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Campus vs other Law Enforcement

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Randycas_max50

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Posted over 6 years ago

 

I have recently applied to the University of Washington Campus Police and the Harborview Medical Center Safety Patrol but feel uninformed about the differences between the Campus Police and other law enforcement agencies. I am also applying for the CO in several areas such as Tacoma and possibly Seattle but definitely Washington State. What information can be useful to a new candidate looking for a better job in law enforcement. I currently work for Securitas and would love to take my experience to enhance my career.


I do realize that jobs such as the Harborview Medical Center Safety Patrol have jobs that are somewhat defined but you need to utilize good judgement within the force. In competing for these positions what are some good books to read for both entertainment and for preparing myself professionally? What is the difference between the Campus Police and other Police units specifically those who assist with Campus Police and those who are in disciplines that are similar? I don't want to open up all the different sections of the force but rather the infrastructure along with goals, purpose and boundaries.

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Rate This | Posted over 6 years ago

 

They deal with the same type crimes as city, county, or state Officers, but in Indiana, Campus Police only have authority on campus.  There is a bill in the legislature to make them have statewide authority, but I don't know if that has passed.  As for other states, I'm not sure on their authority.  Personally, I would not want to deal with drunk college kids all the time!!

Photo_user_banned_big

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Rate This | Posted over 6 years ago

 

Police are police...period.  we deal with the same crimes as town, city, county, or state police depts do.  Maybe not as much, depends on the college.  We are all on the same side here.  There are no differences except campus police answer to a lot of liberal college administrators.  That doesn't stop us from doing our jobs.  I'm not trying to sound like an a$$hole here, but police are police.  It would probably do you good to work the street for a city or town for a couple of years before you get into a campus setting.   Campuses are different.  Some have dorms and some are commuter.  Each are different.  Just like sheriff's offices are different from city or towns.  Each have different functions, but both enforce the law in their given jurisdictions.  As far as books are concerned, I'll take the street knowledge any day to a book.  JMO

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Rate This | Posted over 6 years ago

 

I agree with the Chief, same crimes just different frequency.  Campus departments suffer the political liberal educational setting.  If you want to get a good feel go on multiple ride-a-longs and ask those guys about the job.  No two departments are going to be the same, just find one you like and go test, we are all short and would love a new officer to help!  After you get a few years in, take a step back, re-evaluate, and manage your career then, when you have more informed information and know your own personal likes and dislikes.  Good Luck!

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Rate This | Posted over 6 years ago

 

CampusCopAZ says ...



I agree with the Chief, same crimes just different frequency.  Campus departments suffer the political liberal educational setting.  If you want to get a good feel go on multiple ride-a-longs and ask those guys about the job.  No two departments are going to be the same, just find one you like and go test, we are all short and would love a new officer to help!  After you get a few years in, take a step back, re-evaluate, and manage your career then, when you have more informed information and know your own personal likes and dislikes.  Good Luck!



This is real good advice.  After you get some experience under your belt your interests may change.

Gator_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 6 years ago

 

Campus cops are cops! Just think if it weren't for The University of Florida Police Dept. we wouldn't have the now infamous line "Don't Taze Me Bro'"

Deadman_pirate_flag_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 6 years ago

 

I have to be quite honest. Campus law enforcement is generally NOT the same as what I hesitantly refer to as "real world policing". Having worked for a municipal police department for five years before relocating to a new area and hastily accepting a job with a campus PD, I feel that I'm somwhat qualified to offer an opinion.


In my experience, which mirrors stories that I've since heard from campus officers from across the country, a campus atmosphere is much more political than that of a city, county, etc. Enforcing the laws of your state against the student body and/or faculty will most likely be frowned upon. Instead, many campus officers find themselves doing nothing more than "rattling doors" and enforcing campus housing regulations.


If you're currently pursuing a degree at the campus that you intend to police at, it may be acceptable for you, as many colleges offer free or discounted tuitions for employees. If you're looking at the job for any other reason, you MAY be disappointed.


As for me, my tenure as a campus cop lasted a WHOPPING four months, until I decided that I was tired of the BS, and luckily found a department which offered me an excellent position, thus putting me back my career track.


