police Stations are 5 Railway Police Stations which are located in 5 major Serbian cities. Our primary role is to keep railway passengers safe. Our patrols escort passengers trains and maintain law and order, prevent crime and looks for wanted persons.


As I mentioned before we have full police authority in the train and train stops. Only difference is that we don’t process any felony or misconducts, but we turn everything to local police.  

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Rate This | Posted over 5 years ago

 

Wow! It is nice to hear from other "railcops" outside the U.S.!


In response to SAMUNIT, yes, it is unsettling to see all those bad drivers and have to turn the other cheek, more so when you are assigned a marked unit with POLICE written all over it! However, Texas' driving while intoxicated statute allows a Texas Peace Officer to stop, investigate, and arrest a driver for DWI since the law is under our Penal Code and not transportation code. We just have to turn the suspect over to an agency with jurisdiction.

Joker-as-police-man_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 5 years ago

 

In California our authority is derived from 830.33(e)(1) of the Penal Code.  While it is true our primary jursidiction is on or about RR property,  we take the same oath as our counterparts and have a duty to act when we observe a criminial act. Especially when that criminal act is a threat to Public safety....while it is true our jurisdiction varies in different parts of the Country, here in CA it is pretty liberal. I have been involved with and taken LE action out of our primary jurisdiction many times in my career...to include VC enforcement, DUI check points and DUI Arrests...not to mention that most of the same problems that face our local LEOs also find there way onto our areas of control, it ranges from public intoxication, drug violations, stolen vehicles, to trespassing and other minor infractions...I enjoy the job because I am not limited to one beat or a city, I have multiple Counties to patrol. That is both a blessing and a curse....

Avatar_-_ollie_-_170_bw_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 5 years ago

 

APDSARGE is exactly right.  While my primary focus is obviously railroad-nexus incidents, if I witness a flagrant violation, I do not hesitate to step in - up to and including citation or booking.  PC 830.33 provides explicit state-wide Peace Officer authority.


Not every state follows this practice but in California, surprisingly, we're given quite a bit of leeway.


Minimum requirements are:

Completion of a POST-approved Basic Academy

Commission from the Governor

Administration of the oath of office by a judge


As stated, we have full Peace Officer powers in the state of California and inter-state authority from the federal government.


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