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Took down my partner

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Clarke_photo_max50

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Posted about 7 years ago

 

In the 5 years I have been in Law Enforcement with the last 1 1/2 years in Juvenile Corrections I was placed in the unthinkable situation......I had to take down my partner. This morning we were on one of the cell blocks and having a pretty normal morning. We got the kids up, got them fed and was cleaning up the unit. One of the youth came up to me and stated that my partner said something negative about his sister. Now we have been having problems with this youth most of the morning, nothing bad, just a lot of trash talk, nothing new with this youth. I told him to go back to his cell and I would look into the situation for him. I turned around and the youth and my partner was nose to nose. I immediately stepped in between them and told them both to disengage. My partner grabbed the youth by his jumpsuit and began pushing him back towards the unit staircase. I yelled at them both to disengage for which the youth complied by raising his hands. Unfortunately, my partner did not. I attempted to break the hold he had on the youth and the end result, I had to use Physical Control Measures on him. Very fortunately, another Correctional Officer saw what was going on and called it in for back-up. We eventually got it broke up and my forced my partner off the unit before a riot started.

I don't know why I feel like crap about this, because my partner is a known "screw-up" and have been dodging the investigator's bullet for awhile. We are supposed to have each others back and not use our training on each other. But, on the same token, we are sworn to protect these youthful offenders at all cost. My Captain took me aside and told me that as a Sergeant it is your duty and responsibility to handle situations like this, even if it means taking down your fellow officers. I understood what he was saying, but, it still does not make me feel any better about the incident. The rest of the shift was even more interesting.......every time I passed an officer while making my rounds, I can hear them making comments about my actions. I just ignored them and went on with my duties, not wanting to cause any more friction since I got transferred to this watch just over 2 weeks ago. Has anybody else had a similar situation and how did you deal with it? Any comments good or bad.............

Clarke_photo_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

Popular topic..............not one response.

Space_with_rainier_max600_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

Wish I could say something to help you on the matter...But my opinion and only my opinion I think you did the right thing. I know we are sworn to protect and serve.....There is also the code to back your partner....But is your job worth loosing for a known screw up?


A veteran is someone who, at one point in his life, wrote a blank check made payable to 'The United States of America ' for an amount of 'up to and including my life.!

Piggycop2_1__max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

Not a good place to be in......You did the right thing. Take care of you and keep us posted.

Big_dog_pd_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

The right thing to do is often the most hardest, hang in there

Photo_user_blank_big

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

This situation proves we are all human and make mistakes. This also shows that even the "screw-ups" can be hired to do a high stress job. You are having the dilema of trying to trust someone that tried to cross the fine line between professional aggression and simple abuse of power (no matter how small the case, its still abuse of power by losing control of yourself and causing an escalation of the situation to the point where more people are likely going to be hurt or worse) You did the right thing. When I did my oral interview with a local police department- one of the questions they had was "if you are with your field training officer and he starts beating up a handcuffed suspect - what are you gonna do?" They ask this question because it is a tough one to answer.
You didn't say what was being said by the other officers during your rounds. They may have been saying they were glad it was you and not them that had to step in. FROM WHAT YOU HAVE SAID, YOU RESPONDED QUICKLY AND PROPERLY TO CONTROL A POTENTIALLY BAD SITUATION CAUSED BY AN OUT OF CONTROL COWORKER. GREAT JOB!

9-11-logo_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

Viper, I read your post with interest last night, but didn't feel myself to be the right person to respond, since I'm not a LEO. I'm glad folks have begun to weigh in, so you can get some feedback and support. FWIW, I recognize you were in a tough position and believe that you did the right thing. Backing each other up is admirable, of course, but it can't extend to looking the other way on something like this, or you become the thing you hate.

Clarke_photo_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

Thanks for the response. I am feeling better, still sucks about the situation. But, like my Captain said, I am a Sergeant now and with the promotion comes difficult decisions. I am not going to have my career ruined because of the decisions other officers make. I am going to keeping training the officers the best I can and hope that something like this doesn't happen again. If I was to do it over again, my decision would be the same. We have a hard enough time keeping good officers because of low starting pay, but to loose them because of corrupt or screw-up officers is unacceptable. I can't control the pay, but I can control the actions of the officers and train them to be better officers.

9-11-logo_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

Life is a lot simpler if you all know what's right and what's wrong, and stick with that as your "bottom line". If it gets into "He was wrong but he's my partner so I have to help him get away with it", you are suddenly standing on shifting sand and don't know where the heck you can stand. You become an accomplice.

It was an unfair thing for him to put you in that situation-- he brought it on himself when he did that.

Motor_cop_comic_max160_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

SPSGT11 said:

The right thing to do is often the most hardest, hang in there

It would have been much, much worse had you failed to act. You prevented the situation from getting worse, and acted as a supervisor should act.


"You can't lead from behind" Gen'l James Longstreet, CSA

Images_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

sgt457 said:


SPSGT11 said:


The right thing to do is often the most hardest, hang in there


It would have been much, much worse had you failed to act. You prevented the situation from getting worse, and acted as a supervisor should act.