While I have the utmost respect for my brothers and sisters that protect our campuses across the country, it definately isn't for everybody.

Badge_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 6 years ago

 

BuzzKill says ...



In my experience, which mirrors stories that I've since heard from campus officers from across the country, a campus atmosphere is much more political than that of a city, county, etc. Enforcing the laws of your state against the student body and/or faculty will most likely be frowned upon. Instead, many campus officers find themselves doing nothing more than "rattling doors" and enforcing campus housing regulations.



Maybe its different in Georgia, but here at MSU we are considered on par with other local agencies. In many cases, we are better trained and better funded. We handle our own felonies (which, in my understanding, is not common), we carry both handguns and tasers, and we have both shotguns and AR-15s in our patrol vehicles. We attended the same Academy as all other Montana LEOs. We have a separate department that handles housing issues; all student and staff are held to the same laws as anyone anywhere else in Montana. There may be more political pressures, to be sure, but there are also hundreds more opportunities to be involved in community policing. And who do you think is going to get the call in an active shooter situation?


You just worked for the wrong university, my friend!


Oh for crying out loud!

N1202178746_305955_5462_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 6 years ago

 

There are some issues Campus Police may never have to deal with but for that matter the same can be said for Fish and Wildlife, Highway Patrol, Alcoholic Beverage Control, etc...etc...But they are Cops nonetheless. Campus police may deal with more drug issues, sexual assaults, DUIs then I do given the high volume of students at the most reckless age in their life.


Pain is weakness leaving the body.

Obstacles are what we see when we take our eyes off the goal.

Cot_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 6 years ago

 

Campus Police being just like Cops depends on the campus.  there are a few of the major colleges here in Tennessee that send their Campus Police to the same adacemy that the city police and county deputies attend.  the EXACT same school and the EXACT same classes and training.  Not all the Campus Police are the same though.  it depends on the campus and how they choose to have their officers trained.  we do have some colleges here that hire officers with absolutely no training and they dont respond to any calls at the college.  i guess it looks good for a student wanting to attend these schools for them to see Campus Police there, but little do they realize that some dont even carry flashlights because they are affraid of the damn dark.


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N29714890_35984201_6404885_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 6 years ago

 

BUZZKILL, sounds like you work for a university that doesn't support law enforcement. Where I work, yes we do deal with a lot of  BS but I also dealt with it when I worked for the county. My department has security officers to go along with police officers, so our police officers can concentrate on enforcing the laws and not just "ratteling doors" as you mentioned. I am an investigator and I deal with everything from simple little larcenies, to armed robberies, fraud, felony assaults, attempted murders and sexual assaults. It IS real world policing! As long as you have a chief and administration who back you!!!

Dsc00220_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 6 years ago

 

I agree cops are cops.  They should not be any difference.  In my state a few campus police did not carry, they were not allowed too, although they went through the same academy as every other police officer in the state.  That has since changed, luckily.  Still waiting for the Marine Patrol to start carrying, I heard the thought process for not allowing the marine patrol to carry was, do you want teachers and college students armed, although they could face some serious offenders during bike week.

N1202178746_305955_5462_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 6 years ago

 

All of our colleges that have a security force are staffed by fully sworn peace officers. We are just a little bit more strict then all agencies so it's hard to compare in most cases. For instance we have to take an annual fitness test every year and we are the only agency in the state that requires that.If I fail my test I get a re-test within 30 days, if I fail the re-test I could be terminated.




Pain is weakness leaving the body.

Obstacles are what we see when we take our eyes off the goal.

Ninja_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 6 years ago

 

police911 says ...



They deal with the same type crimes as city, county, or state Officers, but in Indiana, Campus Police only have authority on campus.  There is a bill in the legislature to make them have statewide authority, but I don't know if that has passed.  As for other states, I'm not sure on their authority.  Personally, I would not want to deal with drunk college kids all the time!!



As far as I know the officers I work with, Campus P.D. in Indiana, they have authority (arresting powers) throughout the state. Same as at IUPUI... Since they were all trained through the state. Our guys work out in the city and, if desperate needed out in the county too.... But they normally stay on campus since its their jurisdiction(SP?).... NOT TRYING TO SOUND DISRESPECTFULL IF I DO!!!! Just telling you what my expierence is... I'm disptacher/ex-cadet here....