I have to agree with others on this thread. This officer, by getting in a "pissing contest" with an inmate was putting you and all other officers in danger. I have had to intervene in such sititutions, though to a lesser degree, and it is never pretty.The outcome is much better than what could have happened if you had not acted.

100_1981_3__max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

Viper, you did the right thing. Maybe it wasn't popular decision, but it was the the right one. Do NOT Monday morning quarterback yourself. You are a Sgt, a supervisor. You were placed in this situation by your partner, he forced you to take action. It all falls back on the law enforcement code of ethics.

You will find that when one of your "subordinates" screws up the brass will take it out of your a$$. You will have to make some unpopular decisions as a supervisor, but that is the nature of the beast.


"It would be better for one to have a stone tied around their neck and thrown into the sea, than to cause a child to stumble."

"Well-behaved women rarely make history"

Lake_front_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

ok...I am chiming in as a civilian...don't throw things...lol...
I think your partner let you down , he lost control , he wasn't doing his job properly ,
He wasn't "thinking" of his partner....

Docolduniform_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

viperrob8 said:

Thanks for the response. I am feeling better, still sucks about the situation. But, like my Captain said, I am a Sergeant now and with the promotion comes difficult decisions. I am not going to have my career ruined because of the decisions other officers make. I am going to keeping training the officers the best I can and hope that something like this doesn't happen again. If I was to do it over again, my decision would be the same. We have a hard enough time keeping good officers because of low starting pay, but to loose them because of corrupt or screw-up officers is unacceptable. I can't control the pay, but I can control the actions of the officers and train them to be better officers.

Viperrob8... its good to hear you are feeling better about the situation. My question is: Was your partner a CO 1 or a Sergeant too? Being a new CO 1 myself I'm forced to weigh the good, the bad & the ugly right from start in my 9 month probationary period. Its a real learning experience for me, so I can only imagine what your going through.


We have a hard enough time keeping good officers because of low starting pay, but to loose them because of corrupt or screw-up officers is unacceptable. I can’t control the pay, but I can control the actions of the officers and train them to be better officers.



You hit the nail directly on the head here... this is an excellent start to a new promotion just remember even the slightest amount of effort takes time to make a difference


Don't forget... the toes you step on today might be attached to the ass you'll be kissing tomorrow!

Clarke_photo_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

He is a JCO I and still on probation. Our probation isn't 9 months, it is 18 months. He was a State transfer from Adult Corrections and is supposed to leave soon for a PO position in another county. Hopefully, the investigators can stop that transfer from happening.

Pd_patch_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

If you think about this the right way you did look out for your partner you kept him from getting everyone involved in a lot of trouble...

Draped_badge_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

All of us know the screwups that are out there on the street and they make all the good officers look like garbage. Our job is hard enough without the screwing ups making it into public view and making us look bad. Good job because you probably saved the kid from at least a really bad beating and when it would have hit the paper then we all get the shaft.

2004_0304macandanna0005_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

I am in detention. Although I spend most of my time in a courtroom setting rather than the jail, it is the same for us. Your desision was a good one. It would be nice in a perfect world to be able to tell your partner he or she made a mistake and do so in a privite setting but you are sometimes forced to take actions that can't wait for a one on one. Screwups are in every part of the profession and sooner or later get weeded out. Sooner is better for the good of all. My hat is off to you for stepping up and doing what every good officer would do. I would be proud to work with you anytime.

Img_3413_sq90_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

As a civilian employee who has worked for two different departments and know of Officers who were arrested for a variety of reasons. As a result, I know how hard it can be for the one that comes forward. Sometimes they are supported and other times, people just refuse to believe the one going down could do anything wrong. You did what you had to do, especially as a Sgt. Continue to hang in there and know that you did the right thing. Most importantly everyone ended up safe and not injured.

Wolf_max160_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

ycso1290 said:

I am in detention. Although I spend most of my time in a courtroom setting rather than the jail, it is the same for us. Your desision was a good one. It would be nice in a perfect world to be able to tell your partner he or she made a mistake and do so in a privite setting but you are sometimes forced to take actions that can't wait for a one on one. Screwups are in every part of the profession and sooner or later get weeded out. Sooner is better for the good of all. My hat is off to you for stepping up and doing what every good officer would do. I would be proud to work with you anytime.

Not only justified action but commendable. I'd make it a point to talk to each and every Officer criticizing your action and hash it out. If they aren't on the same page then I'd say you're not working in a very safe environment.


Firearms are second only to the Constitution in importance; they are the peoples' liberty's teeth. -George Washington

Trabuebaea2_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

Viper, If this officer is worth anything he would have thanked you later for getting him out of a situation that his temper got him into. If he didn't do that, then consider what would have happened had you let him continue his attack. Both of you would be on the street. I don't know of 1 officer who hasn't acted out of anger and put himself in a bad spot like this. I have been there and pulled others out alike. Your job as a C.O. is to maintian order within the building and also protect the inmates.