"This is the true joy in life, the being used for a purpose recognized by yourself as a mighty one; the being thoroughly worn out before you are thrown on the scrap heap; the being a force of Nature instead of a feverish selfish little clod of ailments and grievances complaining that the world will not devote itself to making you happy. "
~George Bernard Shaw (1856 - 1950), Man and Superman, Epis

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Rate This | Posted about 6 years ago

 

As of now Campus Police in Indiana do not have state-wide authority.  There is a bill in the house to amend this, but I do not believe it has passed yet.  bjune21, you are correct that they attend the same training, but state law does not allow that statewide authority for them at this time.  I do know a Butler University PD Officer and he advised me they have an agreement with Marion County/Indianapolis Metro to extent their power in all of Marion County, but outside of that they have none. 


I am hoping the bill passes and they are given the same powers as the rest of us in Indiana.

100_2142_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 6 years ago

 

After reading all of the posts here, there's some great advice here, IMHO.  The best advice you're getting is "it depends on what campus you're working for".  I work for a University in Texas (not OF Texas).  I've been on the job for 9 years and one thing is very clear, you will be representing a conservative mind-set in a liberal setting.  Insert the term " you are a necessary evil", here.  When it comes to the faculty and staff, some will appreciate, some will tolerate, and some will hate; almost none will understand.  In Texas, University Police (public university's only) carry ALL powers in ANY county that the stated University has an intrest in.  If you work for UT or A&M you might s well have state jurisdiction.  We deal with any call that a city or county PD-SO would, just in a lower volume (in some instances).  However, underage drinking, sexual assualts, credit card abuse, thefts, burglaries, a plethora of drug offenses, and DUI's run rampant.  If you plan to join these ranks, brush up on the above offenses, and your political skills.

Ninja_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 6 years ago

 

police911 says ...



As of now Campus Police in Indiana do not have state-wide authority.  There is a bill in the house to amend this, but I do not believe it has passed yet.  bjune21, you are correct that they attend the same training, but state law does not allow that statewide authority for them at this time.  I do know a Butler University PD Officer and he advised me they have an agreement with Marion County/Indianapolis Metro to extent their power in all of Marion County, but outside of that they have none. 


I am hoping the bill passes and they are given the same powers as the rest of us in Indiana.



Ok ok I've had it explained to me a little more clearly by one of the officers here. He says the statue states that campus police have authority on the campus and surrounding streets unless they have a good working relationship with surrounding departments, (city,county) then they have authority within those jurisdictions as well. (not quoting the officer or staute word for word here) Any school that I've ever worked at they've had that kind of relationship with the surrounding departments. Like your BUPD officer. I know IUPUI has the same agreement with  IMPD. Sorry!!!!


I guess I confused them saying "yes we are real police officers not school security" with "we have statewide powers". Thanks for helping me get that clarified though!!!!


"This is the true joy in life, the being used for a purpose recognized by yourself as a mighty one; the being thoroughly worn out before you are thrown on the scrap heap; the being a force of Nature instead of a feverish selfish little clod of ailments and grievances complaining that the world will not devote itself to making you happy. "
~George Bernard Shaw (1856 - 1950), Man and Superman, Epis

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Rate This | Posted about 6 years ago

 

lawdog312 says ...



After reading all of the posts here, there's some great advice here, IMHO.  The best advice you're getting is "it depends on what campus you're working for".  I work for a University in Texas (not OF Texas).  I've been on the job for 9 years and one thing is very clear, you will be representing a conservative mind-set in a liberal setting.  Insert the term " you are a necessary evil", here.  When it comes to the faculty and staff, some will appreciate, some will tolerate, and some will hate; almost none will understand.  In Texas, University Police (public university's only) carry ALL powers in ANY county that the stated University has an intrest in.  If you work for UT or A&M you might s well have state jurisdiction.  We deal with any call that a city or county PD-SO would, just in a lower volume (in some instances).  However, underage drinking, sexual assualts, credit card abuse, thefts, burglaries, a plethora of drug offenses, and DUI's run rampant.  If you plan to join these ranks, brush up on the above offenses, and your political skills.



I have been with the University Police as a dispatcher for a little over three years now, and as stated above, we have state wide jurisdiction, basically anywhere we have a builing, land, rental property or anthing of that nature we have jurisdiction to do what is needed by law. We follow the same rules as outside agencies and work well with them. At my campus we use the S.O., DPS, and City for special events therefore creating a much needed commaraderie.  Also as stated above we deal a lot with the drunk students, but we also work high tech crimes as well such as hackers, identity theft, bomb threats, terroistic threats, stalking, and the list goes on. Definatly the call volume is lower but if you want to put it into prosepecive look at UT in Austin.  It is a small city within a city, not only do we house over 200 thousand faculty, staff, and students at one time during the school year, we are in the heart of Austin. We have the transients, the football games that bring people from out of state, out of town and so on and so forth, so you can imagine what things we deal with at any givin time.  As some have stated before COPS are Cops, as soon as you take the oath of your state, you hold the same power as any other officer of the law.

Policememorial---a_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 6 years ago

 

I know you asked this question a while ago, and you have received some really good answers from the people who responded. I wanted to give you a little more food for thought since you and I both share the same profession in the same state =P


Campus law enforcement is a ‘specialty” in law enforcement. It falls into the same category as say transit, hospital, park/natural resources police or even gambling/liquor enforcement. Campus police are cops, just like any other cop, but it is a special beat we patrol. I can tell you from personal experience there is a world of difference between the time I have been working on campus and my time as a street cop/judicial department agent. On the street you seem to be in “reactive” mode the majority of your time. On campus, it is a lot more pro-active. On the street, you are mainly viewed as someone who is there to either “harass” someone, punish someone for doing something they were not supposed to be doing or to take someone to jail. Most of the time these are negative contacts with the public. On campus while you still engage in a great deal of enforcement activities, you manage to come off as a more positive role model of law enforcement. I can’t really explain it except to attribute it to the environment you are policing. The people on campus are there mainly to get an education and they are more receptive to people in authority giving them corrective discipline. You still come in contact with skells, mutts, drug dealers, thieves and a host of unsavory people. You are still going to work your ass off running to calls for everything from burglaries and car prowls to drunken fights and sexual assaults. And with today’s trend of active shooters on campuses chances are you are going to run into your share of high risk situations just like any other cop.
None of what I said above is meant to detract from “street” cops. I love the street, and I love the men and women who work the street. Street policing is the meat and potatoes of law enforcement, and it is something you never truly get out of your system. My main reason for getting into campus law enforcement at the time was family issues, as a dad with 3 small kids I needed a more stable schedule to work with and my wife at the time slept a bit better knowing I was “safe” at work. Now that my kids are all grown up I would be a liar to say I don’t yearn for the excitement of being a street cop again.
The major difference you will find between the two jobs you listed is this: University of Washington campus police officers are just that – police officers. Harborview Medical Center officers (along with all of the other officers who work community and technical college campuses) while they have law enforcement responsibility on their campuses are not recognized as police officers by the state. This despite the word-for-word duplication of the duties and responsibilities of campus police/campus security in their respective job descriptions. This despite their meeting the definition of “police” “peace” and “law enforcement” officers in the RCWs and Webster’s dictionary. This despite the fact they are expected to be the first responders to any emergency on their campuses whether it be a natural disaster, a fire/medical emergency or a nut with a gun hell bent on killing as many people as he can. And also despite the fact that according to the state’s requirements for being hired as campus police/campus security you actually need MORE experience in law enforcement (2 years for campus security versus one year for campus police) they are still treated like the red headed stepchildren of campus law enforcement in Washington. The state acts as if they are ashamed of the fact campus security officers even exist or as if it would kill them to grant the community/technical college officers equal status with those at the university level and allow them to be recognized as campus police instead of campus security. After all they are doing the same job, with the same duties and responsibilities and taking the same risks, so why can’t they have the same status?
I hope your career path is taking you where you would like to be. Regardless of where you find your niche, police work is a very satisfying profession and one that really makes a difference in people’s lives. Keep us posted on how things turn out for you.


Nemo Me Impune Lacessit!

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Rate This | Posted almost 6 years ago

 

BuzzKill says ...



In my experience, which mirrors stories that I've since heard from campus officers from across the country, a campus atmosphere is much more political than that of a city, county, etc. Enforcing the laws of your state against the student body and/or faculty will most likely be frowned upon. Instead, many campus officers find themselves doing nothing more than "rattling doors" and enforcing campus housing regulations.


...While I have the utmost respect for my brothers and sisters that protect our campuses across the country, it definately isn't for everybody.



I totally agree with Buzz.  I was a campus officer for two years. And believe me, campus police is VERY POLITICAL!! The campus I worked at, the PD was nothing more than armed security. Yes we had arrest powers, but the HIGHER UPS didn't want us taking ANY law enforcement action against students or faculty members. We had a Chief of Police, but he had a Vice Chancellor over him.  The VC pretty much ran the department and he didn't have ANY law enforcement experience what so ever!!! Give you an example of what happened to me and was the last straw for me... I was working midnights and one night I saw a vehicle blow thru a red light. Naturally, I attempted to stop the vehicle....vehicle didnt' stop. Hmmm...with blue lights activated, bumped the siren several times. Still, no stop.  Hmmm...maybe the vehicle is going to the ER (worked for a campus that was also a research hospital).  Lights flashing, bumping the siren, not a full pursuit. The vehicle heads towards the ER and stops at an employee entrance into a parking deck. Right now I'm thinking "This is a MF'n employee!!" I get out of my unit and approach the vehicle. The gate comes up at the entrance and the vehicle drives off........ and parks. Out of the vehicle emerges an employee dressed in scrubbs and wearing campus ID badge. I ask this person "Sir are you headed for emergency surgery? Did you not see I was trying to stop you?" This person walks past me as if I wasn't even talking to him. Now, my instincts are telling me to do what any other officer would have done...I don't need to go into any further details. BUT!!! As I said earlier, the HIGHER UPS doesn't want us taking ANY law enforcement action against students/faculty. If we need to take action, there is a certain protocol that I will not go into. Needless to say...I was HOT !!!  The next day, I informed my Chief of the incident and gave him the employee's name. To shorten this story...let's just say the doctor didn't receive any disciplinary actions because he was "going to work". That same day, I filled out an application for another agency. There were several other factors leading up to me leaving, but this incident was the Very Last Straw.


"To protect the sheep you gotta catch the wolf, and it takes a wolf to catch a wolf." Alonzo Harris
Denzel Washington "Training Day"

Knighttemplar2_max50

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Rated +1 | Posted almost 6 years ago

 

In the State of California, all college and university police officers have statewide authority and have the same training requirements as municipal police officers and county deputy sheriff's.  This includes police officers of the University of California system, the California State University system, and California community colleges.  There is a difference with the community college police agencies.  They are all independent agencies.  They are not controled by a state chancellor but by elected local board of trustees for each college.  Some community colleges do not have a sworn police department on their campus but have non-sworn security officers.  Others, like the Los Angeles Community College District, who once had their own district police department, now contracts police service with the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department.  All UC's and Cal State Universities have their own POST police departments. 

Purdue_pete3_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 6 years ago

 

Working for one of the Indiana departments listed earlier, I will say that it is a case by case basis I think in regards to  "cooperation" with local law enforcement.  My personal experience is that campus officers are capable people, and in several cases way better trained as far as In-service than other law enforcement.  That is a feather in the cap so to speak. 


I've interviewed in the past with two different university police departments and the experiences were night and day.  Both were private institutions in Indiana.  One was very pro law enforcement.  The other interview was rather disturbing to the point the point that I just stopped giving good answers to their interview questions during my second interview.  They were VERY anti-law enforcement to the point that the interview was only going through the motions. 


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Rate This | Posted almost 6 years ago

 

I initially was hired by an ISD Police Department. Im paid more for what I do now, but the idea of campus law enforcement REALLY appeals to me. Many of the officers I know and hang out with back in Texas are campus police officers. I like their style, I like their training in community policing, I like that they are not call driven....they are FAR more proactive than reactive and that really appeals to me.


AND if that in itself were not enough, most of the ones I know go through far more tactical training than most other types of officers per the active shooter incident threat. AND they can attend classes at their universities for free. I know one Rice U officer who takes courses at Rice University...her spouse can do it...and her kid. Amazing.

Psco_profile1_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 6 years ago

 

PSDTeamLeader says ...



AND they can attend classes at their universities for free. I know one Rice U officer who takes courses at Rice University...her spouse can do it...and her kid. Amazing.



Yeah, that's one of the perks of being a Campus Officer!!


"To protect the sheep you gotta catch the wolf, and it takes a wolf to catch a wolf." Alonzo Harris
Denzel Washington "Training Day"

Me_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 6 years ago

 

I am a University police officer in Newport News, VA.  All the same authority, all the same dangers, but with more flack because we have "university" on our cars and uniforms.  I cannot tell you how many times someone has said I couldn't do something (such as arrest, traffic stop, etc.) and they got the business end of the judicial system.  We have the full support of our courthouse and the Commonwealth Attorney's Office (prosecutor) and they have said we are more articulate and better prepared than our municipal brothers.  Either way, if anyone is or may become collegiate officers, never let your guard down, as some kids just don't get it and are willing to risk more than they think they might.


1* - a philosophy you can live by. My VA license plate: 1S2RSK. If you don't know, ask.

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Rate This | Posted almost 6 years ago

 

the whole concept of "real cops" really makes me laugh. When both cops and private citizens try to say it to various non city PD personnel. It really makes me laugh. My ex who worked at at a university in Houston, she constantly got that from other cops...and even gets it from her new husband (who is a deputy constable turned military police Soldier on active duty.)  Never had any use for that sort of thinking.

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Rate This | Posted almost 6 years ago

 

When I worked as a campus officer, most of the city, county, and even state officers considered us as not "Real Cops". I guess it was due to the campus also being a research and the typical "county" hospital or "free" hospital. Most of our visual presence with the city officers were either driving around in circles around campus or inside the ER. A campus officer was assigned to the ER 24hrs manning a metal detector. Yes, there is a need for a metal detector. That ER is the only Level 3 trauma ER in the city. So most of the gunshot/stabbing victims are brought there. You'd be surprised at all of the retalitory(spelling) violence that occurs in that ER. All types of guns, knives, and drugs have been confiscated. So most officers would see the campus officer working that crappy post and would be like "you guys aren't real cops." Even most of the students and staff referred to us as "Security Guards". Even the public would question our police authority. They would say, "you guys aren't real cops, so you can't write me a ticket or tell me what to do." That was very common


"To protect the sheep you gotta catch the wolf, and it takes a wolf to catch a wolf." Alonzo Harris
Denzel Washington "Training Day"

Policelights2_max600_max50

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Rate This | Posted almost 6 years ago

 

I am a Police Officer in Phila. Pa and I work for a university.  We do the same job that the Philly PD do. We can respond and make arrest off campus.  Most of my arrest have nothing to do with the university at all.  The only real difference is that we have added duties which some would call BS, put its part of our job.


This is my Glock. There are many like it, but this one is mine!!!!!

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Rate This | Posted almost 6 years ago

 


 I myself have went to work for a large campus Police Dept. after 25+ years on the street and there is not alot of difference except that you are confined to a campus area instead of a small or major city or county. I have now worked 3 years as a campus police officer and after all the years of being a street cop I enjoy being on the campus,  as you can meet and become friends with alot of fine people and do alot of PR work, but If you are not ready for a career and that type of police life then it best to stay away from it. It is great for someone that is just starting out in police work. I was a Sergeant when I was on the street and was just promoted several months ago to shift Sergeant. I do like the life of campus police and yes there are times when I miss the streets, but not as much as I did 3 years ago.....


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Rate This | Posted almost 6 years ago

 

If you carry a state certification, had to attend an academy, are covered by HR218, have arrest powers then youre a cop...plain and simple

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